Parenting & Family

Tips / websites for finding a private tutor

  • Last Updated:
  • Oct 18th, 2019 7:44 am
[OP]
Deal Addict
Aug 5, 2008
1361 posts
679 upvotes

Tips / websites for finding a private tutor

Looking to get a private tutor for my child who is in second grade, and wanted to hear if there are any positive or negative experiences with specific websites or services, or tips on where to look.

Thanks!
There are 10 kinds of people in the world... Those who understand binary and those who don't 💡
19 replies
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2013
3429 posts
1223 upvotes
Woodbridge
What are you hoping to get out of tutoring? Has your child's teacher highlighted any concerns that are motivating you to seek out tutoring?
[OP]
Deal Addict
Aug 5, 2008
1361 posts
679 upvotes
Kiraly wrote: Let me guess. You're looking for tutoring services located around here?
North of the GTA (Vaughan, Richmond Hill, Markham) but the question is more general.
There are 10 kinds of people in the world... Those who understand binary and those who don't 💡
[OP]
Deal Addict
Aug 5, 2008
1361 posts
679 upvotes
OntEdTchr wrote: What are you hoping to get out of tutoring? Has your child's teacher highlighted any concerns that are motivating you to seek out tutoring?
Primarily the homework. It takes an hour to two to complete, a few days each week. I'd like to have someone help us with that.
There are 10 kinds of people in the world... Those who understand binary and those who don't 💡
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2013
3429 posts
1223 upvotes
Woodbridge
junkmail2002 wrote: Primarily the homework. It takes an hour to two to complete, a few days each week. I'd like to have someone help us with that.
You could visit the big franchises like Sylvan or Oxford to tour their facilities, meet the teachers and see the environment. You're probably going to want to find a place that keeps the group sizes to four or under. I've had students go to tutoring centres where they had one tutor with eight or more students and they basically got no attention. Your best bet is to look around in your community for flyers posted on mail boxes or grocery stores or community centres of private tutors that are OCT certified. You'll likely be able to find a certified teacher offering tutoring for around $40/hr for a Grade 2 student. You can check that a teacher is certified by going to oct.ca and looking up their name. If you prefer a physical centre, different experiences will vary. I don't have any recommendations for a child that young but I might ask some other parents at your child's school or even some teachers. They'll have recommendations specific to your community.

I also wanted to share my opinion on this...

A second grader should not be getting one to two hours of homework a few days each week. Is it taking that long to complete because your child doesn't know how to do it or is losing focus or is the volume of work actually that high? If I were in your position I'd set up a meeting with the teacher and express my concerns that it's taking that long to complete the homework and discuss options. The YRDSB Policy and Procedure #320.0 recommends a daily maximum of 20 minutes of homework for students in Grades 1-3. Reading at home, accessing digital tools such as Epic!, mPower, Prodigy, Raz Kids etc. speaking with a family member about what the child is learning at school etc. all count as homework. Homework should be meaningful, purposeful, and support the learning done at school. It shouldn't be given for the sake of it and it shouldn't put parents in a position of having to choose between family time or getting homework done. If your child is taking that long because they don't know how to do the work then sending homework home is basically transferring the teacher's job to you, the parent, who is looking to transfer it to a tutor. If your child knows how to do the work but it's just taking too long then the homework isn't doing anything. It's like going to the gym and doing 1000 2-pound curls. I'll get tired and bored but won't actually see any gains.

Playing educational games with your child, reading to your child, listening to your child read to you, asking them to make predictions and inferences about what they're reading, going for walks and looking at things in nature, playing with math facts or commonly used words flashcards etc. are all valuable activities that have been shown to improve a child's engagement at school and attitude towards learning. Sitting them in front of a worksheet or a textbook for an hour makes learning a chore.

I don't know what your personal feelings are about homework but I've done extensive research and the current literature shows that the typical homework given at the elementary level does not improve student achievement. Certain types of homework in the upper years do start to show some statistically significant effects on achievement, but those studies cite several confounding variables (e.g. the work habits, attitudes, and learning skills of students that typically do their homework are the same work habits, attitudes, and learning skills necessary to do well at the post-secondary level. Those work habits, attitudes, and skills may be developed and exist independent of homework, and those students may achieve just as well even if they had not been given homework). As your child progresses through the junior and intermediate grades the expectations on them will increase. My Grade 8s have several ongoing tasks at any given moment with various due dates that they need to keep track of and plan for. What they don't have is an hour of nightly homework that they need to do just, cause, well, homework.
Deal Addict
Jan 2, 2015
2051 posts
1461 upvotes
NOT centre of Univer…
Agreed about 1-2 hours of homework for a second grader. As OntEdtcher said, you need to see why it's 1-2 hours.

