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three US Job offers received, should I negociate?

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  • May 27th, 2016 5:19 pm
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[OP]
Jr. Member
Jan 18, 2016
122 posts
9 upvotes
Toronto, ON

three US Job offers received, should I negociate?

I received three job offers from the same US company after extensive interviews with each of the 3 departments over the past few months. I guess their HR department decided to send all offers at the same time so that I can choose the right position for myself.

The offer is the exact pay for all three positions, with the same benefits including up to $5000 US relocation compensation.

The offer did not mention if they are negotiable or not. The offer is fair, but I would like to negotiate for more. How should I approach this without insulting the hiring manager? Or should I not be trying to get anymore? I figure it is a good time to ask before hire, rather than working for years and not getting much in the way of annual increases...
24 replies
Deal Addict
Jan 30, 2012
1579 posts
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TORONTO
capitalgain wrote: The offer did not mention if they are negotiable or not.
Just about everything is negotiable. You are very likely to only get what you ask for.
Newbie
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May 20, 2016
52 posts
12 upvotes
Industry? Different industry and corporate structure have different wiggle room for negotiation, also depends on your department, position, etc. New grad? advance degree? prior experiencce? you unemployed at the moment or jumping ship?

If you are relocating, and you feel the offer is "Fair", try to tackle from the expense angle. Where you headed? NYC? boston? LA? different currency hence standard of living diffs, attack from this angle. SHOW CHARTS, NUMBERS, FIGURES. All part of the game.
And yes, always negotiate don't take anything. Think value.

And don't think for a moment you won't get raise after a few years...who knows, all depends on your work productivity, your relationships with your bosses, his/her bosses, and company's bottom line.

Jayson
Former Quant and eng co-op student correcting fallacious hype on resume and interview
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May 9, 2012
493 posts
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SF Bay Area
is this a junior position?

$5000 for relocation seems pretty low. Do they pay tax on the $5000? if they don't you'll probably get around $3000 after all the tax
At my current job, the relocation package was one month of salary grossed up (meaning I get the full month of salary and they pay tax), moving all my stuffs, ship two cars and 1 month of temp housing.

If they are also shipping your stuffs make sure they pay tax for all the moving expenses as they are treated as taxable benefits.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Jan 18, 2016
122 posts
9 upvotes
Toronto, ON
JaysonHFI wrote: Industry? Different industry and corporate structure have different wiggle room for negotiation, also depends on your department, position, etc. New grad? advance degree? prior experiencce? you unemployed at the moment or jumping ship?

If you are relocating, and you feel the offer is "Fair", try to tackle from the expense angle. Where you headed? NYC? boston? LA? different currency hence standard of living diffs, attack from this angle. SHOW CHARTS, NUMBERS, FIGURES. All part of the game.
And yes, always negotiate don't take anything. Think value.

And don't think for a moment you won't get raise after a few years...who knows, all depends on your work productivity, your relationships with your bosses, his/her bosses, and company's bottom line.

Jayson
Energy Industry, Public Utility, New York City
3-5 year experience, electrical engineering degree, currently employed and jumping ship.
pltz77 wrote: is this a junior position?

$5000 for relocation seems pretty low. Do they pay tax on the $5000? if they don't you'll probably get around $3000 after all the tax
At my current job, the relocation package was one month of salary grossed up (meaning I get the full month of salary and they pay tax), moving all my stuffs, ship two cars and 1 month of temp housing.

If they are also shipping your stuffs make sure they pay tax for all the moving expenses as they are treated as taxable benefits.
The positions are all ranked at the same pay level within the company, although some are actually more senior than others. They are all relatively junior though given that they only need 1-3 years experience depending on the role.
Newbie
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May 20, 2016
52 posts
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You got everything on your side: leverage, timing, narrowed expertise in specific fields. What's there not to negotiate?

Again, if you said that the positions are all ranked in same pay grade (like most public sector jobs in your case utility), the only way they could push your salary is probably to the highest boundary within your level OR push you up a pay grade (highly unlikely unless they changed your titles as well, which might cause chaos btw your immediate managers and hr, and if they want you that much).

You have a backup plan from all this? You planning to stay in NYC for a while?
Former Quant and eng co-op student correcting fallacious hype on resume and interview
[OP]
Jr. Member
Jan 18, 2016
122 posts
9 upvotes
Toronto, ON
JaysonHFI wrote: You got everything on your side: leverage, timing, narrowed expertise in specific fields. What's there not to negotiate?

Again, if you said that the positions are all ranked in same pay grade (like most public sector jobs in your case utility), the only way they could push your salary is probably to the highest boundary within your level OR push you up a pay grade (highly unlikely unless they changed your titles as well, which might cause chaos btw your immediate managers and hr, and if they want you that much).

You have a backup plan from all this? You planning to stay in NYC for a while?
I agree, likely they would only push me to the highest boundary within the level, definitely not into the next title.

