Automotive

Tools needed for tire changeover...Feedback please!

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  • Dec 24th, 2019 12:06 pm
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Dec 27, 2011
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Tools needed for tire changeover...Feedback please!

I know little about cars and have always brought it to a garage to get oil/tire changes, but I feel like the semi-annual winter/all-season tire changeover is something I can do myself.
Not only will I save money in the long run, but it's more inconvenient and I figure it's just good knowledge to have.
That being said...I'd like some feedback on all the required tools I need. I have basically no tools at all so I'm starting from scratch. I drive a sedan btw.

1) Torque wrench: $20. https://www.princessauto.com/en/detail/ ... -p8533168e
Found this from a thread on RFD. This should be sufficient, correct?

2) Jack: $21. https://www.princessauto.com/en/detail/ ... -p8036709e
Could I save money and just use the scissor jack that came with my car or is that not safe to use multiple times? If I need to buy one, the one above looks to be a very basic jack...is this good enough? I'm seeing various other types for upwards of several hundred dollars but I'd rather not spend that much if something basic will do the job.

3) Jack stands: $26 https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/cert ... 0010p.html
Any reason to get more expensive ones?

4) Breaker bar: $14. https://www.princessauto.com/en/detail/ ... -p8254989e
Is this the correct size I'll need?

5) Socket: I have some smaller sockets but nothing that'll fit the lug nuts on my car. How would I determine the correct size socket to buy? I can't exactly take a lug nut off my wheel and bring it into a store to put into sockets until one fits. I tried checking my owner's manual but couldn't find it. Also, I assume just buying any socket (correct size of course) is fine? Or are there special wheel sockets I'm supposed to get?

6) Wheel chock: I was thinking of just using a piece of wood or brick...or is it recommended to get an actual wheel chock?

Ans since I'm doing tire changes I figure I might as well try and do my own oil changes too which I’ll also need the tools for.
7) Oil: Owner's manual says I need 4.0L of 5W-20. I'm good to just buy whatever is on sale of 5W-20, correct? Also it seems they come in various sizes (5L, 4.4L, 4.73L, etc). I assume different vehicles require slightly different amounts so generally people will have a bit leftover in their jug, correct?

8) Oil filter: Is it recommended to only use genuine filters? So buy from the dealership?

9) Drain pan and funnel: Probably can just buy from Dollarama

10) Ramps: So if I'm doing tire changeovers and buying a jack and jack stands, should I use those or is it recommended to get ramps like these for $60? https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/rhin ... 6060p.html

P.S. I'm sure some people will downvote me for such a noob thread, go ahead I don't care, I'm here to learn Smiling Face With Sunglasses
74 replies
Sr. Member
Feb 17, 2015
798 posts
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Canada
Now you just need common sense and you are all set OP!
Member
Nov 10, 2015
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Thornhill, ON
crystallight wrote: I know little about cars and have always brought it to a garage to get oil/tire changes, but I feel like the semi-annual winter/all-season tire changeover is something I can do myself.
Not only will I save money in the long run, but it's more inconvenient and I figure it's just good knowledge to have.
That being said...I'd like some feedback on all the required tools I need. I have basically no tools at all so I'm starting from scratch. I drive a sedan btw.

1) Torque wrench: $20. https://www.princessauto.com/en/detail/ ... -p8533168e
Found this from a thread on RFD. This should be sufficient, correct?

2) Jack: $21. https://www.princessauto.com/en/detail/ ... -p8036709e
Could I save money and just use the scissor jack that came with my car or is that not safe to use multiple times? If I need to buy one, the one above looks to be a very basic jack...is this good enough? I'm seeing various other types for upwards of several hundred dollars but I'd rather not spend that much if something basic will do the job.

3) Jack stands: $26 https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/cert ... 0010p.html
Any reason to get more expensive ones?

4) Breaker bar: $14. https://www.princessauto.com/en/detail/ ... -p8254989e
Is this the correct size I'll need?

5) Socket: I have some smaller sockets but nothing that'll fit the lug nuts on my car. How would I determine the correct size socket to buy? I can't exactly take a lug nut off my wheel and bring it into a store to put into sockets until one fits. I tried checking my owner's manual but couldn't find it. Also, I assume just buying any socket (correct size of course) is fine? Or are there special wheel sockets I'm supposed to get?

6) Wheel chock: I was thinking of just using a piece of wood or brick...or is it recommended to get an actual wheel chock?

Ans since I'm doing tire changes I figure I might as well try and do my own oil changes too which I’ll also need the tools for.
7) Oil: Owner's manual says I need 4.0L of 5W-20. I'm good to just buy whatever is on sale of 5W-20, correct? Also it seems they come in various sizes (5L, 4.4L, 4.73L, etc). I assume different vehicles require slightly different amounts so generally people will have a bit leftover in their jug, correct?

