Real Estate

This Toronto RE agent tricked this couple into selling their home!

  • Last Updated:
  • May 28th, 2019 4:00 pm
[OP]
Deal Expert
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Jan 27, 2004
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T.O. Lotto Captain

This Toronto RE agent tricked this couple into selling their home!

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/ ... -1.5147139

What do you think of this? IT sounds like just a out right blatant lie in their face to two very vulnerable people.
A blind man and his disabled wife were the victims.

The agent told them they were signing a mortgage renewal. Told them not to read the documents... but they were actually signing papers to sell their house!
22 replies
Deal Addict
Sep 14, 2010
1165 posts
301 upvotes
Toronto
well there will be always be scums realtors, makes those trying look bad. i hope they strip him out of his licence and ensure he never becomes a realtor again.
Deal Addict
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Dec 16, 2015
2513 posts
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Canada
Vince Iannel

Scam, fraud, jail this pos immediately!!
To the moon
Deal Addict
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Dec 16, 2015
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Nine days after being listed, the Verges' home was sold with the help of one of Iannello's colleagues at Royal LePage Your Community Realty.

Realtor Leslie-Jane Patterson's clients bought the Verges' home for $675 000.

This is why the realtors always have conflict of interest
To the moon
Deal Guru
Dec 11, 2008
10066 posts
1513 upvotes
Oh this is a tough story to read, I hope the guilty gets punished HARD.
Newbie
May 6, 2019
28 posts
9 upvotes
Clearly tricked the couple and undersold at value yet what really gets me is that the realtor is still insisting his commitment is "geniune".
SMH
Deal Addict
May 9, 2017
1077 posts
1116 upvotes
That's awful if true.

I bet the investor is another realtor or family/friend of one of those realtors.
Deal Addict
Aug 12, 2004
4473 posts
2123 upvotes
Calgary
Stories like this is why we do need media to expose scums like this. I'd be interested to know how this realtor initially started interaction with the couple.

This in an incredible example of elder and disability abuse.
Deal Fanatic
Feb 22, 2011
9664 posts
11865 upvotes
Toronto
Honestly I find this hard to believe. I think it's much more likely they have seller's remorse and are looking for an out.
Deal Addict
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Mar 23, 2011
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At some point these people had to deal with a lawyer. Did they just sit there mute and not speak to their lawyer and ask questions?
I do think that there is more to the story although both agents are hiding something too, the sellers don't seem that innocent either.
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Newbie
Sep 23, 2017
85 posts
39 upvotes
Somethi g does not add up. Sounds more like they are looking for a way out of this commitment. First of all they had to sign listing agreement. Show the home to potential buyers and then finalize the sale. Unless they very presented with Aps right away?
[OP]
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Jan 27, 2004
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mazerbeaner wrote: Honestly I find this hard to believe. I think it's much more likely they have seller's remorse and are looking for an out.
I know it seems dumb to the average person.
But crazy things like this do happen.
Things can be complicated and not always black and white.

Example. All those people who fall into romance scams and lose incredible amounts of money. Like the guy who lost $700k
[OP]
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sherman51 wrote: At some point these people had to deal with a lawyer. Did they just sit there mute and not speak to their lawyer and ask questions?
I do think that there is more to the story although both agents are hiding something too, the sellers don't seem that innocent either.
They were told that there is a law that people age 65 & over can’t own property & they have to sell it.
Sr. Member
May 3, 2013
643 posts
199 upvotes
Toronto
sherman51 wrote: At some point these people had to deal with a lawyer. Did they just sit there mute and not speak to their lawyer and ask questions?
I do think that there is more to the story although both agents are hiding something too, the sellers don't seem that innocent either.
I can see how the sellers may not have interacted with the lawyer until it was too late. The agent could've facilitated that interaction and the seller just needs to show up on closing day to sign the paper.

