Entrepreneurship & Small Business

Top corporate dog to entrepreneur - please help

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Top corporate dog to entrepreneur - please help

A little background: I play an executive management role in operations in a large international corporate. Always have. Always commended. Can think strategically as well as execute quite flawlessly.

Didn't study much (boring) but am typically top of the class at work and come up to speed extremely quickly.

Saying this not to boast, but just to give you a picture of who I am and what I've done. There's more but that's a little glance.

So I work hard - very hard - much more than my colleagues because I care about the work, I care about quality, I care about professionalism. Most of my colleagues I noticed don't do the work but any time anyone senior speaks, they say the "right stuff". I'm tired of the corpoate game, as good as I am, I do it based on blood sweat and tears. I don't suck up to anyone - I'm valued for talent and outcomes - that's it. I say hi to the cleaner and treat everyone well. I don't "say the right thing". I do the right thing and don't try to get credit.

These days I think why I am working so hard and doing so much more than others when I can put my extensively tested range of skills to earn money for myself. I would say my skillset is stakeholder relationships, strategy, management, communication skills, very smart, can execute flawlessly, excellent planner, project management, analysis of data, kind of very broad skills.

And this is where I falter - innovation. I have worked for so long in mega big companies earning good money and doing things for the top guy that I don't know how to step sideways.

Can anyone please help me with the flaws in my logic, or ideas on how to even start building that bridge.
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When I read through your post, I am reminded of quite a few of the consultants I meet with. They are often people that get bored at their job, tired of just doing the same-old same-old, and instead want to be a part of new and exciting projects where they are valued for their expertise and people actually pay attention to it.

A lot of their opportunities comes from networking - these people are always the outgoing people at the networking events and participating in the discussions/topic. They are always working the room - handing out business cards, adding you on LinkedIn, etc. And it makes sense - if I need someone who is an expert in that field, why wouldn't I hire one of them if my impression was positive? Many have contracts with very large companies (I'm out west, so they are mostly multi-billion dollar oil/gas companies) and are able to be easily hired because of the size of the company (more autonomy within a department for these things).

In the end, if you are going at it on your own I think your focus is on networking with employees that are influential in companies you are targeting. If this is difficult, then perhaps you should explore joining a smaller company of consultants in your field - being in a management role I am sure you have dealt with many of these companies and would have connections in them.
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I've never done consulting before though - should I try? That sounds like another company :D
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You've told us what you're good at, but nothing about what you enjoy or excites you. You might be the most accomplished stacker of blocks in the world, but if you don't enjoy heights and climbing ladders, you'd make a poor mason.

Without passion for whatever you choose to do for yourself, it's not going to end well.
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canucky1 wrote: A little background: I play an executive management role in operations in a large international corporate. Always have. Always commended. Can think strategically as well as execute quite flawlessly.

Didn't study much (boring) but am typically top of the class at work and come up to speed extremely quickly.

Saying this not to boast, but just to give you a picture of who I am and what I've done. There's more but that's a little glance.

So I work hard - very hard - much more than my colleagues because I care about the work, I care about quality, I care about professionalism. Most of my colleagues I noticed don't do the work but any time anyone senior speaks, they say the "right stuff". I'm tired of the corpoate game, as good as I am, I do it based on blood sweat and tears. I don't suck up to anyone - I'm valued for talent and outcomes - that's it. I say hi to the cleaner and treat everyone well. I don't "say the right thing". I do the right thing and don't try to get credit.

These days I think why I am working so hard and doing so much more than others when I can put my extensively tested range of skills to earn money for myself. I would say my skillset is stakeholder relationships, strategy, management, communication skills, very smart, can execute flawlessly, excellent planner, project management, analysis of data, kind of very broad skills.

And this is where I falter - innovation. I have worked for so long in mega big companies earning good money and doing things for the top guy that I don't know how to step sideways.

Can anyone please help me with the flaws in my logic, or ideas on how to even start building that bridge.
I've done both sides of the coin. Started out as an entrepreneur and built many companies. I then did a very brief foray into the corporate world because the offer was just too enticing but moreover I did it on a lark because I just wanted to see what the 'other side' was like. I hated it. I felt the same as you do now. I could not stomach that someone not as smart as me, not willing to take risks as I would, not entrepreneurial, who never had skin in the game really, who played corporate politics, etc etc. was someone I had to report to so I exited and went back to building companies. I also wanted all the upside to be mostly mine, not mostly someone else's. I've started 9 so far, 6 successful, 2 failures (which were blessings in disguise as I learned a lot from them, probably more than from my successes) and one that I started recently that is doing very well now.

