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Toronto bike lanes

  • Last Updated:
  • Oct 10th, 2020 3:20 pm
[OP]
Member
Sep 19, 2019
353 posts
19 upvotes

Toronto bike lanes

So last night I had to stop off at Noah's on Bloor st West (at Spadina).
As I park my car on Bloor st. I get out, walk around my car to get to the store, and I almost collided with a cyclist who was going very fast.
I missed him by perhaps 1 or 2 inches.

So I was wondering who would be liable if we had collided and one of us was seriously injured??
Do we have any lawyers on this site who can answer this??

My car was parked where the plumbing truck is in this pic.
I walked around the front of my car, so the cyclist was out of my view, and I was probably out of view to the cyclist as well

Image
37 replies
Member
Dec 28, 2009
239 posts
75 upvotes
Just to clarify....you were crossing the bike lane to get to the sidewalk?
[OP]
Member
Sep 19, 2019
353 posts
19 upvotes
Ninja15 wrote: Just to clarify....you were crossing the bike lane to get to the sidewalk?
Yepper. I did look before I crossed the bike lane at the last second (which I was why I missed him).
But if it was a split second later we would have collided for sure.
He was going very fast!
Deal Addict
Jan 10, 2009
1095 posts
538 upvotes
Toronto
You're the one trying to cross an active traffic lane, it's incumbent on you to make sure your way was clear.
Deal Fanatic
May 9, 2007
8725 posts
2407 upvotes
Vancouver Island, BC
Let’s see whether I have the question correct.

I’m assuming when you say the cyclist was going “very fast”, you mean surprisingly fast for a cyclist, not, “exceeding the posted speed limit”.

A pedestrian enters an active traffic lane, not at a marked crosswalk, and not at an intersection. If the pedestrian didn’t properly check for oncoming traffic and was hit by the vehicle, is the vehicle operator liable for the pedestrian’s action of placing themself in front of the moving vehicle?
"It is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends on his not understanding it." Upton Sinclair

“Our house is on fire.” Greta Thunberg
Deal Fanatic
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Mar 10, 2005
8922 posts
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It's on you OP, you walked in-front of a parked car - your own - and could not see around it and entered a live bike lane
Discomfort is your friend
[OP]
Member
Sep 19, 2019
353 posts
19 upvotes
blexann wrote: It's on you OP, you walked in-front of a parked car - your own - and could not see around it and entered a live bike lane
Fair enough. Luckily this time no damage done.

Is it perhaps time we started drafting some bylaws on how fast cyclists can go however??
Because IMO its an accident waiting to happen.
I can just picture some mother with her baby carriage crossing and crashing into a cyclist who's going way too fast.
Add to that there are now electric bikes being sold that can go around 30 km/h.
I think a 15 km/h speed limit for bikes is fair (although I have no idea how you would enforce that or whether you could outfit every bike with a speedometer)
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Nov 13, 2010
6759 posts
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Scarborough
These cyclists run red lights, run stop signs and speed in those lanes thinking its their highway. Only a matter if time before more of these collisions happen. And nobody gives a shit specially these cyclists. How dare anyone stop them or slow them down. They love yelling and getting angry if disturbed.
As usual cops dont care or do jack

And anyone who blames these cyclists is blamed and told they’re the one wrong.
I hate what they’ve done to danforth ave, reduced to 1 pathetic lane each way, catering to the bicycle gang. Turd tory done it
Deal Fanatic
Apr 25, 2006
6020 posts
1011 upvotes
The cyclist couldve killed you lol.

Don't mess with them.

So it is agreed it is your fault. Doesn't matter how fast the biker was going - you still tried to cross into an active lane. If it was a person walking through a road without looking, would it matter if the car was fast or slow? Same with bikes.
"If you make a mistake but then change your ways, it is like never having made a mistake at all" - Confucius
Deal Expert
User avatar
Nov 15, 2004
19133 posts
3315 upvotes
Toronto
DHWestview wrote: Fair enough. Luckily this time no damage done.

