Shopping Discussion

Three Brands, Exact same product

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[OP]
Jr. Member
Aug 23, 2016
164 posts
626 upvotes

Three Brands, Exact same product

I'm shopping for usb headsets in the 40-60 dollar range for work. I found these suspicious, highly rated ones:
https://www.amazon.ca/Microphone-Comput ... 07D3QPLNL/
https://www.amazon.ca/Microphone-Cancel ... 071GNGX2L/
https://www.amazon.ca/Headphone-Cancell ... 01MYYW3UA/

They all have different manufacturers but their images are the same just scaled or rotated of the other. What's going on here? What's the point of establishing three companies for the item?

Edit: Even their products lists are more identical products:
https://www.amazon.ca/s?me=ARMUX4P7W8B7 ... Q1WTGCTBG2
https://www.amazon.ca/s?me=A1PXTX0GOWOF ... Q1WTGCTBG2
25 replies
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Feb 11, 2007
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CupofJava wrote: I'm shopping for usb headsets in the 40-60 dollar range for work. I found these suspicious, highly rated ones:
https://www.amazon.ca/Microphone-Comput ... 07D3QPLNL/
https://www.amazon.ca/Microphone-Cancel ... 071GNGX2L/
https://www.amazon.ca/Headphone-Cancell ... 01MYYW3UA/

They all have different manufacturers but their images are the same just scaled or rotated of the other. What's going on here? What's the point of establishing three companies for the item?

Edit: Even their products lists are more identical products:
https://www.amazon.ca/s?me=ARMUX4P7W8B7 ... Q1WTGCTBG2
https://www.amazon.ca/s?me=A1PXTX0GOWOF ... Q1WTGCTBG2
Just like big companies at the grocery store, compete with yourself to give the customer an illusion of choice. Most of the brands are just sub brands of larger companies.
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Feb 19, 2017
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Lots of items are just rebranded from the same OEM company. This is pretty common for things like “smart” plugs, cables, battery, etc. But it does extend to cheaper headphones among other things.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Aug 23, 2016
164 posts
626 upvotes
engineered wrote: Just like big companies at the grocery store, compete with yourself to give the customer an illusion of choice. Most of the brands are just sub brands of larger companies.
What are some grocery products that are surprising rebrands of each other? Are off brand cereals repackaged branded ones?
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CupofJava wrote: What are some grocery products that are surprising rebrands of each other? Are off brand cereals repackaged branded ones?
Yes. In-house brands are usually even made by the same manufacturer as branded ones.
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Mar 23, 2008
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CupofJava wrote: I'm shopping for usb headsets in the 40-60 dollar range for work. I found these suspicious, highly rated ones:
https://www.amazon.ca/Microphone-Comput ... 07D3QPLNL/
https://www.amazon.ca/Microphone-Cancel ... 071GNGX2L/
https://www.amazon.ca/Headphone-Cancell ... 01MYYW3UA/

They all have different manufacturers but their images are the same just scaled or rotated of the other. What's going on here? What's the point of establishing three companies for the item?

Edit: Even their products lists are more identical products:
https://www.amazon.ca/s?me=ARMUX4P7W8B7 ... Q1WTGCTBG2
https://www.amazon.ca/s?me=A1PXTX0GOWOF ... Q1WTGCTBG2
My two guesses... One entity spun up multiple companies to sell whatever. They do this because they're already bringing crap in from overseas, and by having multiple "companies" in Amazon, you turn up multiple links when someone searches for "headphones". It increases your odds of having a customer click on your crappy headphones. They can play around with price points, having things on "sale", etc.

Second option is multiple entities buying from the same Chinese "catalog" of crap (like AliExpress), and selling it on Amazon.

When it comes to consumer electronics, there's far fewer manufacturers than there are businesses selling the stuff. Even on places like AliExpress, it's often not the manufacturer who's listed on there, but the wholesaler/importer. So you can buy from A, or from B, and you'll get exactly the same product.

C
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The vast majority of electronics in the world are designed and manufactured in Shenzhen and Dongguan.

Manufacturers sell those unbranded products to downstream customers like Anker and Insignia. Those companies basically serve as end-user customer support and brand recognition.

The product photos are often similar or the same because resellers are provided photos by the manufacturer.
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cursayer wrote: Yes. In-house brands are usually even made by the same manufacturer as branded ones.
Yup, some good examples are when my wife shops in the cosmetic section, the toners, etc. The some Equate brand stuff looks curiously similar to the namebrand ones. Now, I dunno if they have slightly better ingredients for the latter, but the outward appearance and packaging are eerily similar.
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CupofJava wrote: They all have different manufacturers but their images are the same just scaled or rotated of the other. What's going on here? What's the point of establishing three companies for the item?
They are different sellers, all selling the same product from the one manufacturer.

Canada has no consumer electronics manufacturing capability, so it may be hard to understand. But imagine a salmon canning plant making the same product for different supermarkets.
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CupofJava wrote: What are some grocery products that are surprising rebrands of each other? Are off brand cereals repackaged branded ones?
Just about everything. For instance, Wonder Bread is made in the same local bakery as PC or No Name bread. They have different formulations.
Companies like to sell a premium and a low cost product, sometimes middle market as well, that way they capture buyers as all ends of the market.