If it's the volume, and takes most kids that long, I would be speaking to the school. I tell my kids teachers every year they get my kids for most of the day. They should be able to finish most of their homework at school. If it's because my kid doesn't finish because they were slow or unfocused, that's fine, but homework for the sake of homework will not be done. For my older child (jr. high), homework is usually due to research or more thinking time where the concepts were covered in class and home time is to reflect and do the assignment, as OntEd said, my middle school kid has multiple projects on going. She manages her time, but it's not nightly.

If other kids are not taking 1-2 then you need to look at why. If it's not understanding the materials, then your child should be working with the teacher, the parents, and possibility a tutor. If it's focus, or discipline, then you need help your child develop this skills. A tutor can assist but it's up to the parent help figure out what is challenge. Often these 'homework' skills are developed in other areas of development.
On a 'smart' device that isn't always so smart. So please forgive the autocorrects and typos. If it bothers you, then don't read my posts, but don't waste my time correcting me. If you can get past the typos, then my posts generally have some value.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Aug 5, 2008
1361 posts
679 upvotes
Thanks everyone for you feedback. I really appreciate the time you took to write it and provide your insights (esp relating to volume of homework). It helps as a sanity check for a worried parent.

I think the problem is partially with the student (focus) and partially with us as parents who don't have the time/energy/patience to deal with the lack of focus (and behaviour that is normal for a kid) and partially with the amount of homework the school gives out, creating a trifecta of factors which result in frustrated parents, frustrated student and creating negative feedback to learning... and then each session further reinforcing this.

The hope is that having someone who is outside of the current relationship dynamics, and someone who the student would look up to and be more open to listening/learning will make it easier to learn and turn what now seems like a spiral in the negative direction, into something more positive.
There are 10 kinds of people in the world... Those who understand binary and those who don't 💡
Deal Addict
User avatar
Mar 23, 2008
4046 posts
440 upvotes
Toronto
I found mine at Kijiji. She's a retired elementary school teacher. Fantastic at what she does.
I'm in Hamilton so it's too far for you. I'm sure you can find ones in your area by posting.
Member
Feb 13, 2017
297 posts
128 upvotes
Mississauga
Thank you for those who posted their advice on this. I’m also struggling with my grade 1 son. The issue here isn’t too much homework but lack of focus. It’s extremely exhausting to keep reminding him to focus, especially with another child and one more on the way. Does anyone have any tips on what might help? We have cut down considerably on screen time as I noticed that would make him more fidgety and less likely to focus. He already goes for martial arts 2x a week and swimming 1x. I also notice focus issues in the extracurriculars as he just wants to play and not listen to the instructor.
Deal Addict
Jan 2, 2015
2051 posts
1461 upvotes
NOT centre of Univer…
junkmail2002 wrote: I think the problem is partially with the student (focus) and partially with us as parents who don't have the time/energy/patience to deal with the lack of focus (and behaviour that is normal for a kid) and partially with the amount of homework the school gives out, creating a trifecta of factors which result in frustrated parents, frustrated student and creating negative feedback to learning... and then each session further reinforcing this.

The hope is that having someone who is outside of the current relationship dynamics, and someone who the student would look up to and be more open to listening/learning will make it easier to learn and turn what now seems like a spiral in the negative direction, into something more positive.
So you have three challenges
1. with the student (focus)
2. parents who don't have the time/energy/patience to deal with the lack of focus (and behaviour that is normal for a kid)
3. amount of homework the school gives out

