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Toronto Hydro fees for 200 amps upgrade?

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  • Jun 27th, 2020 8:57 pm
[OP]
Member
Oct 3, 2012
208 posts
40 upvotes
GTA

Toronto Hydro fees for 200 amps upgrade?

My parents are looking into buying 2 electric vehicles and have been looking into upgrading their 100 amps panel to 200amps. They have the meter in their home and over head wires (Scarborough area)
I know the electrician does a lot of the work like the panel and mast connected to the house but what does Toronto Hydro do? And what are the costs for Toronto Hydro to upgrade the lines from the street pole from 100 to 200 amps? What other costs do Toronto Hydro charge?
We want to get some knowledge about the installation before we contact an electrician so we don't get ripped off.
22 replies
Deal Addict
Oct 14, 2004
1462 posts
427 upvotes
Toronto
F22Raptor wrote: Toronto Hydo's fee to upgrade to 200 amp is between $500 and $600. The unfortunate part is that this service used to be free (see the article below).


https://globalnews.ca/video/3376015/tor ... -new-fees/
That is just to shut off the power to your house.

OP, there is a form on the Toronto Hydro website that will contact the right people to give you a quote: https://www.torontohydro.com/for-home/s ... onnections

FYI, a Toronto Hydro engineer quoted us $6-8k in 2016 as there were already 14 houses on our street on one transformer. As a result, they wanted me to pay for my portion of a new transformer (hard to believe, but this was their explanation). They may have a more standardized pricing schedule now, but check that link and let us know. They may need a deposit to determine the cost/start the work.
Deal Fanatic
Aug 29, 2011
8192 posts
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Mississauga
$600 to pull the meter? Ouch.
Deal Addict
Oct 14, 2004
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Toronto
mrweather wrote: $600 to pull the meter? Ouch.
$600 was the disconnect/reconnect if they have to disconnect at the post. But again...it depends on your situation. The only way to know for sure is to get a quote via the link I sent.

FYI, here are the service fees:

Other service charges

Service Call — Customer-Owned Equipment
Applied in instances when Toronto Hydro crews are dispatched to inspect equipment and/or advise customers concerning electricity supply issues not directly related to Toronto Hydro's distribution system. Please note that additional charges may apply depending on the nature of the work being performed. Please consult with a Toronto Hydro representative beforehand regarding your specific requirements.
Charge: $55.00

Disconnect/Reconnect at meter — during regular hours
Applied upon a request to disconnect or reconnect a customer's electricity service at the meter during regular hours. This charge will also be applied to any disconnection or reconnection required to be undertaken by Toronto Hydro as a result of a customer's non-compliance with Toronto Hydro's Conditions of Service.
Charge: $120.00

Disconnect/Reconnect at meter — after regular hours
Applied upon request to disconnect or reconnect a customer's electricity service at the meter after regular hours. This charge will also be applied to any disconnection or reconnection required to be undertaken by Toronto Hydro as a result of a customer's non-compliance with Toronto Hydro's Conditions of Service.
Charge: $400.00

Disconnect/Reconnect at pole — during regular hours
Applied upon request to disconnect or reconnect a customer's electricity service at the pole or overhead transformer during regular hours. This charge will also be applied to any disconnection or reconnection required to be undertaken by Toronto Hydro as a result of a customer's non-compliance with Toronto Hydro's Conditions of Service.
Charge: $300.00

Disconnect/Reconnect at pole — after regular hours
Applied upon a request to disconnect or reconnect a customer's electricity service at the pole or overhead transformer after regular hours. This charge will also be applied to any disconnection or reconnection required to be undertaken by Toronto Hydro as a result of a customer's non-compliance with Toronto Hydro's Conditions of Service.
Charge: $820.00

Temporary Service Install and Remove — Overhead — No Transformer
Applied to any requests for a temporary service connection that can be accommodated from Toronto Hydro's overhead network without the need for a separate transformer installation. This charge is generally limited to 120/240V services not exceeding 200A, with a service drop of up to 30 metres in length. All other types of temporary connections are charged to customers based on Toronto Hydro's actual incurred costs.
Charge: $2,040.00

Specific Charge for Access to the Power Poles (Wireline attachments) — per pole, per year
This charge applies to Canadian carriers as defined by the Telecommunications Act and cable companies that operate in Ontario, which are permitted through regulations to attach equipment to Toronto Hydro's power poles.
Charge: $42.00
Deal Addict
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Jan 2, 2012
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KINGSTON,ON
F22Raptor wrote: Toronto Hydo's fee to upgrade to 200 amp is between $500 and $600. The unfortunate part is that this service used to be free (see the article below).