Is it perhaps time we started drafting some bylaws on how fast cyclists can go however??
Because IMO its an accident waiting to happen.
I can just picture some mother with her baby carriage crossing and crashing into a cyclist who's going way too fast.
Add to that there are now electric bikes being sold that can go around 30 km/h.
I think a 15 km/h speed limit for bikes is fair (although I have no idea how you would enforce that or whether you could outfit every bike with a speedometer)
What's 'way too fast' in an active traffic lane? Bicycles are vehicles and are required by law to be on the road for a reason. Manage your expectations better.

I'm not even that strong of a cyclist and I regularly hit 30 kph on my cheap Costco bike on level ground. Going downhill I can break 50 if I want to. Bikes are legally treated just like every other vehicle. Remember that when it comes to how you treat them. It's not 'an accident waiting to happen' if someone doesn't take a car seriously and carelessly crosses the road without looking, and it's the same for a bike.
Deal Fanatic
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Aug 16, 2010
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Aurora
You BOTH carry a burden of care. I don't like the way the bike lane and car parking spaces are laid out but it is what it is. You should have looked more carefully, yes. But the cyclist being a bigger vehicle capable of causing much more damage to a pedestrian rather than vice versa, should damn well be watching out for clueless pedestrians crossing the lane - again, especially the way it's laid out. Any cyclist going 40kph in the situation laid out in the picture is a complete idiot. Ride at a speed appropriate with the road conditions. Imagine if it was a 6 yr old kid crossing the bike lane - cyclist still going to argue the same moral high road?

This is coming from someone who did a 50k ride this morning and topped off at 60 kph on a decent.
Deal Addict
Jan 10, 2009
1095 posts
538 upvotes
Toronto
Bike can go the speed limit of the road, no other laws are needed. A bike lane is just a segmented section of a road, the same speed limit is in force, they're just separated from the rest of the vehicular traffic.

Anyway weren't you taught not to cross the road behind parked cars where you can't see or be seen?
[OP]
Member
Sep 19, 2019
353 posts
19 upvotes
MexiCanuck wrote: There is no need for bylaws. There are already provincial laws. The speed limit for bicycles is the same as the speed limit for motorcycles and cars
And exactly how many cyclists have ever gotten speeding tickets in Toronto?? Probably between zero and none.
So if there's no enforcement then why should cyclists care about going too fast??
Deal Expert
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Nov 15, 2004
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Toronto
DHWestview wrote: And exactly how many cyclists have ever gotten speeding tickets in Toronto?? Probably between zero and none.
So if there's no enforcement then why should cyclists care about going too fast??
Speed limits only apply to motor vehicles. Under current Canadian criminal law it is impossible for a foot-powered bicycle to break the speed limit as there is no speed limit for them since they're not motor vehicles. It's the same for horses. You can charge them with dangerous driving, failure to signal, etc, but speed limits literally do not apply to them the same way they do to cars. Municipalities may create bylaws to regulate this, but those are lesser offences.

Only motor vehicles are capable of breaking speed limits on level ground anyways. A bicycle would have to be going downhill to do so.
[OP]
Member
Sep 19, 2019
353 posts
19 upvotes
Piro21 wrote: Speed limits only apply to motor vehicles. Under current Canadian criminal law it is impossible for a foot-powered bicycle to break the speed limit as there is no speed limit for them since they're not motor vehicles. It's the same for horses. You can charge them with dangerous driving, failure to signal, etc, but speed limits literally do not apply to them the same way they do to cars. Municipalities may create bylaws to regulate this, but those are lesser offences.

Only motor vehicles are capable of breaking speed limits on level ground anyways. A bicycle would have to be going downhill to do so
Thats complete horseshit!

http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/safety ... fety.shtml
Rules of the road

As a cyclist, you must share the road with others (e.g., cars, buses, trucks, motorcycles, etc.).

Under Ontario's Highway Traffic Act (HTA), a bicycle is a vehicle, just like a car or truck.

Cyclists:
  • must obey all traffic laws
  • have the same rights and responsibilities as drivers
  • cannot carry passengers - if your bicycle is only meant for one person

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