I think entrepreneurs are born not made. I am not saying you can't be one but your bio suggests otherwise. Why have you not done it before?

It's a VERY different world when you do not have a regular paycheck to rely on and the support of an existing organization. It's very difficult to face possible failure. There is a lot of tough slogging and long hours when you are an entrepreneur. You can lose a lot of money. Your friends think you are crazy to leave a cushy job. Many think your idea is not that great because if it was that compelling they say 'others would have done it already' (never a good reason for not doing something). You'll get criticism left right and centre. You will second guess yourself if things are not going well. Finally, you don't say hi to the cleaner. You ARE the cleaner!

I wouldn't have it any other way. I have loved every minute of being an entrepreneur. I answer only to myself and my customers. Also, I have made a lot of money, but I have to say the landscape is littered with those who have lost a lot of money being an entrepreneur and are paying off their losses and debts for years as a result.

Good luck. It can be tough 'out there' without a steady job.
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Lacklustre wrote: You've told us what you're good at, but nothing about what you enjoy or excites you. You might be the most accomplished stacker of blocks in the world, but if you don't enjoy heights and climbing ladders, you'd make a poor mason.

Without passion for whatever you choose to do for yourself, it's not going to end well.
Yes good point, Thanks Lastlustre for pointing it out.

This is what (genuinely) excites me:

1. Excellence (boring I know but I like doing things well - I like that feeling of executing well) - probably not so relevant for this topic
2. People - I like supporting people to grow either professionally or personally
3. Humane causes - I feel for people who are poor or who are good but just don't have the opportunity. I feel for people who are looking for a way out of suffering. - Again really bad for any business idea
4. Happiness - I like to see people happy and I like to protect people who are taken advantage of because they are in a disadvantaged situation (my alternative was law but I'm too old to be assed to do that)

This is probably why I've never done anything.
Go Raptors, Go!
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eonibm wrote: I've done both sides of the coin. Started out as an entrepreneur and built many companies. I then did a very brief foray into the corporate world because the offer was just too enticing but moreover I did it on a lark because I just wanted to see what the 'other side' was like. I hated it. I felt the same as you do now. I could not stomach that someone not as smart as me, not willing to take risks as I would, not entrepreneurial, who never had skin in the game really, who played corporate politics, etc etc. was someone I had to report to so I exited and went back to building companies. I also wanted all the upside to be mostly mine, not mostly someone else's. I've started 9 so far, 6 successful, 2 failures (which were blessings in disguise as I learned a lot from them, probably more than from my successes) and one that I started recently that is doing very well now.

I think entrepreneurs are born not made. I am not saying you can't be one but your bio suggests otherwise. Why have you not done it before?

It's a VERY different world when you do not have a regular paycheck to rely on and the support of an existing organization. It's very difficult to face possible failure. There is a lot of tough slogging and long hours when you are an entrepreneur. You can lose a lot of money. Your friends think you are crazy to leave a cushy job. Many think your idea is not that great because if it was that compelling they say 'others would have done it already' (never a good reason for not doing something). You'll get criticism left right and centre. You will second guess yourself if things are not going well. Finally, you don't say hi to the cleaner. You ARE the cleaner!

I wouldn't have it any other way. I have loved every minute of being an entrepreneur. I answer only to myself and my customers. Also, I have made a lot of money, but I have to say the landscape is littered with those who have lost a lot of money being an entrepreneur and are paying off their losses and debts for years as a result.

Good luck. It can be tough 'out there' without a steady job.
eonibm

Thank you for sharing your views, I have a lot of respect for you just on the forum and for being a voice of reason and smart/fair.

You are right - this is what I ask myself too:

"I think entrepreneurs are born not made. I am not saying you can't be one but your bio suggests otherwise. Why have you not done it before?"

