Personal Finance

Tip % options at the debit/credit card machine

  • Last Updated:
  • Oct 27th, 2019 1:54 pm
[OP]
Jr. Member
User avatar
Oct 25, 2018
128 posts
140 upvotes
Kelowna

Tip % options at the debit/credit card machine

At restaurants, I'm now used to seeing 3 options for tips:

1 - 15%
2 - 18%
3 - 20%

Just the other day, a restaurant I went to added a new option: 24%

Keeping in mind that the machine calculates this percentage on the total *including* HST (so it works out to about 25% in BC, or 27% in Ontario), who is actually paying that much in tips?
38 replies
Sr. Member
Feb 28, 2014
973 posts
1158 upvotes
There's usually a custom option that let's you put in how much you're willing to tip. Most people don't out of convenience but it's there.

I've seen machines have their lowest at 18%, so a high of 24% isn't too surprising.
Deal Addict
May 31, 2018
1145 posts
2878 upvotes
22% seems quite common now on the machines I've seen. There has been much discussion about tipping over the last few years, and it seems to be just like everything else...regardless of the fundamentals, everyone simply expects it to keep going up over time.

I still habitually tip 20% for excellent service, 15% for everything else, but then we dine out rarely enough that a few percent doesn't really matter in the end. For people that are in restaurants 3 or more times a week the tip expenditure must really add up.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Nov 26, 2003
1286 posts
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Common trickery for people who are lazy, afraid of "appearing cheap", or who are not good at math.

Regardless of the percent amount you choose, the tip should be based on the PRE-TAX food total. Personally I choose not to tip on alcohol, unless I've been given helpful direction from the waiter or sommelier on selecting an appropriate bottle of wine for the meal, in which case its obviously merited.
Jr. Member
Jun 14, 2011
145 posts
267 upvotes
camzie wrote: Common trickery for people who are lazy, afraid of "appearing cheap", or who are not good at math.

Regardless of the percent amount you choose, the tip should be based on the PRE-TAX food total. Personally I choose not to tip on alcohol, unless I've been given helpful direction from the waiter or sommelier on selecting an appropriate bottle of wine for the meal, in which case its obviously merited.
A convenient FYI on tipping..

If people have a tendency to tip the standard 15% at restaurants, it's just shy of 14% (POST-TAX) for it to equate to 15% tip (PRE-TAX).

You may have the feeling of being cheap when you punch in 14%, but this will save you from having to calculate the 15% PRE-TAX amount in front of your server.
Member
User avatar
Dec 28, 2010
340 posts
199 upvotes
bodybuilders against tipping crew

why tip when you can use those savings to purchase more creatine?
mysticalinfluence wrote: Brah do you make 100K year too and wear Canada Goose? You might not be fat but your fattest douche bag on RFD.
kenchau66 wrote: you mean "you're"
Deal Addict
May 16, 2017
2454 posts
3230 upvotes
Great social-engineering by the food services industry. Off-load wages onto the customers without them realizing it.

The Canadian food services industry has made huge marketing efforts in the last few years to increase the socially acceptable "standard" tip value up from 10% in the last couple of decades.

A lot easier to get the public to accept higher tips than it is to lobby the government to increase the minimum wage.
Deal Addict
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Dec 24, 2007
1698 posts
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BC
Wow...who is behind this increasing tip% creep from 15% to 24%. I can understand this from the American point of view since their minimum wage in many states for workers who work in jobs that earn tips hasn't changed for decades at $2/hour, so padding tips to make a living wage is necessary. But in Canada, the minimum wage applies to everyone so to tip a person 24% of the bill, forget it. I haven't changed by tipping policy since the minimum wage started rising, and have kept it at 12-15%. That's it. Call me cheap if you want to but being realistic. In the US, that is a different story and I will tip the 18%.

Read this about the hard truth about tipping and you'll change your mind about paying outrageous tips... $100,000 a year waitress isn't a myth. It's time to stop this tip nonsense.

My son works at a retail chain and services customers as much as any other restaurant server and all he gets is a "customer appreciation" card for a job well done. Why do servers get any more for just doing their job? Don't serve your customer well, get fired...you don't need tips to encourage proper service. The Europeans and Japanese don't have a tip culture and you get just as good a service.
Last edited by WetCoastGuy on Oct 21st, 2019 2:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Deal Addict
Nov 8, 2017
1556 posts
888 upvotes
I'll tip 5% for deliveries or pick up.
10 for everyone else . Minimum wage is almost 14$ in bc.
Member
Aug 1, 2014
303 posts
239 upvotes
Unfortunately a lot of restaurants use tips as an excuse to keep base wages low for their employees.
Deal Addict
May 16, 2017
2454 posts
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Khichdi wrote: Unfortunately a lot of restaurants use tips as an excuse to keep base wages low for their employees.
Which is precisely why the industry actively promotes ever increasing tip rates (along with the travel/tourism industry).
Deal Addict
Jun 21, 2008
2973 posts
410 upvotes
Toronto
Quick question - are the tips they get from machines paid out to them in unreported cash?