Something is fishy though. The sellers signed a lot of things, at different times. First, they signed the renewal papers (which CBC reviewed but didn't confirm). Then they would've needed to sign at least one more time, the Listing Agreement and the Agreement of Purchase. Sure, the agent allegedly told them they can't own a home at 65, wouldn't the sellers talk to friends, etc and someone would've told them otherwise? Those paper signing didn't happen overnight.

I don't know who's right and who's wrong, the article presented one side of the story. In situations like these where lawyers and lawsuits are involved, the defendants are advised not to talk to anybody about anything, so I don't see anything fishy about the agents not talking to the press. Furthermore, the agent who bought the house should be innocent regardless if it's a relative who bought it or not. If I saw a deal, I would let my friends and family know first. I also know some folks who don't like having their house listed on MLS nor having a for sale sign, they feel it's some sort of "embarrassment" that they have to sell their place, so the fact that it's not listed on MLS may be attributed to something like that? If that's the case, the easiest way to get the word out is internally and to previous buyers.

It could be agent scam (to which the agent has some ginormous balls) or seller's remorse, need to hear both sides of the story first.
Deal Expert
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Aug 2, 2010
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Here 'n There
Agent didn't list on MLS, sold well below market value. I'm with the ex-owners.
Deal Addict
Dec 30, 2012
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Toronto
Pretty normal realturd behaviour. Not sure why everyone is so surprised?
Deal Fanatic
Nov 22, 2015
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civiclease wrote: Pretty normal realturd behaviour. Not sure why everyone is so surprised?
Normal? Definitely not
Deal Addict
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Sep 19, 2013
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Winnipeg
There were several wrongdoings from the realtor.

But I'm surprised to know that the couple did not have anyone they talked to, like friends & family. The least they could have done is talked to their lawyer. Its sad, but the world is not so nice and if you dont take care of your interests, there will be someone who will take advantage of you.
In the beginning the Universe was created. This has made a lot of people very angry and been widely regarded as a bad move. -- Douglas Adams
[OP]
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Jan 27, 2004
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realtorhome wrote: I can see how the sellers may not have interacted with the lawyer until it was too late. The agent could've facilitated that interaction and the seller just needs to show up on closing day to sign the paper.

Something is fishy though. The sellers signed a lot of things, at different times. First, they signed the renewal papers (which CBC reviewed but didn't confirm). Then they would've needed to sign at least one more time, the Listing Agreement and the Agreement of Purchase. Sure, the agent allegedly told them they can't own a home at 65, wouldn't the sellers talk to friends, etc and someone would've told them otherwise? Those paper signing didn't happen overnight.

I don't know who's right and who's wrong, the article presented one side of the story. In situations like these where lawyers and lawsuits are involved, the defendants are advised not to talk to anybody about anything, so I don't see anything fishy about the agents not talking to the press. Furthermore, the agent who bought the house should be innocent regardless if it's a relative who bought it or not. If I saw a deal, I would let my friends and family know first. I also know some folks who don't like having their house listed on MLS nor having a for sale sign, they feel it's some sort of "embarrassment" that they have to sell their place, so the fact that it's not listed on MLS may be attributed to something like that? If that's the case, the easiest way to get the word out is internally and to previous buyers.

It could be agent scam (to which the agent has some ginormous balls) or seller's remorse, need to hear both sides of the story first.
I can understand the skepticism.
Dumber things have happened.
Every once in a while there will be one of those “wtf how the heck did that happen?”
Type of scenario.

For example...
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jho_Low

He defrauded $11 billion friggin dollars USD from Malaysia... by pretending to be a super rich educated socialite.

Or those romance scams where people seemingly and willingly send their entire friggin life savings. Imagine you as a regular hard working person lost $700,000... it happens.
Deal Fanatic
May 1, 2012
9675 posts
9135 upvotes
Markham
This is either Fraud or seller's remorse... could be both I suppose. I would be pissed too if my realtor sold my house for 200k undervalue.

I hope someone gets the hammer.

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