Automotive

Toyota to spend $13.5 billion to develop EV battery tech and supply by 2030

  • Last Updated:
  • Sep 8th, 2021 2:02 pm
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May 16, 2011
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MARKHAM
This article quotes directly from Toyota itself, I think it isn't rumour, speculation or opinion of the journalist...

That being said, I wish Toyota best of luck with their endeavour. Right now, I think that they'll have to do what Tesla did and develop the entire chain of technology from fuel cells to cars to the fuelling infrastructure and fuel production in house. As of yet I'm not convinced that we can economically produce green hydrogen (via electrolysis). Nor will the market do so without someone (Toyota) biting the bullet and losing money, in order to incentive buying their vehicles.
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Jan 8, 2009
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Scrambling to develop BEV technologies in time for government mandated ICE bans is not taking the lead.
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Sep 30, 2011
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MISSISSAUGA
they are too late, big T waste big time on the hydrogen crap, supply by 2030, that's when ICE car start to get banned, LOL.
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Bevatron wrote: Scrambling to develop BEV technologies in time for government mandated ICE bans is not taking the lead.
They’ve had a decade or more developing hybrids, which integrate a lot of BEV tech in. They’re one of the few companies to have consistently reduced their CO2 emissions and beat EU limits (stricter than US/Canada). From an overall lifetime emissions perspective their vehicles are very similar to larger batteries BEVs...

While they don’t have BEVs specifically, they have the suppliers, the technology and the knowledge to create one. They’ve done more than any other company (including Tesla) in providing electrified vehicles for the masses (as opposed to the rich).

I certainly wouldn’t bet against them. They’ve a traditionally conservative company, which may be why they’re taking the time to develop a pure BEV. That and their customer base (value conscious and wanting reliability).

Their hydrogen foray may be problematic, but hydrogen economies are being pushed hard by many developed world governments (including Japan), so it may make sense in many ways, especially if excess hydrogen is available (being produced from “waste” renewable energy).
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Sep 1, 2004
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napoleonbot wrote: they are too late, big T waste big time on the hydrogen crap, supply by 2030, that's when ICE car start to get banned, LOL.
1) again ban may not materialize by 2030.

2) China is now pushing hydrogen as the future. EV are great for mobility but not in the commercial field. Unless there is significant breakthrough with battery tech that will reduce weight 10x, hydrogen is the ONLY fuel with potential to replace diesel and gas for commercial fleets.
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Sep 1, 2004
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Ken_vs_Ryu wrote: I thought they were all in on hydrogen
But investor wants EVs. Akio has folded under investor pressure.

Investors are right. The market for EV is there even if it doesn't quite work for Toyota and Toyota has to be a bit less Japanese to get there.

Same reason Toyota is almost the last to embrace AA/CP in their head units.
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Jul 4, 2004
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Don't quite get the downvotes; OP is just reporting a news article. Don't shoot the messenger. You might not like the message but it's from a reputable source
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Jun 4, 2020
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michelb wrote: Don't quite get the downvotes; OP is just reporting a news article. Don't shoot the messenger. You might not like the message but it's from a reputable source
It's because I'm perceived at anti ev when in reality I just couldn't care about the Tesla everyone in here gets their rocks off on. Quite interested in the joint toyota/subaru ev suv thsts coming. Interested in the id4. Interested in the ariya.

A 90k tesla suv does nothing for me - I'd rather pay my mortgage.

Hence the down votes.
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Mar 22, 2004
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Bye bye Toyota by 2030 it would be too late....
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KevinM56081 wrote: It's because I'm perceived at anti ev when in reality I just couldn't care about the Tesla everyone in here gets their rocks off on. Quite interested in the joint toyota/subaru ev suv thsts coming. Interested in the id4. Interested in the ariya.

A 90k tesla suv does nothing for me - I'd rather pay my mortgage.

Hence the down votes.
$90k compact SUVs will be the norm when a $50K SUV is consider cheap and a budget buy. Remember $20K was a cheap car and $40K is an entry luxury car? EV changed all that. The world can't cope with the change but the climate can't cope with us not changing. So the only solution is inflation which will price out our current living standards, voluntary or involuntary.

Like I said, everyone back on e-bikes. We have designed our cities wrong if the goal is to reduce emissions. Driving EVs is just putting a tiny bandaid on a 10" knife wound.
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Xtrema wrote: $90k compact SUVs will be the norm when a $50K SUV is consider cheap and a budget buy. Remember $20K was a cheap car and $40K is an entry luxury car? EV changed all that. The world can't cope with the change but the climate can't cope with us not changing. So the only solution is inflation which will price out our current living standards, voluntary or involuntary.

Like I said, everyone back on e-bikes. We have designed our cities wrong if the goal is to reduce emissions. Driving EVs is just putting a tiny bandaid on a 10" knife wound.
Can't argue on the design front.

Not looking forward to my 60km one way evoke commute in Feb though!Face With Tears Of Joy

Climate aside, housing affordability is a large problem that contributes to our reliance on the horse less carriage, but isn't one for this thread.
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Bevatron wrote: Scrambling to develop BEV technologies in time for government mandated ICE bans is not taking the lead.
What happened to fuel cells? I thought they were committed to that tech?
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Xtrema wrote: 1) again ban may not materialize by 2030.