I would say my upbringing was always to be a worker bee - I was not exposed to the "world" until my 20s and had quite a sheltered upbringing and even then, I think I was complacent and just did what it took to go through the milestones put in front of me. I excelled at a course that was given - school and career and all that jazz.

I think I was lazy and never considered/thought I could do anything other than the track that was put in front of me.

I am lazy - but if I have a job or give a commitment, I take it very seriously for everyone concerned. I think for the other person (I realized I am different again because I see most people just think for themselves and everything they do is for themself) & I am prepared to work all hours to make it a good product/outcome.

eonibm - do you have a high level course outline for things to look for or high level steps - I know it's a big ask but as I am un-innovative I think it would help me determine whether I can follow a new course. PM works too if you are inclined.

When I see myself, and from feedback I have, there's no reason I can't. My v. successful uni friends still ask me why I am not a CEO. I am not saying this to say I am good, but just to add some color as to "who I am"- I usually hate talking about myself but recognize this is important for this thread

It took years to see qualities in myself - bosses always loved me and I went up very quickly to senior levels but I was uninspired by that which I saw (game playing, politics, uncompetent people) - but I see that I am very competent now and I have great qualities - not just as a corporate person but as a human.

Anyway thanks FWIW.
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canucky1,
Have you ever considered the path of finding a problem that you're passionate about and which needs to be solved in order to work for yourself?
You need the "passion" part otherwise your journey will end prematurely.
And you need the "problem" part to define what you're actually going to be doing.
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canucky1 wrote: I've never done consulting before though - should I try? That sounds like another company :D
Consulting companies are full of people like yourself that are tired of working for a corporate culture and instead want to work on their own. Working for a consulting company, even a smaller one, allows you access to work that you do not have to spend the time finding yourself. Instead, you stick to what you are good at.

Everyone has their strengths and weaknesses, no one is good at everything. Working for a small consulting company allows you to leverage other skillsets so that you can focus on what you want to do, and what you do best. For example, one consultant we have hired travels across North America doing classes for management on things like team building, strategy, etc. and working for the consulting company allows him to focus on this rather than areas he is not as strong in.
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The reality is if you are asking people online for suggestions about becoming an entrepreneur you aren't meant for it. Typically entrepreneurs are highly motivated to get moving and won't sit around at a job they don't like. They also fight through many pain points to improve and become better. There are far more issues you deal with as a company owner than as a an employee, so if this issues frustrate you are your current job, be ready for three to four times more issues.

Maybe what works best for you is a new company and a new a position. You just seem tired of your company work culture more than being an employee.
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You do need some sort of service or product to be an entrepreneur. It's sounds like all your experience is with managing people or doing what others tell you needs to be done. A successful entrepreneur needs to be a self starter. As another poster here has mentioned the fact that you are posting this makes me think you don't have that in you.

Also when someone asked you what excites you, or what your passion is you didn't mention one thing that's tangible.

What exactly would you like to do? What kind of business do you see yourself running?
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Lacklustre wrote: You've told us what you're good at, but nothing about what you enjoy or excites you. You might be the most accomplished stacker of blocks in the world, but if you don't enjoy heights and climbing ladders, you'd make a poor mason.

Without passion for whatever you choose to do for yourself, it's not going to end well.
everyone talks about this... passion doesn't make you money.. that whole passion statement is bullshit.

you can be pationate about working man. HELKPING people out. That's it.. just acuse you love riding horses, doesn't mean you will be successfull at it.

leave your passions to your hobbies..

the only passion you need to have is providing value to others, and the money will roll in.
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Momof3cuties wrote: You do need some sort of service or product to be an entrepreneur. It's sounds like all your experience is with managing people or doing what others tell you needs to be done. A successful entrepreneur needs to be a self starter. As another poster here has mentioned the fact that you are posting this makes me think you don't have that in you.

Also when someone asked you what excites you, or what your passion is you didn't mention one thing that's tangible.

What exactly would you like to do? What kind of business do you see yourself running?
terrible advice all around..

sorry, but a spade gotta be called a spade. passion that is tangible?? Passion forMONEY and FREE TIME..

that should be your passion.

you don't become an entrepreneur to have a job.. you become an entrepreneur, get MONEY, get rich.
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I appreciate the feedback but also, really? Because I've never thought about it, I mustn't be able to do it? Because I've always followed a business plan well, it means I can't execute on my own? I develop strategy for international businesses so am not made to do this by myself?