https://globalnews.ca/video/3376015/tor ... -new-fees/
They are covering their butts because when electric vehicles become the mainstay, almost every home will need a 200A service. The Ontario Electrical Code already specifies 200A services for any new residential builds.
Deal Addict
Oct 14, 2004
1462 posts
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Toronto
MrFrugal1 wrote: They are covering their butts because when electric vehicles become the mainstay, almost every home will need a 200A service. The Ontario Electrical Code already specifies 200A services for any new residential builds.
Watch the video! It only talks about the disconnect/reconnect!
Sr. Member
Aug 13, 2011
724 posts
301 upvotes
Scarborough southwes…
Julypop wrote: My parents are looking into buying 2 electric vehicles and have been looking into upgrading their 100 amps panel to 200amps. They have the meter in their home and over head wires (Scarborough area)
I know the electrician does a lot of the work like the panel and mast connected to the house but what does Toronto Hydro do? And what are the costs for Toronto Hydro to upgrade the lines from the street pole from 100 to 200 amps? What other costs do Toronto Hydro charge?
We want to get some knowledge about the installation before we contact an electrician so we don't get ripped off.
I have a Prius Prime and a Focus electric in a house with 100A.
I have a gas stove and so electric contractor said I should be fine without upgrade.
Your parents may not need to upgrade either if they are on gas.
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Oct 6, 2010
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Was quoted in 2010 for $2000 if 200 can be pulled from the line. This is only to run to your new panel which isn't free and than of course, the disconnect fees, the electrican costs. You'll probably be in the $3000 range.
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Nov 17, 2012
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Vast numbers of homes in Toronto will never be in position to charge an electric vehicle - street parking only, and usually not in front of your home.

As electric cars become more and more common, 3 things will happen:
  • Charging will become faster. Perhaps never as fast as pumping 40 liters of gas into an empty tank to be 'full' but 80% in 10 minutes is a reasonable expectation
  • Charging stations will become as ubiquitous as gas stations
  • Range will improve
The need for home-charging will be significantly reduced to the point of elimination.

I have a back lane and one car garage, so in theory I could spend thousands upgrading my power and running a large circuit to my garage (I have a 30A 240v line out there now) for a charger, or I could just manage things and charge at stations like I fill up my car today.

It's getting much better even now. I could in theory drive a Model 3 to my cottage (off grid, solar) and not worry about charging at home or there. Charging stations are close enough to make it pretty easy. So bopping around town, where electric cars actually work better (regenerative braking etc vs. long stretches of highway) should be easy without a home charger.
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Feb 19, 2019
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Stouffville ON
torontotim wrote: Vast numbers of homes in Toronto will never be in position to charge an electric vehicle - street parking only, and usually not in front of your home.

As electric cars become more and more common, 3 things will happen:
  • Charging will become faster. Perhaps never as fast as pumping 40 liters of gas into an empty tank to be 'full' but 80% in 10 minutes is a reasonable expectation
  • Charging stations will become as ubiquitous as gas stations
  • Range will improve
The need for home-charging will be significantly reduced to the point of elimination.
I disagree with the bolded section, it will be decades before we have sufficient infrastructure as common as gas stations, with a charge time of 10 minutes even a small line up can turn into 30 minutes or more wait. Toronto is only a small portion of GTA let alone province or a country, most houses do have easy access to set up home charging stations (that includes significant portion of houses in Toronto).

What is likely to happen, as the electric cars became more mainstream, the rates will became so high that the charging will be quite more expensive.
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Jan 21, 2018
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One other warning: check the age of your house and electrical service against current regulations. Lots of things have changed over the years, and existing homes and electrical installations are grandfathered. If upgrading service, you will also be required to pay for any updates to meet current code. My brother did this recently, and unexpectedly got hit with additional charges to install a new drop pole and underground conduit, as the installation his house had from the 1970s had the cables running down the city pole into his own underground conduit to the house. Direct connection to the city pole is no longer allowed, drop pole required. And the underground conduit he had was not wide enough for 200 amp service by current regulation.
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Nov 17, 2012
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senasena wrote: I disagree with the bolded section, it will be decades before we have sufficient infrastructure as common as gas stations, with a charge time of 10 minutes even a small line up can turn into 30 minutes or more wait. Toronto is only a small portion of GTA let alone province or a country, most houses do have easy access to set up home charging stations (that includes significant portion of houses in Toronto).

What is likely to happen, as the electric cars became more mainstream, the rates will became so high that the charging will be quite more expensive.
20 years to move from horse and buggy to the automobile. Economics will drive this very, very quickly. It's relatively easy to install charging stations at gas stations. I expect retrofit kits already exist to swap out pumps for charging stations. It will not be decades.

Not sure where you live in Toronto, but the majority of people don't live in areas where it is feasible to install personal chargers, and that is becoming more and more prevalent. Condos, apartments, townhomes, street-only parking neighborhoods... none of these are suited to personal charging and never will be.

Even if you 'own' a parking space in a condo, the electrical infrastructure wouldn't support deploying individual chargers. Maybe a few charging stations in the common parking area, but you'll never have the amperage at your spot.

Personal charging stations are a stop-gap temporary solution, and will remain the luxury item they are currently. For those with the space, infrastructure and money, sure, have a quick charge station. For the rest (majority) of people, it will be dependence on charging stations, which is good. This drives the model for them to be out in the wild for people to use.