1 & 2 go together. Teaching and working on focus time consuming, frustrating and can suck the life out of a busy parent, but that is pretty much many things that come to with teaching kids things. You can partially outsource to a tutor, but the biggest influence will be you as a parent. The tutor will be there to help the child with the content and concepts for the homework, where as focus will be secondary (if at all) You have less of a struggle with the homework portion, but will still have focus challenges. There are a lot things parents can do to teach their kids to focus that have nothing to do with homework (just google them) Many involve playing games and doing different activities, and getting them away from screens.
3. You can ask for a reduction in homework, but you need to be sure it's not that you kid takes 3 times as long. My spouse used to complain that he was given an hour of hour every night. It was because he spent 50 minutes avoiding the homework, and 10 actually doing it. You can check with other parents. If it is that much, then talk to the teacher. I think there is a lot that can be done at home first. If you want to.
On a 'smart' device that isn't always so smart. So please forgive the autocorrects and typos. If it bothers you, then don't read my posts, but don't waste my time correcting me. If you can get past the typos, then my posts generally have some value.
Member
Jun 23, 2006
360 posts
127 upvotes
Does anyone have any tips on what might help? We have cut down considerably on screen time as I noticed that would make him more fidgety and less likely to focus. He already goes for martial arts 2x a week and swimming 1x. I also notice focus issues in the extracurriculars as he just wants to play and not listen to the instructor.
[/quote]

My kids’ principal raves about the benefits of unstructured play time for primary age kids instead of homework.
Unstructured play is when kids are in charge of what/how they want to play, not directed by adults/coach/teachers. By themselves or with their peers, they learn to find their own fun, be their own boss, problem solve, negotiate and resolve conflicts. Ideally this play is outside, in nature, screen free. Sure toss in some props for them like skipping rope/ball/buckets but nothing extravagant. Tough as we head into Fall and Winter but bundle them up and send them outside!

As parents, we register them in fewer programs, save some money, chauffeur them around less, more sanity in the household. They might complain of boredom but that’s ok, it’s a chance for them to find things that interest them, and ways to occupy their time. When they get their energy/wiggles out in this free time, they will focus better when it’s time to settle down and do some work.

The Principal cites all sorts of research backing this up (sorry please Google it, cant rattle them off the top of my head). We made the shift and noticed more harmonious interactions in the family. I know this doesn’t sound like a direct solution to your current challenges but it’s worth looking at the big picture and seeing if this could benefit your family.
Member
Feb 13, 2017
297 posts
128 upvotes
Mississauga
Thank you, I will definitely try this. My kids love being outdoors, but I don’t, and I’m currently expecting making it even harder. Luckily the grandparents take them outdoors often. I will definitely try to do what you have said. Do you think the activities that I have listed are too much for my 6 year old (martial arts 2x, swimming 1x, religious school Friday nights).
stoppy wrote: Does anyone have any tips on what might help? We have cut down considerably on screen time as I noticed that would make him more fidgety and less likely to focus. He already goes for martial arts 2x a week and swimming 1x. I also notice focus issues in the extracurriculars as he just wants to play and not listen to the instructor.
My kids’ principal raves about the benefits of unstructured play time for primary age kids instead of homework.
Unstructured play is when kids are in charge of what/how they want to play, not directed by adults/coach/teachers. By themselves or with their peers, they learn to find their own fun, be their own boss, problem solve, negotiate and resolve conflicts. Ideally this play is outside, in nature, screen free. Sure toss in some props for them like skipping rope/ball/buckets but nothing extravagant. Tough as we head into Fall and Winter but bundle them up and send them outside!

As parents, we register them in fewer programs, save some money, chauffeur them around less, more sanity in the household. They might complain of boredom but that’s ok, it’s a chance for them to find things that interest them, and ways to occupy their time. When they get their energy/wiggles out in this free time, they will focus better when it’s time to settle down and do some work.

The Principal cites all sorts of research backing this up (sorry please Google it, cant rattle them off the top of my head). We made the shift and noticed more harmonious interactions in the family. I know this doesn’t sound like a direct solution to your current challenges but it’s worth looking at the big picture and seeing if this could benefit your family.
[/quote]
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2013
3429 posts
1223 upvotes
Woodbridge
Arias1619 wrote: Thank you for those who posted their advice on this. I’m also struggling with my grade 1 son. The issue here isn’t too much homework but lack of focus. It’s extremely exhausting to keep reminding him to focus, especially with another child and one more on the way. Does anyone have any tips on what might help? We have cut down considerably on screen time as I noticed that would make him more fidgety and less likely to focus. He already goes for martial arts 2x a week and swimming 1x. I also notice focus issues in the extracurriculars as he just wants to play and not listen to the instructor.
What is it that you want him to focus on, and what's his incentive for providing that focus? It's difficult for adults to focus on things that we find meaningless and boring. The difference is that we've developed strategies to sit through those things in a way that doesn't disturb others. Why would we expect a 6-year-old to be able to focus on things that he doesn't find interesting? Does he enjoy martial arts and swimming? Who made the choice to enrol him in those activities instead of others? Are there any activities that he's experienced at school that he might want to try?

