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Thoughts on Job / Career Prospects for Math/Stats vs Business major [or if lucky, both]

[OP]
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Apr 21, 2004
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Thoughts on Job / Career Prospects for Math/Stats vs Business major [or if lucky, both]

I understand many people are being encouraged to pursue careers in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) but are the opportunities really growing in these fields here in Canada or in the States?

From what I've been reading at least on the Career forum here on RFD , there is really no growing demand for Engineering, except maybe to cover natural attrition from retirements and engineers moving to finance and other fields.

Technology is great but my daughter isn't interested in becoming a programmer or developer and she initially considered Sciences but decided not to pursue any Science program.


So from our family discussion and based on her OUAC (Ontario university applications), she is left with Math/Stats (of course with some Comp Sci) and Business as program choices.

I search up "Mathematics" on indeed and I see this long list
https://ca.indeed.com/Mathematics-jobs

I noticed that many of the job titles include Data Analyst, Data Scientist, Research Analyst, Account Receivable Specialist and Actuarial Analyst.

Is there really a big overlap between Math and Business (outside of Accounting and Management Consulting) programs/courses? When I think of a business program, I think they relate more to the foundation areas of business like: finance, accounting, operations management, sales, marketing, corporate development).


I search "business" in indeed and I get these job titles: Administrative Assistant, Customer Service Representative, Sales Representative, Account Manager, Project Manager, Sales Associate, Project Coordinator, Business Analyst, Account Executive and Business Development Manager.
https://ca.indeed.com/jobs?q=business&l=

A couple of these are sales jobs / business development for sure and I'm not so sure a business degree is even required for many of those.


When exactly does overall high level business knowledge get applied in very siloed job functions here in Canada besides in Investment Finance, Consulting, Entrepreneurship/Start-ups? I studied business too but got into auditing and have really not applied much of my learning to my job at the workplace.
7 replies
Sr. Member
Mar 6, 2015
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alanbrenton wrote: I understand many people are being encouraged to pursue careers in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) but are the opportunities really growing in these fields here in Canada or in the States?
From what I've been reading at least on the Career forum here on RFD , there is really no growing demand for Engineering, except maybe to cover natural attrition from retirements and engineers moving to finance and other fields.
Technology is great but my daughter isn't interested in becoming a programmer or developer and she initially considered Sciences but decided not to pursue any Science program.
So from our family discussion and based on her OUAC (Ontario university applications), she is left with Math/Stats (of course with some Comp Sci) and Business as program choices.
May I stream away from the OP's discussion a bit, how can you conclude by reading the career forum on RFD no growing demand for STEM... Let me rephrase my question, when deciding among STEM, business, math and stats, computer and information technologies, social sciences, arts and humanities careers and post-secondary education, what do you do to achieve a rough and not precise but approximately accurate picture?
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[OP]
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Apr 21, 2004
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cybercavalier wrote: May I stream away from the OP's discussion a bit, how can you conclude by reading the career forum on RFD no growing demand for STEM... Let me rephrase my question, when deciding among STEM, business, math and stats, computer and information technologies, social sciences, arts and humanities careers and post-secondary education, what do you do to achieve a rough and not precise but approximately accurate picture?
I didn't take philosophy class.

I mentioned my daughter is only considering Math and Business or both, so I don't have to provide any research why some fields in STEM will not have a lot of job opportunities. If my days on earth were infinite, sure, I can try and find the elusive answer.

My apologies if my comments based on my rough assessment and comments on RFD ticked you off. STEM is definitely growing but I think opportunities abound in the States based on the list of TN occupation dominated by STEM.
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Apr 14, 2017
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Shes a girl, go into engineering. No brainer. If not engineering, go into comp sci.
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Mar 6, 2015
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alanbrenton wrote: I didn't take philosophy class.

I mentioned my daughter is only considering Math and Business or both, so I don't have to provide any research why some fields in STEM will not have a lot of job opportunities. If my days on earth were infinite, sure, I can try and find the elusive answer.

My apologies if my comments based on my rough assessment and comments on RFD ticked you off. STEM is definitely growing but I think opportunities abound in the States based on the list of TN occupation dominated by STEM.
Wow, what a parent... My apologies if my question based on your OP ticked you off. So in most situations, STEM opportunities are abound in the States and in Canada, application of mathematics (statistics for example) and business are undergraduate studies to go and possibly careers? Having an math, business degrees does not limit oneself to apply for med school, for example.
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Meiji: Ambassador Swanbeck, I have concluded that your treaty is NOT in the best interests of my people. So sorry, but you may not.
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[OP]
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Apr 21, 2004
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cybercavalier wrote: Wow, what a parent... My apologies if my question based on your OP ticked you off. So in most situations, STEM opportunities are abound in the States and in Canada, application of mathematics (statistics for example) and business are undergraduate studies to go and possibly careers? Having an math, business degrees does not limit oneself to apply for med school, for example.
I'm sure promising STEM careers abound in the States but I think less so in Canada. We are commodity based driven economy so yeah they'll need miners, some geologists (scientists) and engineers if they ever do get to the production stage and we only have a few thriving tech companies; of course the banks and other big corporations are there for more quantitative jobs.

But my question is focused on Math and Business and I don't have time to do additional STEM career research (what good would it do for my family?) because it doesn't make sense when my daughter decided between these two or both.
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Aug 15, 2015
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Is your daughter extremely bright? Top in class? Popular at school?

It takes four years to complete an undergrad and at least three years before you can apply to any "professional" school, like medical school.

Perhaps it is more important for your family to learn about which university she should apply to which may give her the best learning so that she is at the best positions for job when and if she graduates.

You do know that some jobs are only posted on university career page, right? There's coop and stuff too.

Good luck at interviews!
Sr. Member
Sep 29, 2008
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Mississauga
If she has a passion for math then a math degree can open a lot of doors. Most business programs require very little math, accounting has virtually nothing to do with math. With a bachelors degree in mathematics she can pursue CS or even go to business school for MBA, the options are endless.

Keep in mind that math majors are difficult and generally a lot tougher to get through than business. Perhaps she would enjoy business more as it is also diverse, it really depends on her interests.

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