Or is that more the norm for bartenders at cash bars?
Deal Addict
Jun 12, 2008
1525 posts
1069 upvotes
Ripley
WetCoastGuy wrote: But in Canada, the minimum wage applies to everyone so to tip a person 24% of the bill, forget it.
Liquor servers minimum wage in Ontario is $12.20 per hour. This applies to anyone who serves alcohol as part of their job. Regular minimum wage is $14.00.
Sr. Member
Jul 3, 2019
856 posts
461 upvotes
Don’t get fooled by the machine. That’s all I’m gonna say.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 24, 2007
1698 posts
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BC
Khichdi wrote: Unfortunately a lot of restaurants use tips as an excuse to keep base wages low for their employees.
Minimum wage laws have raised base wages for everyone so this is nothing but blatant attempt to pull a fast one on ignorant consumers by importing a policy that is more appropriate in the US than in Canada. Also that percentage increase from 18% to 24% is not just a 6% increase but a 6%/18% increase or 33% increase so it is ridiculously out of hand. That $100,000 server is not a myth in lots of high end restaurants.

Easiest way to calculate a tip if not using the machine calculation: double the GST $ amount for 10% or triple it for 15% or take the middle between 10% and 15% for 12%
Deal Addict
Nov 8, 2017
1556 posts
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WetCoastGuy wrote: Wow...who is behind this increasing tip% creep from 15% to 24%. I can understand this from the American point of view since their minimum wage in many states for workers who work in jobs that earn tips hasn't changed for decades at $2/hour, so padding tips to make a living wage is necessary. But in Canada, the minimum wage applies to everyone so to tip a person 24% of the bill, forget it. I haven't changed by tipping policy since the minimum wage started rising, and have kept it at 12-15%. That's it. Call me cheap if you want to but being realistic. In the US, that is a different story and I will tip the 18%.

Read this about the hard truth about tipping and you'll change your mind about paying outrageous tips... $100,000 a year waitress isn't a myth. It's time to stop this tip nonsense.

My son works at a retail chain and services customers as much as any other restaurant server and all he gets is a "customer appreciation" card for a job well done. Why do servers get any more for just doing their job? Don't serve your customer well, get fired...you don't need tips to encourage proper service. The Europeans and Japanese don't have a tip culture and you get just as good a service.
good servers in Europe make 40-50k just from their wage

As the minimum wage has creeped up in BC , my tip amount has gone down
Jr. Member
Jun 6, 2018
101 posts
48 upvotes
In Scotland, one does not tip at all unless the service is like royalty. They actually give you a weird look should you try.
So far it looks like I AM the cheapest tipper. My standard tip is 10% of the subtotal. Easy calculation.
It is rare to receive service worthy of more.
Now with that said, I knew someone who paid her whole tuition for nursing college from tips. She treated the regulars like family. People always returned for the kindness. Probably why some would tip a $100 on a $20 meal.
Deal Addict
Aug 15, 2009
2594 posts
2182 upvotes
Montreal
Even fast food have implemented tipping. I will never tip a fast food, EVER.

I always hit the custom and enter my own tip. Usually 15% or lower or zero.

Call me cheap.
Deal Fanatic
Feb 4, 2015
8901 posts
5171 upvotes
Canada, Eh!!
In Ontario or Quebec I just tip the tax amount if service ok... else adjust down or up depending on quality of service
2022: BOC raised 8 times and MCAP raised its prime next day.
2017 to 2018: BOC raised rates 5 times and MCAP raised its prime next day each time.
2020: BOC dropped rates 3 times and MCAP waited to drop its prime to include all 3 drops.
Sr. Member
Feb 28, 2014
973 posts
1158 upvotes
elpaso wrote: Even fast food have implemented tipping. I will never tip a fast food, EVER.

I always hit the custom and enter my own tip. Usually 15% or lower or zero.

Call me cheap.
Which fast food chain asked you to tip? I have never seen that one before... What service did they actually provide that can be tippable? Making the food and handing you the bag is not something that's considered tippable...

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