2) China is now pushing hydrogen as the future. EV are great for mobility but not in the commercial field. Unless there is significant breakthrough with battery tech that will reduce weight 10x, hydrogen is the ONLY fuel with potential to replace diesel and gas for commercial fleets.
How so? They have more BEV than rest of the world combined.
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https://global.toyota/en/newsroom/corpo ... 71839.html



The three core technologies that support this full lineup of electrified vehicles are electric motors, batteries, and power control units.

Today, in this context, regarding batteries, I would like to share with you Toyota's unique approach and the competitive edge that we have developed via the mass production of electrified vehicles.

While promoting a full lineup of electrified vehicles, we have also been developing and manufacturing a full lineup of batteries.

For HEVs, our focus is on power output, or in other words, instantaneous power, while, when it comes to PHEVs and BEVs, our focus is on capacity or what can be called "endurance".

As batteries for HEVs, we have been continuously evolving nickel-metal hydride batteries and lithium-ion batteries by taking advantage of their respective characteristics.

Our bipolar nickel-metal hydride battery, which was announced this year and is focused on providing instantaneous power, will be used in an increasing number of vehicles.

For lithium-ion batteries for PHEVs and BEVs, we have been striving to improve both cost and endurance, and we will continue to improve them as we move forward.

We are developing a further advanced new type of lithium-ion battery for introduction in the second half of the 2020s.

From here, I would like to explain something that Toyota values in its development of batteries.

What Toyota values the most is to develop batteries that its customers can use with peace of mind.

Especially, we are focusing on safety, long service life, and high-level quality to produce good, low-cost, and high-performance batteries.

For example, longer service life also affects a vehicle's residual value.

In terms of cruising range, high energy density and high-level performance are also necessary.

We want to make the charging speed faster, but too fast will affect safety.

Therefore, we think it is important to strike a balance between each of these factors to ensure safe use.

This concept has remained unchanged since batteries were installed in the first-generation Prius, and it is the same for the batteries in all of our electrified vehicles.

By applying the technology that we have cultivated through our experience in batteries for HEVs also to the batteries for future BEVs, we believe that we will be able to deliver batteries that can be used with peace of mind.

Now, I would like to introduce three examples of the many efforts required to produce batteries that can be used safely, using lithium-ion batteries as the focus of my explanation.

This is an example of ensuring safety.

It is known that each battery cell shows signs of localized abnormal heat generation during spirited driving or other driving that places a large load on the battery.

By analyzing the phenomena occurring inside the battery and conducting a vast amount of model experiments, we have been able to clarify the effect of driving style on the battery, as well as the mechanism of this effect.

Based on the results, we have been able to detect signs of abnormal local heating of cells through multiple monitoring of voltage, current, and temperature of individual cells, blocks of cells, and the entire battery pack.

The battery is then controlled to prevent abnormal heat generation.

We will maintain our concept of ensuring safety, security, and reliability down to the local areas of each battery even when it comes to BEV systems, and we will continue to refine that concept.

The second example I would like to share with you is our commitment to long service life.

We have applied the technologies that we have cultivated through the development of batteries for HEVs to PHEVs, and the batteries in the C-HR BEV have a greatly higher capacity retention rate after 10 years than the batteries hitherto used in our PHEVs.
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I'm not interested in a wall of text from CEO but rather actual products on the streets.
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divx wrote: How so? They have more BEV than rest of the world combined.
Well, what you see today is bearing fruits after almost a decade of push. Some even say it's been 3+ decades of pushes. Remember Buffett dropping serious coin in BYD back in 2008?
Two Chinese companies, Ganfeng and Tianqi Lithium, make up the largest share of the lithium market at 26%. China produces 64% of the world’s graphite, and captures 80% of the world’s cobalt refining industry. At the second stage, battery manufacturing, the results are the same. Two leading Chinese giants, Contemporary Amperex Technology (CATL) and Build Your Dreams (BYD), control 32% of the market.
Along with almost 60% rare earth market share, China is now the leader and became Saudi Arabia of the next century. If you need a battery, you need to pay the CCP. If you need an electric motor, pay the CCP. They are not resting on their laurels and moving onto the next thing to keep the dominance.

https://asia.nikkei.com/Spotlight/Caixi ... gs-to-know

There is no way the world can fly or deliver goods on batteries in the next 20-30 years. Hydrogen is the only logical choice to get rid of fossil fuel.


Now can China do it is a whole another story. They are staring at steering towards a soft landing of a 2008 style housing crisis of their own. May or may not be able afford to push incentives to push the tech.
Last edited by Xtrema on Sep 8th, 2021 1:53 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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KevinM56081 wrote: A 90k tesla suv does nothing for me - I'd rather pay my mortgage.
Hence the down votes.
But don't you want that exciting feeling of 0-60mph at every traffic light? Or able to accelerate very hard in the city's congested traffic?
Or want to be loved by your friends, neighbours, spouse, kids, families?

Come on....

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