Food & Drink

Too much Sodium in Bread

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Deal Addict
Dec 6, 2008
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Too much Sodium in Bread

Is there a reason almost any brand of bread you pick either off the shelf or bakery has considerable amount of sodium. Atleast 130mg per slice if you look at nutrition facts.

Has anyone come across a low sodium bread in Alberta stores (like cobs bread)?
37 replies
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Jul 7, 2017
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itemsale2003 wrote: Is there a reason almost any brand of bread you pick either off the shelf or bakery has considerable amount of sodium. Atleast 130mg per slice if you look at nutrition facts.

Has anyone come across a low sodium bread in Alberta stores (like cobs bread)?
Probably due to using baking soda/powder as a riser instead of yeast? Can buy yeast-leavened bread at a good bakery though it'll probably cost you (time required to rise and proof), or do what many have been doing and make your own (bread machine will work). Can even make it w/o any added salt though it can taste insipid and bland.
I smile when I see container ships sailing past my house laden with stuff made in China
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Feb 9, 2012
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itemsale2003 wrote: Is there a reason almost any brand of bread you pick either off the shelf or bakery has considerable amount of sodium. Atleast 130mg per slice if you look at nutrition facts.

Has anyone come across a low sodium bread in Alberta stores (like cobs bread)?
I didn't read correctly at first and panicked! I saw 270mg sodium.
Good thing I read again, it's per two slices.
That's STILL 135mg per slice!
Ironically, that's the Dempsters "Double Flax" bread, which is supposed to be healthy! lol
If it ain't broke, don't fix it!
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Aug 29, 2011
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Salt is a cheap way to add flavour. I’ve had low sodium bread before and on it’s own it was pretty tasteless.
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May 18, 2009
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we buy Stonemill bread. Some has more or less, depending which variety you choose.
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Mar 11, 2004
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itemsale2003 wrote: Is there a reason almost any brand of bread you pick either off the shelf or bakery has considerable amount of sodium. Atleast 130mg per slice if you look at nutrition facts.

Has anyone come across a low sodium bread in Alberta stores (like cobs bread)?
Baking your own bread is stupid simple and a rewarding process. Bake your own and you need nothing but flour, water, salt (optional but flavour) and yeast. Look up artisan no kneed bread recipe and get going.
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Sep 1, 2005
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playnicee1 wrote: I didn't read correctly at first and panicked! I saw 270mg sodium.
Good thing I read again, it's per two slices.
That's STILL 135mg per slice!
Ironically, that's the Dempsters "Double Flax" bread, which is supposed to be healthy! lol
Looking up nutrition facts.

75g for 2 slice portion (75,000mg)
270mg of sodium. That's milligram not grams.
=> 0.36% salt.

My homemade bread is usually 1% salt as a percentage of the flour content for reference. At 70% hydration, the salt content is 0.58% of the flour/water b4 baking.
I never weighed my bread after baking...anyone? I think that 0.36% salt likely is not way out of line.
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Feb 9, 2012
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gr8dlr wrote: Looking up nutrition facts.

75g for 2 slice portion (75,000mg)
270mg of sodium. That's milligram not grams.
=> 0.36% salt.

My homemade bread is usually 1% salt as a percentage of the flour content for reference. At 70% hydration, the salt content is 0.58% of the flour/water b4 baking.
I never weighed my bread after baking...anyone? I think that 0.36% salt likely is not way out of line.
Why have sodium at all? No taste? Any healthier alternatives?

How to convert Milligrams to Grams
1 milligram (mg) is equal to 1/1000 grams (g).

1 mg = (1/1000) g = 0.001 g

The mass m in grams (g) is equal to the mass m in milligrams (mg) divided by 1000:

m(g) = m(mg) / 1000

Example
Convert 5mg to grams:

m(g) = 5 mg / 1000 = 0.005 g
https://www.rapidtables.com/convert/wei ... -gram.html
If it ain't broke, don't fix it!
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Jul 7, 2017
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It all adds up. U.S. F.D.A. recommends a maximum of 2,300 mg, which apparently most exceed by over 1,000 mg.