Same thing goes for car companies.
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Mar 20, 2009
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engineered wrote: Just about everything. For instance, Wonder Bread is made in the same local bakery as PC or No Name bread. They have different formulations.
Companies like to sell a premium and a low cost product, sometimes middle market as well, that way they capture buyers as all ends of the market.

Same thing goes for car companies.
Same goes with Costco Kirkland brand. In many cases, Costco just struck a deal with established manufacturers (food, clothing, etc) to produce their branded product.
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CNeufeld wrote: My two guesses... One entity spun up multiple companies to sell whatever. They do this because they're already bringing crap in from overseas, and by having multiple "companies" in Amazon, you turn up multiple links when someone searches for "headphones". It increases your odds of having a customer click on your crappy headphones. They can play around with price points, having things on "sale", etc.

Second option is multiple entities buying from the same Chinese "catalog" of crap (like AliExpress), and selling it on Amazon.

When it comes to consumer electronics, there's far fewer manufacturers than there are businesses selling the stuff. Even on places like AliExpress, it's often not the manufacturer who's listed on there, but the wholesaler/importer. So you can buy from A, or from B, and you'll get exactly the same product.
Yup.

For example, I needed to buy a USB-C to dual-link DVI adapter for my MacBook to use with an ancient Apple 30" Cinema HD Display. Most of the ones out there don't work because they're not dual-link or else they require HDCP, or they are just incompatible. A few people suggested I buy the Club 3D CAC-1510-A (HDCP OFF) model because that is known to work. However, after I searched around a bit, I found an unbranded identical item on Aliexpress for much cheaper, as well as a CableCreation USB-C to Dual-Link DVI adapter on Amazon, also for much cheaper. For the latter, the only difference I could find was that it had a gold-plated connector.

I wasn't going to go with aliexpress because of the long shipping times and the effective lack of a viable return policy (since you'd have to ship it back to China), so I got the inexpensive CableCreation one on Amazon.

The CableCreation one works fine, and it turns out that it has the exact same internal Synaptics chipset, exact same hardware configuration, and exact same firmware version number as the Club 3D, but at only 2/3rds the price.

Image

Image
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engineered wrote: Same thing goes for car companies.
One of the most laughable examples must be GM's using the Chevy Cavalier across its entire range, all the way to making it a Cadillac Cimarron. Atrocious lol.
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OP this is nothing new. It’s like the Chevrolet Chevette and Pontiac Acadian. Or Dodge Aries and Plymouth Reliant. Or Ford Tempo and Mercury Topaz. Or Suzuki Sidekick, GMC Tracker, and Asüna Sunrunner. Same junk, different badging.

Yikes, am i ever dating myself with these comparisons lol
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Nearly everything Sears sold was rebranded from a manufacture and they just slapped the Kenmore or whatever name on it.
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tranquility922 wrote: One of the most laughable examples must be GM's using the Chevy Cavalier across its entire range, all the way to making it a Cadillac Cimarron. Atrocious lol.
Yes I remember those, the J-body was used in a lot of GM vehicles. As silly as that was, nothing beats the K-Car. At one point in the '80's, every Chrysler model was a K-Car in a different form:
-econobox
-family sedan
-luxury sedan
-sports car
-van
c'mon get happy!
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This is called whitelabelling and it is common on Amazon. As a seller, I would order a few hundred or however many from a manufacturer (often via Alibaba) and get them to slap my own brand on the product & packaging. Then I can sell it through Amazon, Walmart, eBay, Best Buy, etc. You'll see this a lot with electronics as well as trendy products. Whitelabelers will keep a close eye on trendy products and quickly flood the market with their own brands.

Here's an example of a diaper bag that was a very popular whitelabel product a few years ago. My wife saw it shared in a mommy group on Facebook and bought it off of Amazon. A month later, we went to a Parents & Kids Fair. Hundreds of moms there all had the same backpack with a different brand on it and half the kiosks were selling it too, often with their own brand.
engineered wrote: Just about everything. For instance, Wonder Bread is made in the same local bakery as PC or No Name bread. They have different formulations.
Not quite the same thing as Weston actually owns the Canadian trademark for Wonder Bread.
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tranquility922 wrote: One of the most laughable examples must be GM's using the Chevy Cavalier across its entire range, all the way to making it a Cadillac Cimarron. Atrocious lol.
Yea, that was bad.

VW uses the same platform from a $40k A4/Q5 to a $250k Lamborghini Urus.

MLB Evo
Audi Q7 (Typ 4M), 2015–present
Bentley Bentayga (Typ 4V), 2015–present
Audi A4 (Typ 8W), 2016–present
Audi A5 (Typ 8W6), 2016–present
Audi Q5 (Typ 80A), 2017–present
Audi A7 (Typ 4K8), 2017–present
Audi A8 (Typ 4N), 2017–present
Audi A6 (Typ 4K), 2018–present
Audi Q8 (Typ 4MN), 2018–present
Audi e-tron (Typ GE), 2018–present
Lamborghini Urus
Porsche Cayenne (third generation) (Type 9YA), 2018–present
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.

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