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Tips needed - Finishing a plywood door/cabinet

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  • Jul 7th, 2020 1:02 am
[OP]
Member
Dec 18, 2017
302 posts
41 upvotes

Tips needed - Finishing a plywood door/cabinet

Attached is the basic Plywood/Raw Door which I DIYed.
1)Looking for cheapest tricks on how to finish that raw look. It is for Garage so I do not mind too much of aesthetics though i thought good idea to give it a finished look.
2)While fixing the doors, could not manage to do it 100% perfectly so that left some small gap between 2 doors which should be 0.15-0.25 cms roughly. Looking for ideas/recommendations if there is a way to apply any trick to cover that gap ;)
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5 replies
Deal Addict
Jun 26, 2019
1993 posts
1723 upvotes
GTA
smartnew wrote: 1)Looking for cheapest tricks on how to finish that raw look. It is for Garage so I do not mind too much of aesthetics though i thought good idea to give it a finished look.
Paint? Otherwise, if you just want to see it and you just want to apply some finish to it probably just put on some Shellac. That ply will soak up a ton of some finishes.
smartnew wrote: 2)While fixing the doors, could not manage to do it 100% perfectly so that left some small gap between 2 doors which should be 0.15-0.25 cms roughly. Looking for ideas/recommendations if there is a way to apply any trick to cover that gap ;)
Adding edge banding or most other things won't be thick enough to close that gap. You could try either adding face framing, or add a piece to one door on the front that overlaps the second door. That way you have no gaps.
Deal Addict
Feb 26, 2016
1458 posts
463 upvotes
Vaughan
i normally apply a couple layers of stain (at least 2 coats) and then a couple layers of finish. Lastly I sand down the finish with a very high grit sandpaper to remove the "stickiness" from the finish. Depending on the stain you use, it'll display the grain lines of the plywood. If you don't want to show the wood grains and knots, you can use a Shellac Primer-Sealer which should get rid of all the natural wood look.

with regards to the the gap, depending on the hinges you installed, you should be able to adjust it to move it closer so the gap is not visible. If that's not possible, my only suggestion is to add some trim around the doors so you cover the gap. Others may have a more elegant solution though.
Deal Addict
Nov 17, 2012
4588 posts
4015 upvotes
Toronto
You need a gap otherwise the doors won't operate, but it can be very small. I think the thicker the door, the bigger the gap needs to be to avoid them hitting each other when one closes.

That gap looks a lot bigger than 1.5 or 2 mm as you indicate in your post. The plywood looks like builder grade sheathing - not 'good one side' sanded or furniture grade plywood.

Give it a light sand, a coat of urethane and call it a day.
Deal Expert
Feb 7, 2017
22774 posts
21607 upvotes
Eastern Ontario
SubjectivelyObjective wrote: Paint? Otherwise, if you just want to see it and you just want to apply some finish to it probably just put on some Shellac. That ply will soak up a ton of some finishes.

Adding edge banding or most other things won't be thick enough to close that gap. You could try either adding face framing, or add a piece to one door on the front that overlaps the second door. That way you have no gaps.
This

FINISHING

If it’s in the garage and therefore exposed to a good bit of weather, I’d either use a High Gloss Oil Paint, those made for front doors, here’s one example = https://www.benjaminmoore.com/en-ca/int ... d-entrance

Or Marine Paint or Varnish. These are awesome, but a bit more finicky about application technique & a longer drying time.

THE GAP

Overlapping trim is an easy solution. To ensure proper closing, best applied to one door over the gap. Then it’s a case of when using the cabinet you open that door first, and close it last ... to “mind the gap”
Deal Guru
Jan 25, 2007
11944 posts
7118 upvotes
Paris
PointsHubby wrote: Overlapping trim is an easy solution. To ensure proper closing, best applied to one door over the gap. Then it’s a case of when using the cabinet you open that door first, and close it last ... to “mind the gap”
I would overlap or I would put a piece of trim all around both doors that fills the gap. Would need to take down and trim more off each door for a piece of trim all the way around.

I’d lean into the look for a garage. Clear poly on top of what you have.

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