Real Estate

Toronto was just ranked the top city Canadians want to move to

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  • Jan 23rd, 2020 10:19 am
[OP]
Sr. Member
Nov 10, 2017
726 posts
475 upvotes

Toronto was just ranked the top city Canadians want to move to

Despite sky-high real estate prices in Toronto and across the country, a new survey found that owning a home is still a priority for many.

The survey, completed by personal finance comparison website Finder, found that 54 per cent of Canadians would consider moving cities to buy a house. And the city most Canadians would move to is Toronto.

The study, which polled 1,200 Canadian adults, found that 46 per cent of Canadian adults are not willing to relocate to buy a property, so it's a fairly small majority.

Still, about 10 per cent of all respondents said they'd move to Toronto to buy a house.


The study also found that demographics had an impact on whether respondents were willing to move, and where.

Toronto was the number-one choice for respondents aged 18 to 44, but not for 45 year-olds and up.

It found that Gen Z are the most willing to move and the most likely to move to Toronto: 85 per cent said they'd be willing to relocate and over a quarter said they'd move to Toronto.

The second most popular city overall was Halifax, while the least popular was Regina.

Here are the top 10 cities Canadians would move to in order to buy a house.

Toronto
Halifax
St. Catharines
Ottawa
Kelowna
London
Kitchener
Montreal
Calgary
Vancouver

https://www.blogto.com/real-estate-toro ... t-to-move/
86 replies
Deal Fanatic
Feb 9, 2009
8740 posts
6103 upvotes
In shocker young people want to be where the action happens.

But but but bears said no one likes Toronto and we will have a 50% crash.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Nov 15, 2004
18316 posts
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Toronto
It's not like they really have a lot of choice though, is it? Here's how that list is ranked for most people:

Toronto - Average large-ish city
Halifax - Tiny town, low diversity, few jobs, not close to anything.
St. Catharines - A glorified suburb, not a real city. Few jobs.
Ottawa - Cold, small, poor transit, no real jobs aside from the government. You'll be restricted if you don't know French.
Kelowna - Even tinier town than St Catharines. Nothing to do and few jobs.
London - Crime and pollution. Low population, low diversity, few jobs.
Kitchener - Tiny university town. This is where you go to attend university or retire.
Montreal - The government will actively discriminate against you because you're not French. All the jobs are leaving. Low pay.
Calgary - Wrecked economy, few jobs.
Vancouver - Too expensive if you're not an international criminal, few jobs, low pay.

Toronto is really the only option in Canada for most people unless you're willing to put up with the disadvantages of living in the other cities. We don't have the options of choosing between multiple large city centres like Chicago, LA, San Francisco, Houston, Boston, Phoenix, DC, San Diego, Seattle, etc. Personally I'd rank Hamilton, Winnipeg, and Quebec City (if you're French) as better options than most on that list, but even those won't work for most people.
Last edited by Piro21 on Jul 16th, 2019 4:09 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Dec 27, 2009
6928 posts
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Ottawa, ON
Piro21 wrote: Ottawa - Cold, small, poor transit, no real jobs aside from the government. You'll be restricted if you don't know French.
Ottawa: beautiful, high wages (and no, I don't know French), affordable housing, big (1 million people is not "small" in my opinion), and the transit is better than where I came from (Victoria) by far - but could definitely improve. I don't work for the government, nor do I speak French, and I earn 1.5x what I made for the exact same work in BC. The winter may be cold, but the summer tends to be hot. I actually find I like the different seasons.
Deal Guru
Feb 29, 2008
10842 posts
6044 upvotes
My friends in the Vancouver thread swore I was crazy when I said TORONTO is #1 destination. Vancouver is 10th? Yikes.

Btw I take these lists with a grain of salt but anyone with sense knows TORONTO is tops.
Deal Addict
Dec 15, 2009
1318 posts
459 upvotes
Ontario
Piro21 wrote: It's not like they really have a lot of choice though, is it? Here's how that list is ranked for most people:

Toronto - Average large-ish city
Halifax - Tiny town, low diversity, few jobs, not close to anything.
St. Catharines - A glorified suburb, not a real city. Few jobs.
Ottawa - Cold, small, poor transit, no real jobs aside from the government. You'll be restricted if you don't know French.
Kelowna - Even tinier town than St Catharines. Nothing to do and few jobs.
London - Crime and pollution. Low population, low diversity, few jobs.
Kitchener - Tiny university town. This is where you go to attend university or retire.
Montreal - The government will actively discriminate against you because you're not French. All the jobs are leaving. Low pay.
Calgary - Wrecked economy, few jobs.
Vancouver - Too expensive if you're not an international criminal, few jobs, low pay.

Toronto is really the only option in Canada for most people unless you're willing to put up with the disadvantages of living in the other cities. We don't have the options of choosing between multiple large city centres like Chicago, LA, San Francisco, Houston, Boston, Phoenix, DC, San Diego, Seattle, etc. Personally I'd rank Hamilton, Winnipeg, and Quebec City (if you're French) as better options than most on that list, but even those won't work for most people.
Huh?

Hamilton sucks and is just like your evaluation of Kitchener and what jobs are there exactly (your knock on a few places) and Winnipeg is more in the middle of no where than is Halifax. Have you ever been to Manitoba? Colder than Ottawa. Also Quebec City is no better than Montreal for an anglophone. Worse probably as you can't find (m)any people who will converse in English, at least in Montreal most folks will.
Penalty Box
Aug 11, 2005
4175 posts
1410 upvotes
Fake news.