Seeing the idiots line up at Costco for gas now, I don't think waiting 20 minutes to fill up your tank is going to be much of an issue. People need to slow down anyhow.
Deal Addict
Feb 19, 2019
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torontotim wrote: 20 years to move from horse and buggy to the automobile. Economics will drive this very, very quickly. It's relatively easy to install charging stations at gas stations. I expect retrofit kits already exist to swap out pumps for charging stations. It will not be decades.

Not sure where you live in Toronto, but the majority of people don't live in areas where it is feasible to install personal chargers, and that is becoming more and more prevalent. Condos, apartments, townhomes, street-only parking neighborhoods... none of these are suited to personal charging and never will be.

Even if you 'own' a parking space in a condo, the electrical infrastructure wouldn't support deploying individual chargers. Maybe a few charging stations in the common parking area, but you'll never have the amperage at your spot.

Personal charging stations are a stop-gap temporary solution, and will remain the luxury item they are currently. For those with the space, infrastructure and money, sure, have a quick charge station. For the rest (majority) of people, it will be dependence on charging stations, which is good. This drives the model for them to be out in the wild for people to use.

Seeing the idiots line up at Costco for gas now, I don't think waiting 20 minutes to fill up your tank is going to be much of an issue. People need to slow down anyhow.
I don't live in Toronto, most people don't live in Toronto.
Condos and apartments are perfect for charging stations, there are number of those already installed. 20 minutes is an issue to fill up, it may not be for Costco shoppers on the weekend but sure is for most people going to work, or coming home in the evening, I don't ever recall waiting this long for gas, second or third to get to the spot is usually the longest, most time I can just drive up and start filling right away.
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Mar 15, 2005
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We upgraded to 200amp service last week. We're in Pickering and our house was built in 1989. Our electrician arranged with Elexicon (formerly Veridian and Durham's equivilant to Toronto Hydro) to have the power shutoff while the feed and panel was upgraded. When i talked to the Elexicon guys they said all the homes out here already have the 200 amp feed, our electrician just needed to upgrade the lines from the meter to inside the house.
All the Elexicon guys did was turn the power off at 9am and came back to turn it on at 2pm.

I also heard the Elexicon guys saying to our electrician that if he was running later than 2pm than they would have to charge extra. Charging OT after only 20 mins work spread across only 5 hours? must be nice.
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Aug 29, 2011
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Our house was built in 1992 and it came with 200 amp service as a builder upgrade.
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discoblues wrote: We upgraded to 200amp service last week. We're in Pickering and our house was built in 1989. Our electrician arranged with Elexicon (formerly Veridian and Durham's equivilant to Toronto Hydro) to have the power shutoff while the feed and panel was upgraded. When i talked to the Elexicon guys they said all the homes out here already have the 200 amp feed, our electrician just needed to upgrade the lines from the meter to inside the house.
All the Elexicon guys did was turn the power off at 9am and came back to turn it on at 2pm.

I also heard the Elexicon guys saying to our electrician that if he was running later than 2pm than they would have to charge extra. Charging OT after only 20 mins work spread across only 5 hours? must be nice.
The electric company has windows to send out workers. If your electrician caused a delay and the window that was provided was extended, that would be OT. Granted, 20mins is close but another 10 and it's 1/2 the hour. Also, even though I do my own work, I can really appreciate electricians and the work they do. Shit is dangerous so they deserve the money they get.
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Newbie
Jan 9, 2020
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Hello Everyone,
I am planning to upgrade service from 100 amp to 200amp. It is in Scarborough and is Underground supply. I want to know if anyone here have recently upgraded the service from Toronto Hydro. My house is built in 1976 and Toronto Hydro saying due to old construction they need to work more and Hydro will quote for the job approx. 10k however my neighbor have 200amp.

I want to know so there anyone who have recently upgraded the service howmuch they paid to Toronto Hydro and howlong it took.
Any information will be appreciated.
Thank you
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Dec 14, 2004
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I live in Etobicoke and have a house built in 1990. Only 100 amp service and my contractor handed me a quote from Toronto Hydro for $6000 to upgrade the service to 200 amps to the panel. That’s on top of the $2200 the electrician is charging to upgrade the panel.

It’s not cheap and I’m not sure I’m going to go ahead with upgrading the service to 200 amps. I do really want to pull a 50amp circuit into the garage for a future L2 charger. I’m not sure if the next owner will actually appreciate the fact this house has upgraded service.

Decisions, expensive decisions...
Newbie
Mar 23, 2018
10 posts
dvdrat wrote: I live in Etobicoke and have a house built in 1990. Only 100 amp service and my contractor handed me a quote from Toronto Hydro for $6000 to upgrade the service to 200 amps to the panel. That’s on top of the $2200 the electrician is charging to upgrade the panel.

It’s not cheap and I’m not sure I’m going to go ahead with upgrading the service to 200 amps. I do really want to pull a 50amp circuit into the garage for a future L2 charger. I’m not sure if the next owner will actually appreciate the fact this house has upgraded service.

Decisions, expensive decisions...
Hi,

Would you mind pm’ing me your contractor info? I am looking to do an upgrade as well potentially.

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