Developmentally, there are huge differences between children of that age. You could find ten different 6-year-olds that have vast differences in behaviour and attention. It's possible that what you're observing is within the typical range of children that age. Has his teacher expressed any concerns? Sometimes parents have certain ideas of what is or isn't "typical" for a child, but your son's teachers would have had experience with hundreds or thousands of children. I'd reach out to the school to see if they're noticing any concerns in the classroom and if so, what strategies they've tried to implement.
Member
Jun 23, 2006
360 posts
127 upvotes
Arias1619 wrote: Thank you, I will definitely try this. My kids love being outdoors, but I don’t, and I’m currently expecting making it even harder. Luckily the grandparents take them outdoors often. I will definitely try to do what you have said. Do you think the activities that I have listed are too much for my 6 year old (martial arts 2x, swimming 1x, religious school Friday nights).
Is he tired or cranky at 3:00? by dinner time? Are you having meals in the car? Sleeping enough? Ultimately, you're the best judge of what is too much/just right/not enough for your kids. Some kids are exhausted after the day at school, some kids need more.

What I took away from the principal's advice are:
- kids need to have age-appropriate autonomy to help them establish their voice and identity. They have few opportunities to do this if they're "bossed around" by adults all day at school, after school in extracurricular activities, and then by parents at home.
- to be more selective about what occupies the precious hours that (working) parents have with their young kids,
- more extracurricular activity is not necessarily better, despite what other parents say
- everyone needs down time and it's perfectly fine to do NOTHING after a long day/week/term at work/school. Be intentional about scheduling in time to pause and play, yes for rest and for fun.

Right now we are balancing the "fear of missing out" with happier, quality family time. So they might not get to do soccer/dance/kumon/etc like their friends but they are getting more people skills, soft skills, independence, self-efficacy, etc. Don't get me wrong, my kids still go to Girl Guides and music class once a week, where it is adult-directed but we're selective about it. Socrates said "The unexamined life is not worth living". It's easy to get caught up in the flurry of busy-ness but it's more worthwhile to engage in things that are truly meaningful to you and your family.
Deal Addict
Jan 2, 2015
2051 posts
1461 upvotes
NOT centre of Univer…
Both my kids have had amazing focus, it was commented even then they were in preschool. I would like to take credit that it was my perfect parenting, but most likely it was from I got lucky with awesome kids and figured how to work with them (though not always perfectly). My kids are older at 10 & 13, and their focus and planning is stronger than most kids I see.

Here's my long random list of somethings that may have helped (or maybe not, but I remember reading about a lot of these things)
- Keep technology away from them as long as possible. This is ANYTHING with a screen, TV's, ipads, computer, phones, etc. My older didn't watch anything except a planned family movie until almost 5. My youngest got a little screen time at about two, only because she was near my oldest. My kids were not even allowed near screens when at friends houses. If other kids were playing video games, we brought interactive games. Our kids had no choice but to read, puzzles, crafts, plays. Even their toys were generally non-electric. There is not much that can compete with the allure of technology. I find that now that my kids have tech available, and if they are on it too much, they lose focus and become agitated. We even do tech detoxes every few months. All homework complete before the weekend, and then no tech. My kids are usually pretty well behaved, but I can even see the difference after a tech detox. They often rediscover things that they loved like old books, drawing, games, etc.

- When young, we did a lot of free play that was structured. So not in classes, but there was still some structure such as crafts, coloring, reading, puppet time, cooking, etc. They could choose what they wanted to do, and then there was usually some sort of 'outcome' like cupcakes, a drawing, presenting a puppet show.
- Free quiet was also scheduled. Weird, but they were a time for at least 30 minutes, they had to quietly entertain themselves. This was so I could get some stuff done and have a little peace. It was also there to teach them to self regulate. A timer was set and unless their was blood or injury, they couldn't bother me. They would go well past 30 minutes sometimes because they found something interesting to do but it couldn't be disruptive or loud.
-My kids were always in activities, but usually to compliment different interests. We had an 'artist' one like drama or piano, a sport, and girl guides which covers a little of everything, and because I have always been a leader, I have a lot of input so it's well rounded.