8) Oil filter: Is it recommended to only use genuine filters? So buy from the dealership?

9) Drain pan and funnel: Probably can just buy from Dollarama

10) Ramps: So if I'm doing tire changeovers and buying a jack and jack stands, should I use those or is it recommended to get ramps like these for $60? https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/rhin ... 6060p.html

P.S. I'm sure some people will downvote me for such a noob thread, go ahead I don't care, I'm here to learn Smiling Face With Sunglasses
Torque wrench is fine
Google your car and lug nut size. Itll be either 17,19,21,22mm most likely
Invest in a quality jack. Not a trolley one. Multiple on sale ($180+) minimum 3ton, youll thank me when you start to jack it up
Jack stands are ok
Any oil on sale is good
Yes dealer for filter or can get any brand name (not fram). Dealer is usually best price too surprisingly
Dont use ramps. Lots of accidents from them
Dont waste your $ on chocks unless on an incline
Sr. Member
Sep 25, 2018
611 posts
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If you want to change your own oil, you need a oil filter wrench too:
https://www.princessauto.com/en/detail/ ... -p8031426e

As for lug nut sockets, just get a set. It's only 10 bucks more than a single socket. Make sure you get the 1/2 inch drive version (size of the square block on your wrench, don't ever use a drive converter):
https://www.princessauto.com/en/detail/ ... -p8343402e
https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/maxi ... p.html#srp

I got the Canadian Tire one for lifetime warranty (no receipt required, just bring the damaged socket in)
Last edited by AlicW93740 on Nov 26th, 2019 10:29 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Don't forget blinker fluid!!

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Where do you plan on jacking the car up? Ideally, it should be done on a hard, flat surface like the concrete pad of a garage. I personally wouldn't do it on an asphalt driveway, much less a sloped one.
Sr. Member
Jun 5, 2016
580 posts
718 upvotes
You don't need an oil filter wrench unless your filter is in a hard to reach spot. If its overtightened you can poke a screwdriver through and use that to turn the whole filter - messy but free. If you don't overtighten it you wont have any trouble getting it off yourself next time.

I agree you don't need chocks or ramps.

Your scissor jack will be fine for years and years. Most of the reviews of the jack you posted say it doesn't last a year. If you can get down to the states, Harbour Freight jacks are pretty well reviewed and very cheap. Or just use the scissor jack it's a bit annoying but I can put up with that to reduce clutter in my garage.

Jack stands - 2 ton is fine. If you have a huge truck or something you might want heavier ones but 2 ton will be fine for almost anything.

Oil - check if your car was back spec'd for 0w20. Yeah you can buy whatever is cheapest and whatever size you want and save the rest for next year. The Pennzoil synthetic for ~$22 with a $10 mail in rebate from Canadian Tire will be hard to beat.

Socket size you can probably google what size lug nuts you have, look on rock auto and see what size comes up when you search lug nuts, or ask at the parts counter.

Oil filters - buy whatever is on sale. If you're using synthetic you might want to look something designed for synthetic/designed to last for longer oil change intervals.

Everything else looks fine.
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Oct 21, 2009
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Good for you for taking this on. Once you get experienced changing tires, look into servicing your brakes.

If you feel worried about lifting the car, use your scissor jack for now. Your manual will show you the lift points. They are on the inside of the wheels, under the doors. Most cars have a beefed up spot for the scissor jack.

Standard floor jacks do not go on these lift points, you will need to find another point under your car for a floor jack - usually on a cross beam. There are many spots under the car where you should not use a floor jack or a jack stand. or you may damage your cars components.

If you go to your dealer to buy a filter, ask them to show you where the safe lift points are for using floor jacks and jack stands.

Basically, I'm just saying that if you are inexperienced, there are less things that can go wrong with using a scissor jack than a floor jack.

Also, use a drain pan like this. It will be easier to pour the used oil back into a container.

Buy synthetic oil. Whatever is on sale is fine. I usually go for Mobile 1, but I plan to keep my cars for 15+ years.


What's your plan for used motor oil?
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Dec 2, 2008
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why do you need jackstand when u are slapping on a tire as soon as old comes off?
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qaz393 wrote: why do you need jackstand when u are slapping on a tire as soon as old comes off?
In case you make a newbie mistake?
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Oct 6, 2015
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qaz393 wrote: why do you need jackstand when u are slapping on a tire as soon as old comes off?
Safety. A jack should never be used as the sole way of supporting a vehicle. And besides, one has to support both sides of the vehicle if doing a rotation. Unless they do some strange tango with winter tires and summer tires. Much easier to use jackstands (properly).
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Oct 5, 2006
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Winnipeg
crystallight wrote: 7) Oil: Owner's manual says I need 4.0L of 5W-20. I'm good to just buy whatever is on sale of 5W-20, correct? Also it seems they come in various sizes (5L, 4.4L, 4.73L, etc). I assume different vehicles require slightly different amounts so generally people will have a bit leftover in their jug, correct?