This has good information including the other sodium sources (mass-produced bread has sodium bicarbonate).

https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-life ... t-20045479
I smile when I see container ships sailing past my house laden with stuff made in China
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gr8dlr wrote: My homemade bread is usually 1% salt as a percentage of the flour content for reference. At 70% , the salt content is 0.58% of the flour/water b4 baking.
I never weighed my bread after baking...anyone? I think that 0.36% salt likely is not way out of line.
My recipe is 7g for a 2lb loaf (907g) but I usually use less than that (I hope).
I smile when I see container ships sailing past my house laden with stuff made in China
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Oct 7, 2012
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itemsale2003 wrote: Is there a reason almost any brand of bread you pick either off the shelf or bakery has considerable amount of sodium. Atleast 130mg per slice if you look at nutrition facts.

Has anyone come across a low sodium bread in Alberta stores (like cobs bread)?
are you diabetic or high blood pressure?

here in QC i get a bread from Metro.. low sugar and salt, but is expensive and slices are thinner lol... will try to find you brand
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Sep 1, 2005
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playnicee1 wrote: Why have sodium at all? No taste? Any healthier alternatives?

How to convert Milligrams to Grams
1 milligram (mg) is equal to 1/1000 grams (g).

1 mg = (1/1000) g = 0.001 g

The mass m in grams (g) is equal to the mass m in milligrams (mg) divided by 1000:

m(g) = m(mg) / 1000

Example
Convert 5mg to grams:

m(g) = 5 mg / 1000 = 0.005 g
https://www.rapidtables.com/convert/wei ... -gram.html
Try making your own bread without salt...and you'll see why you can't exclude it. I've done it by accident (ie forgot to add salt) and it's not "GOOD EATS".

12% of your daily needs from 2 slices of bread which is breakfast for many is not out of line as breakfast is one of three meals in a day.
Eg Daily salt in a day...20% at breakfast, 35% at lunch and 45% at dinner perhaps.

Keep in mind anything bought prepared is generally higher salt than if you make your own...which is why those who eat a lot of prepared are typically high salt consumers and those who make their meals from scratch are probably lower salt consumers.
We're all bozos on the bus until we find a way to express ourselves...

Failure is always an option...just not the preferred one!
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If you are east Asian or eat an east Asian diet, don't forget that other major possible source, soy sauce.
I smile when I see container ships sailing past my house laden with stuff made in China
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Nov 15, 2008
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gr8dlr wrote: Try making your own bread without salt...and you'll see why you can't exclude it. I've done it by accident (ie forgot to add salt) and it's not "GOOD EATS".
Yes, salt not only controls the rising process so it is needed chemically but it adds significant needed flavour. Otherwise you may as well play with papier mache & eat the paste. (I made white bread without salt just to see what would happen & when I tried to unload it on the local ducks, even they would not eat it.)

There are sourdough ryes that have no salt or baking soda/powder in them though, like Dimpflmeier.

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Jan 9, 2011
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thriftshopper wrote: If you are east Asian or eat an east Asian diet, don't forget that other major possible source, soy sauce.
...which is loaded with salt. My bottle of Kikkoman says that one tablespoon (15 mL) has 960mg of sodium, which is 2.4g of salt.
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Kiraly wrote: Have you ever forgotten to add the salt to your homemade bread? It's inedible!
I have, a few times. Some a mistake (I've also forgotten to add yeast), some deliberate. It actually isn't too bad if you've been on a low sodium diet.
I smile when I see container ships sailing past my house laden with stuff made in China
Sr. Member
Jul 24, 2019
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Canada
itemsale2003 wrote: Is there a reason almost any brand of bread you pick either off the shelf or bakery has considerable amount of sodium. Atleast 130mg per slice if you look at nutrition facts.

Has anyone come across a low sodium bread in Alberta stores (like cobs bread)?
maybe eat a half slice at breakfast and half slice at lunch
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Mar 11, 2004
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Kiraly wrote: Have you ever forgotten to add the salt to your homemade bread? It's inedible!
Plenty of times. But I never make plain white bread, and love the flavour yeast gives.
Plus no one eats plain bread and whatever you top it with, will most likely have salt in it or you can always sprinkle salt on top.

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