For planning, homework, and focus... you should look up 'executive skills'. I didn't know what it was as a parent, but have been finding out that my kids have a lot of them, and I have been unknowing helping them build them.
- we have always had routines from a baby to now. We will go over what their day was when they were old enough.
- Have them help write out their routine. When my toddler was 3, she would write her own 'day plans' Wake up, eat, poop, read, play, nap, written 3 times. We continued this when she started full day school. She had a little day magnetic calendar (Melissa and doug) where on Sunday, we would create the schedule for the week. Every day, she had the same routine that as soon as she gets home from school, she would have her snack, do her 'chores', and her homework or responsibilities. The expectation was by the time I got home from work, piano practice was complete, chores were done, reading was done.

In terms of completing homework - some of the things we have done since preschool
- Schedule time after school to do homework and music If there isn't any, then quiet reading for at least 20 minutes (their choice of what ever they wanted)
- We didn't help with homework content unless they made a clear effort. However, I would help in approaching the homework. So I would give them strategies on how they could answer questions (take the easy ones, see if there are hints, is a place you can find clues).
- Breaking larger assignments down has been a huge help when they get stuck. If they got stuck on one question. and it looked long, we would split out the time just for that one question, then give it a rest. Now with larger assignments, my kids are pretty good a breaking down the work into packages and then deciding when they will do it based on their schedule. An example of this in the lower grades would be, there are 20 questions and it feels like it will take forever. How about lets do 5 questions now, then another 5 before dinner, then 10 when we come home from swimming. Little takes and targets really help focus.

We are a pretty busy family, but that's because the kids have choosen to be such. When the youngest was dying to try a new sport, we didn't have the time, she researched it, found a night where it could work, asked about our schedules and readjusted her plan. As a result we agreed to let her be on the team, but she has to stay on top of everything else. For her, it's her motivation to stay focused.
-
On a 'smart' device that isn't always so smart. So please forgive the autocorrects and typos. If it bothers you, then don't read my posts, but don't waste my time correcting me. If you can get past the typos, then my posts generally have some value.
Member
Feb 13, 2017
297 posts
128 upvotes
Mississauga
This sounds absolutely amazing. Great job mama!
Macx2mommy wrote: Both my kids have had amazing focus, it was commented even then they were in preschool. I would like to take credit that it was my perfect parenting, but most likely it was from I got lucky with awesome kids and figured how to work with them (though not always perfectly). My kids are older at 10 & 13, and their focus and planning is stronger than most kids I see.

Here's my long random list of somethings that may have helped (or maybe not, but I remember reading about a lot of these things)
- Keep technology away from them as long as possible. This is ANYTHING with a screen, TV's, ipads, computer, phones, etc. My older didn't watch anything except a planned family movie until almost 5. My youngest got a little screen time at about two, only because she was near my oldest. My kids were not even allowed near screens when at friends houses. If other kids were playing video games, we brought interactive games. Our kids had no choice but to read, puzzles, crafts, plays. Even their toys were generally non-electric. There is not much that can compete with the allure of technology. I find that now that my kids have tech available, and if they are on it too much, they lose focus and become agitated. We even do tech detoxes every few months. All homework complete before the weekend, and then no tech. My kids are usually pretty well behaved, but I can even see the difference after a tech detox. They often rediscover things that they loved like old books, drawing, games, etc.

- When young, we did a lot of free play that was structured. So not in classes, but there was still some structure such as crafts, coloring, reading, puppet time, cooking, etc. They could choose what they wanted to do, and then there was usually some sort of 'outcome' like cupcakes, a drawing, presenting a puppet show.
- Free quiet was also scheduled. Weird, but they were a time for at least 30 minutes, they had to quietly entertain themselves. This was so I could get some stuff done and have a little peace. It was also there to teach them to self regulate. A timer was set and unless their was blood or injury, they couldn't bother me. They would go well past 30 minutes sometimes because they found something interesting to do but it couldn't be disruptive or loud.
-My kids were always in activities, but usually to compliment different interests. We had an 'artist' one like drama or piano, a sport, and girl guides which covers a little of everything, and because I have always been a leader, I have a lot of input so it's well rounded.