Thanks anyway.
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canucky1 wrote: I appreciate the feedback but also, really? Because I've never thought about it, I mustn't be able to do it? Because I've always followed a business plan well, it means I can't execute on my own? I develop strategy for international businesses so am not made to do this by myself?

Thanks anyway.
I'll give you my example and you can understand what I personally feel about entrepreneurs. I've started working since I was 15. I've had over 7-10 jobs and I've hated each of them. Every job I would get bored quickly and hate my responsibilities. I left my $80,000 salary job 2 years ago, when I was 25 and started my business. I struggled from the beginning and it never got easier. I've made thousands of sales calls and I've been rejected approximately 98% of the time.

The difference is I enjoy what I do. I might work more, be stressed out more and still live my parents, but I can't go back to doing something I hate.

I didn't have to ask others if I should start a business. I had not option and that's what motivates me every day. If you are not motivated enough to start your own business I highly suggest against it.
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canucky1 wrote: I appreciate the feedback but also, really? Because I've never thought about it, I mustn't be able to do it? Because I've always followed a business plan well, it means I can't execute on my own? I develop strategy for international businesses so am not made to do this by myself?

Thanks anyway.
What product or service would you be selling?
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djpr wrote: I'll give you my example and you can understand what I personally feel about entrepreneurs. I've started working since I was 15. I've had over 7-10 jobs and I've hated each of them. Every job I would get bored quickly and hate my responsibilities. I left my $80,000 salary job 2 years ago, when I was 25 and started my business. I struggled from the beginning and it never got easier. I've made thousands of sales calls and I've been rejected approximately 98% of the time.

The difference is I enjoy what I do. I might work more, be stressed out more and still live my parents, but I can't go back to doing something I hate.

I didn't have to ask others if I should start a business. I had not option and that's what motivates me every day. If you are not motivated enough to start your own business I highly suggest against it.

Thank you for that perspective - very helpful :) I wish you the best.
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TrevorK wrote: Consulting companies are full of people like yourself that are tired of working for a corporate culture and instead want to work on their own. Working for a consulting company, even a smaller one, allows you access to work that you do not have to spend the time finding yourself. Instead, you stick to what you are good at.

Everyone has their strengths and weaknesses, no one is good at everything. Working for a small consulting company allows you to leverage other skillsets so that you can focus on what you want to do, and what you do best. For example, one consultant we have hired travels across North America doing classes for management on things like team building, strategy, etc. and working for the consulting company allows him to focus on this rather than areas he is not as strong in.
Good perspective - thanks Trevor. I'm not sure there are too many boutique ones in Western Canada but I'll take a look.
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djpr wrote: I'll give you my example and you can understand what I personally feel about entrepreneurs. I've started working since I was 15. I've had over 7-10 jobs and I've hated each of them. Every job I would get bored quickly and hate my responsibilities. I left my $80,000 salary job 2 years ago, when I was 25 and started my business. I struggled from the beginning and it never got easier. I've made thousands of sales calls and I've been rejected approximately 98% of the time.

The difference is I enjoy what I do. I might work more, be stressed out more and still live my parents, but I can't go back to doing something I hate.

I didn't have to ask others if I should start a business. I had not option and that's what motivates me every day. If you are not motivated enough to start your own business I highly suggest against it.
My thoughts exactly.

Furthermore, you will make mistakes and alot of your ideas will fail. You have to be able to mentally accept that, you have to be cool and level headed to be able to salvage the best situation from failures.

The biggest enjoyment in life is whopping the ass of your competitors while making good margins and doing stuff your way. The biggest peace of mind in life is knowing that if some catastrophe occurs and everything is stripped away from you, that you have the experience, knowledge, and toughness to rebuild your business brick by brick by yourself.

When you start your own business, any false beliefs of how good you are will be exposed, but if you have any correct beliefs/ideas/etc... it will be rewarded.

Also, 99% of sucessful business people did not strike gold on their first attempt, personally I think about 5-10 failures is the average depending if it is a service or product.
I workout to get big so I can pickup bricks and ****.
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what about black market entrepreneurship. sell em drugz
become a drugs inc. regular
profit
profit
profit
buy lambo

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