8) Oil filter: Is it recommended to only use genuine filters? So buy from the dealership?

9) Drain pan and funnel: Probably can just buy from Dollarama

10) Ramps: So if I'm doing tire changeovers and buying a jack and jack stands, should I use those or is it recommended to get ramps like these for $60? https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/rhin ... 6060p.html

P.S. I'm sure some people will downvote me for such a noob thread, go ahead I don't care, I'm here to learn Smiling Face With Sunglasses
If your car is relatively new, get crush-washers from your car dealer or if you know the exact size (google it) you can also get it from Canadian Tire or maybe PartSource.

if you're going to buy synthetic oil, consider getting 0w20, it'll run much better in Canadian winter when it's -25C outside and the synthetic will last you about 15,000KM if not more. You'll need to get a synthetic oil filter too which would last equally as long. Checkout the auto section on deals. Canadian Tire is running a super hot deal on Synthetic Pennzoil with mail rebate that's hard to beat. Usually good deals are conventional oil is about $15/5L and synthetic is about $25/5L (roughly)

For drain pan, I couldn't find cheap ones in Dollarama so I just grabbed the biggest aluminum turkey/oven pan which holds about 5L :D
Also have an empty bottle of 4L container (like 4L milk jug or ice cream bucket) to hold used oil. Make sure it's cool before you pour it back into those containers because you don't want the container to melt. This is useful in case you don't use all of your new engine oil you just bought and have no where to store used oil.

If you wanna save money on a funnel, simply empty a 500ML bottled water (like superstore bottled water) and cut it in half, and voila, a perfect funnel to pour engine oil with.

if you're getting jack stands, you don't really need ramps. Ramps are easier if you're just going to do oil change since you only need to drive up and park with E-brake.

Also, make sure you warm up your engine before you do your oil change so the oil will drain better. I made the mistake the first time of draining it cold and only about 2/3 of oil came out. Since you're changing your tires, I'd warm up the engine, turn the engine off and change the tire, then when the oil is cooled a bit change the oil.

If this is the first time, get gloves and wear clothes you don't mind throwing away. and get plenty of newspaper/flyers to put on the floor for spills. I'd also consider getting safety goggles if you're worried. and my biggest tip is don't put your head/face too close to the drain plug. position your head on the other side of the drain plug where the oil will be flowing out so it flows AWAY from your face. lol

life everyone else said, once you know how to do this, it gets addictive and you just wanna change your oil again even before it's due next time!
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Oct 29, 2009
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Spend a bit more money on a jack (mostly bad reviews for that one). This is a tool you are asking a lot from so it's worth putting a bit more into it. If you can swing it get the one from Costco; it will last you for life. I do my own changeovers (2 cars) and I would *not* want to be doing it with the scissor jack or whatever is included with your car. Not fun.

TIP: if you are jacking up a vehicle on asphalt you will need to put a piece of plywood or something under the front jack wheels. Otherwise the wheels will just dig into the asphalt and make a mess of your driveway.
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burnt69 wrote: And besides, one has to support both sides of the vehicle if doing a rotation. Unless they do some strange tango with winter tires and summer tires. Much easier to use jackstands (properly).
You don’t have to. I swap my tires corner by corner only using the jack to lift a corner at a time.
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All good questions. I’d suggest having a buddy over who has done tire changes over to help to out and let you know if you are doing things properly. Lots of little things you can miss on a forum. Also YouTube videos are usually pretty good when it comes to visually learningcar stuff like this.

I change over 3 vehicles each season in my driveway and have recently added servicing the brakes to the mix. I started doing the brakes after I’ve had a couple of piston sliders seizing issues. Pretty quick to lube the sliders and make sure the pads are moving freely.
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Feb 7, 2017
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Below are only my opinions:

1) I have a cheap Princess Auto torque wrench ($20) and a Mastercraft one ($60). I can tell you that I really like the lockable handle that the Mastercraft one has. The PA one's settings can easily get loose using the end knob. Big difference in quality.
3) Jack stands are good insurance for safety. You may have a seized/stuck tire and require some kicking or mallet blows to get off.
4) In my opinion, I would get some 1/2 drive deep sockets as they fit over the lug nuts better.
8) Aftermarket oil filter quality varies. Buying from the dealership just guarantees a certain level of quality and proper fit.
9) I would buy an oil pan that has a sprout to pour out the old oil. It really saves making a mess for a few extra dollars.
11) I would recommend buying some anti-seize and applying a little (just a little tiny bit) on the hub ring or back of the wheels where steel contact is made with a toothbrush. DO NOT APPLY ON LUG NUT THREADS as it is dangerous. It would prevent the wheel from rusting onto the hub and making removing the tires a lot easier on the next changeover. Do this at your own risk.
12) I hate washing the black oil grime off my hands, so I buy nitril gloves for oil changes. There's also mechanic's gloves.
13) I bought white tire crayon to label my tires for rotation after they are taken off. Label them on the inside wheel. it will wash off automatically when it gets exposed to rain after it is reinstalled.

Most new tire changeover DIYers are usually discouraged when they see discover surprises after trying it out themselves for the firs time:
1) Lug nuts are usually over-torqued by tire shops and are harder to remove than necessary.
2) Tires are heavy. It is quite tiring changing over tires. You have dig out all your tools and put them back. And perhaps back pain if you don't do it with good posture.
3) Tires can get seized/stuck on to the rotor which require some persuasive kicks or mallet blows.
4) The $$ invested in tools requires some usage before break even.

Not to scare you, but double check your work. I know two people who's tires fell off because they were not tightened properly. It is a very expensive repair if you are unlucky. This is also why I have the more expensive torque wrench.
Last edited by Siward44 on Nov 27th, 2019 8:58 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Or better yet, go to a friends place that has the tools and bring a case of 24's so they can help out with the tire change.

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OP, while you can and may be able to do it yourself, unless it is something that you really want to learn and continuously do, use a local mechanic. Oil changes and tire swaps are not that expensive and to be honest, less work and headache. Where are you going to dispose of the used oil/filter? Canadian Tire and the sorts will not accept your left overs. It's a pain in the bum to get under a Hyundai, so getting it on ramps by yourself could be challenging. I used to do all my own oil changes but after buying oil and filter and disposal, it was just more efficient to bring it my mechanic. I bring oil/filter and $20 later I'm on my way.

IMO of course.
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derass wrote: Where do you plan on jacking the car up? Ideally, it should be done on a hard, flat surface like the concrete pad of a garage. I personally wouldn't do it on an asphalt driveway, much less a sloped one.
I do it on both. The Jackstands do sink into the asphalt, but only like 1/4 inch. That can be mitigated by putting it ontop of a piece of wood. Incline isnt too steep and I got Chokes + Handbrake
koffey wrote: OP, while you can and may be able to do it yourself, unless it is something that you really want to learn and continuously do, use a local mechanic. Oil changes and tire swaps are not that expensive and to be honest, less work and headache. Where are you going to dispose of the used oil/filter? Canadian Tire and the sorts will not accept your left overs. It's a pain in the bum to get under a Hyundai, so getting it on ramps by yourself could be challenging. I used to do all my own oil changes but after buying oil and filter and disposal, it was just more efficient to bring it my mechanic. I bring oil/filter and $20 later I'm on my way.

IMO of course.
Most oil shops will take the used oil ( i know walmart will). For the filter i know my tuning shop takes it back. So yes a headache if you don't know. Im still young enough with not enough commitments and responsibilities that I can get away with waiting a few hours doing it myself and cleaning the wheel wells and wheels. But yes not worth your time unless you got a real attachment to your car.
Last edited by sebakaa on Nov 27th, 2019 9:04 am, edited 1 time in total.
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koffey wrote: OP, while you can and may be able to do it yourself, unless it is something that you really want to learn and continuously do, use a local mechanic. Oil changes and tire swaps are not that expensive and to be honest, less work and headache. Where are you going to dispose of the used oil/filter? Canadian Tire and the sorts will not accept your left overs. It's a pain in the bum to get under a Hyundai, so getting it on ramps by yourself could be challenging. I used to do all my own oil changes but after buying oil and filter and disposal, it was just more efficient to bring it my mechanic. I bring oil/filter and $20 later I'm on my way.

IMO of course.
I order a free toxic cab to pickup the used bottles of oil after I accumulate more than 4 bottles. They come take it away for free.

Yes. I agree with you. I sometimes wonder why I just don't pay someone to do it. I have been changing my oil/tires for 6 years now. Tire swaps and oil changes can go as low as $40. Changing oil yourself is about $20-$40 in parts alone. My OEM oil filter is $7 and a bottle of conventional oil is $16. The mechanic is making very little off oil changes.
Last edited by Siward44 on Nov 27th, 2019 9:09 am, edited 1 time in total.

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