No backup plan. I plan on staying in NYC for at least 2-3 years and possiblity moving further south after.
Newbie
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May 20, 2016
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You hate the North that much LOL
Granted, earning USD might be a good implicit "investment move" for next couple of years
Former Quant and eng co-op student correcting fallacious hype on resume and interview
Newbie
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May 20, 2016
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Back to the negotiation topic. Dont' just talk to them, show them, got it?
Former Quant and eng co-op student correcting fallacious hype on resume and interview
[OP]
Jr. Member
Jan 18, 2016
122 posts
9 upvotes
Toronto, ON
Yep, to be honest I dislike the high taxes of canada, high cost of home ownership and cold weather. NYC isn't much better but it is a stop-off to the lower cost south.

So basically don't ask for the pay increase, but tell them it is required before signing back?
Newbie
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May 20, 2016
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capitalgain wrote: Yep, to be honest I dislike the high taxes of canada, high cost of home ownership and cold weather. NYC isn't much better but it is a stop-off to the lower cost south.

So basically don't ask for the pay increase, but tell them it is required before signing back?
Well that's up for you to decide, since you know them more than I know them. But, keep this in mind: Donn't push your managers to the limit. He/she does have a budget and corporate politics (or melee) to work with. You are there to help, not stroke your ego.

If it's the case like how you presented, then yeah tackle the relocation expense by presenting figures and data. Concrete data i might add, with references.
Former Quant and eng co-op student correcting fallacious hype on resume and interview
Deal Expert
Jun 30, 2006
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Toronto
Cost of living is high in New York. You have to negotiate for every penny.
Sr. Member
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Feb 16, 2016
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Casselman, Ontario
carmaster wrote: Cost of living is high in New York. You have to negotiate for every penny.
This. I know someone living in central NYC and his rent is like 6000$-7000$/month. He makes about 140k/year and is having a hard time keeping up financially. Also, supposedly, car insurance prices are insane.
Newbie
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May 20, 2016
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Potrice wrote: This. I know someone living in central NYC and his rent is like 6000$-7000$/month. He makes about 140k/year and is having a hard time keeping up financially. Also, supposedly, car insurance prices are insane.
Insane, but everyone's mother's cousins' sons want to work on WS (and other opportunities of course, not to mention the big city limelights). Supply and demand.
Former Quant and eng co-op student correcting fallacious hype on resume and interview
Member
Mar 5, 2009
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Potrice wrote: This. I know someone living in central NYC and his rent is like 6000$-7000$/month. He makes about 140k/year and is having a hard time keeping up financially. Also, supposedly, car insurance prices are insane.
I lived in a 3 bedroom apartment north of Manhattan and it was 6k/month split between 3 of us. This was only 3 years ago. Your friends rent is not realistically true.

Also, who buys a car in NYC? You get around the city faster with public transportation.

Either you're stretching the truth or your friend is very high maintenance.
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Feb 16, 2016
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serious7 wrote: I lived in a 3 bedroom apartment north of Manhattan and it was 6k/month split between 3 of us. This was only 3 years ago. Your friends rent is not realistically true.

Also, who buys a car in NYC? You get around the city faster with public transportation.

Either you're stretching the truth or your friend is very high maintenance.
This. The apartment is very big and he refuses to downsize (I know....don't ask...lol) and yes he is high maintenance. I think he orders more food than he cooks. I wonder how much he pays at the end of the year for take out food...it really adds up.
Member
Mar 5, 2009
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Potrice wrote: This. The apartment is very big and he refuses to downsize (I know....don't ask...lol) and yes he is high maintenance. I think he orders more food than he cooks. I wonder how much he pays at the end of the year for take out food...it really adds up.
Even at 140k, you can live financially well in NYC. My buddies all have that same life style earning similar amounts. They are still able to save enough.
Deal Guru
Oct 3, 2006
10467 posts
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Toronto
Potrice wrote: This. I know someone living in central NYC and his rent is like 6000$-7000$/month. He makes about 140k/year and is having a hard time keeping up financially. Also, supposedly, car insurance prices are insane.
Clearly the person your know chose to put himself in a hard financial position. There are nice 1 bedroom apartments in Manhattan for $3000 a month. Friend of a co-worker lives in NYC on 40k a year.
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Feb 29, 2008
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capitalgain wrote: Yep, to be honest I dislike the high taxes of canada, high cost of home ownership and cold weather. NYC isn't much better but it is a stop-off to the lower cost south.

So basically don't ask for the pay increase, but tell them it is required before signing back?
Good move. Think we are so used to paying through the nose for everything here that we don't realize just how bad it is. I'd negotiate the relocation $. It's very low
Deal Addict
Feb 16, 2010
1088 posts
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capitalgain wrote: Yep, to be honest I dislike the high taxes of canada, high cost of home ownership and cold weather. NYC isn't much better but it is a stop-off to the lower cost south.

So basically don't ask for the pay increase, but tell them it is required before signing back?
I also dislike paying 30% of my salary to guys like "oldmarriedguy". Hopefully i can also get out of this socialist hell hole.

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