For planning, homework, and focus... you should look up 'executive skills'. I didn't know what it was as a parent, but have been finding out that my kids have a lot of them, and I have been unknowing helping them build them.
- we have always had routines from a baby to now. We will go over what their day was when they were old enough.
- Have them help write out their routine. When my toddler was 3, she would write her own 'day plans' Wake up, eat, poop, read, play, nap, written 3 times. We continued this when she started full day school. She had a little day magnetic calendar (Melissa and doug) where on Sunday, we would create the schedule for the week. Every day, she had the same routine that as soon as she gets home from school, she would have her snack, do her 'chores', and her homework or responsibilities. The expectation was by the time I got home from work, piano practice was complete, chores were done, reading was done.

In terms of completing homework - some of the things we have done since preschool
- Schedule time after school to do homework and music If there isn't any, then quiet reading for at least 20 minutes (their choice of what ever they wanted)
- We didn't help with homework content unless they made a clear effort. However, I would help in approaching the homework. So I would give them strategies on how they could answer questions (take the easy ones, see if there are hints, is a place you can find clues).
- Breaking larger assignments down has been a huge help when they get stuck. If they got stuck on one question. and it looked long, we would split out the time just for that one question, then give it a rest. Now with larger assignments, my kids are pretty good a breaking down the work into packages and then deciding when they will do it based on their schedule. An example of this in the lower grades would be, there are 20 questions and it feels like it will take forever. How about lets do 5 questions now, then another 5 before dinner, then 10 when we come home from swimming. Little takes and targets really help focus.

We are a pretty busy family, but that's because the kids have choosen to be such. When the youngest was dying to try a new sport, we didn't have the time, she researched it, found a night where it could work, asked about our schedules and readjusted her plan. As a result we agreed to let her be on the team, but she has to stay on top of everything else. For her, it's her motivation to stay focused.
-
Member
Feb 13, 2017
297 posts
128 upvotes
Mississauga
Thank you for this. It’s very helpful and meaningful advice. Definitely a lot to think about this weekend.
stoppy wrote: Is he tired or cranky at 3:00? by dinner time? Are you having meals in the car? Sleeping enough? Ultimately, you're the best judge of what is too much/just right/not enough for your kids. Some kids are exhausted after the day at school, some kids need more.

What I took away from the principal's advice are:
- kids need to have age-appropriate autonomy to help them establish their voice and identity. They have few opportunities to do this if they're "bossed around" by adults all day at school, after school in extracurricular activities, and then by parents at home.
- to be more selective about what occupies the precious hours that (working) parents have with their young kids,
- more extracurricular activity is not necessarily better, despite what other parents say
- everyone needs down time and it's perfectly fine to do NOTHING after a long day/week/term at work/school. Be intentional about scheduling in time to pause and play, yes for rest and for fun.

Right now we are balancing the "fear of missing out" with happier, quality family time. So they might not get to do soccer/dance/kumon/etc like their friends but they are getting more people skills, soft skills, independence, self-efficacy, etc. Don't get me wrong, my kids still go to Girl Guides and music class once a week, where it is adult-directed but we're selective about it. Socrates said "The unexamined life is not worth living". It's easy to get caught up in the flurry of busy-ness but it's more worthwhile to engage in things that are truly meaningful to you and your family.
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2013
3429 posts
1223 upvotes
Woodbridge
Here is another resource that some might find useful. It's designed for Special Ed teachers when we write IEPs to guide us in selecting appropriate accommodations for a specific need or exceptionality. Even though we use this in the spec ed world, accommodations are given to all students, not just those with a diagnosed exceptionality or an IEP. This page lets you choose to see accommodations based on Student Need, Exceptionality, or Diagnosis. For example, if you're trying to find ways to support your child's time management skills, you can follow the Student Needs link, click on Time Management Skills and see a list of instructional, environmental, and assessment accommodations and strategies that can address this particular skill. "Chunking" assessments into smaller, more manageable tasks is exactly what @Macx2mommy described above. A visual schedule also works for students. This can be a physical printed schedule or an electronic version. You could sit down with your child and have them look up gifs or cartoons or emojis or memes etc. that represent a certain task and use those to create a schedule. For some people, children and adults, not knowing how long a particular task will take or not knowing what come safter can lead to aggitation. A visual schedule will help a child see that they have some preferred activity scheduled after they finish their homework and it may provide motivation to get their homework done.

Top