Nothing is stopping them. Why aren’t they here already?
Political avatars and signature are not permitted.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Apr 21, 2004
52783 posts
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Except for Kelowna and St. Catharines, most are medium to large cities where more diversified jobs / employment are.

No kidding people want to be where they can earn a living. Grinning Face
Penalty Box
Dec 30, 2012
1097 posts
1143 upvotes
Toronto
Piro21 wrote: It's not like they really have a lot of choice though, is it? Here's how that list is ranked for most people:

Toronto - Average large-ish city
Halifax - Tiny town, low diversity, few jobs, not close to anything.
St. Catharines - A glorified suburb, not a real city. Few jobs.
Ottawa - Cold, small, poor transit, no real jobs aside from the government. You'll be restricted if you don't know French.
Kelowna - Even tinier town than St Catharines. Nothing to do and few jobs.
London - Crime and pollution. Low population, low diversity, few jobs.
Kitchener - Tiny university town. This is where you go to attend university or retire.
Montreal - The government will actively discriminate against you because you're not French. All the jobs are leaving. Low pay.
Calgary - Wrecked economy, few jobs.
Vancouver - Too expensive if you're not an international criminal, few jobs, low pay.

Toronto is really the only option in Canada for most people unless you're willing to put up with the disadvantages of living in the other cities. We don't have the options of choosing between multiple large city centres like Chicago, LA, San Francisco, Houston, Boston, Phoenix, DC, San Diego, Seattle, etc. Personally I'd rank Hamilton, Winnipeg, and Quebec City (if you're French) as better options than most on that list, but even those won't work for most people.
I realize your intent was to be provocative but I’d like to address some of your claims anyway.

Halifax and London are far from “low diversity”. The former is 12% visible minority and the latter 20%, with all major religions represented. They may not be majority foreign and divided into ethnic ghettos like Toronto, but that doesn’t make them low diversity (quite the opposite actually).

K-W and Ottawa both have excellent and diversified economies and reasonable transit for their size.

If having to speak French to get a decent job in Montreal is discrimination, then surely having to speak English to get a decent job in Toronto is also discrimination. The “jobs are leaving” narrative about Montreal is 15-20 years out of date.

I actually do agree with you about Winnipeg. Underrated city. Interesting art and music scene. Shame about the winters but I’m told the dryness makes somewhat more bearable.
Penalty Box
Dec 30, 2012
1097 posts
1143 upvotes
Toronto
riffr aff wrote: Huh?

Hamilton sucks and is just like your evaluation of Kitchener and what jobs are there exactly (your knock on a few places) and Winnipeg is more in the middle of no where than is Halifax. Have you ever been to Manitoba? Colder than Ottawa. Also Quebec City is no better than Montreal for an anglophone. Worse probably as you can't find (m)any people who will converse in English, at least in Montreal most folks will.
Hamilton is quite nice actually in Westdale near McMaster or downtown.

Halifax is arguably more isolated than Winnipeg. From Winnipeg one can drive to Minneapolis in 7 hours or Chicago in 12. From Halifax the closest major city is Boston which is at least 12 hours away, and anything else is much further.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 13, 2016
3322 posts
2746 upvotes
All cities in Canada are boring except perhaps Montreal. Canada is made that way.
Deal Addict
Dec 15, 2009
1318 posts
459 upvotes
Ontario
civiclease wrote: Hamilton is quite nice actually in Westdale near McMaster or downtown.

Halifax is arguably more isolated than Winnipeg. From Winnipeg one can drive to Minneapolis in 7 hours or Chicago in 12. From Halifax the closest major city is Boston which is at least 12 hours away, and anything else is much further.
Fair enough. 7 hours, 12 hours ... Still not near much!
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Sep 8, 2007
8253 posts
8588 upvotes
Way Out of GTA
Toronto is #1 from a site called blogto?

This...is....shocking!

The fact that Toronto is the biggest city in Canada may also, you know maybe kinda has something to do with skewing towards Toronto if the sampling is weighed towards Ontario.
"It is in times of great fear or greed that the most opportunity exists."
Sr. Member
Jan 12, 2017
826 posts
360 upvotes
Seriously confused about the whole article. Move in order to buy a house? Shouldnt this be, where they would like to buy a house?

It's not like Toronto or the cities are the only places houses can be found.
JosephB012 wrote: Despite sky-high real estate prices in Toronto and across the country, a new survey found that owning a home is still a priority for many.

The survey, completed by personal finance comparison website Finder, found that 54 per cent of Canadians would consider moving cities to buy a house. And the city most Canadians would move to is Toronto.

The study, which polled 1,200 Canadian adults, found that 46 per cent of Canadian adults are not willing to relocate to buy a property, so it's a fairly small majority.

Still, about 10 per cent of all respondents said they'd move to Toronto to buy a house.


The study also found that demographics had an impact on whether respondents were willing to move, and where.

Toronto was the number-one choice for respondents aged 18 to 44, but not for 45 year-olds and up.

It found that Gen Z are the most willing to move and the most likely to move to Toronto: 85 per cent said they'd be willing to relocate and over a quarter said they'd move to Toronto.

The second most popular city overall was Halifax, while the least popular was Regina.

Here are the top 10 cities Canadians would move to in order to buy a house.

Toronto
Halifax
St. Catharines
Ottawa
Kelowna
London
Kitchener
Montreal
Calgary
Vancouver

https://www.blogto.com/real-estate-toro ... t-to-move/

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