Expired Hot Deals

[Toys R Us] Philips advent baby bottles glass starter kit - $47.87

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  • Feb 21st, 2018 2:20 pm
[OP]
Deal Addict
Jun 1, 2008
3020 posts
3303 upvotes

[Toys R Us] Philips advent baby bottles glass starter kit - $47.87

For those that might prefer glass baby bottles and expecting a child soon, toysrus has a good starter kit on sale right now.

Sale price $47.87

http://www.toysrus.ca/product/index.jsp ... d=38038276
Last edited by TomRFD on Feb 8th, 2018 11:52 am, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: title edit
17 replies
Sr. Member
Apr 29, 2014
982 posts
337 upvotes
Pickering, ON
Dr. Browns is the way to go. We used it for 2 kids and never had any issues or fuss. We started with Phillips and my son refused to use it.
Jr. Member
Nov 14, 2009
168 posts
70 upvotes
the tommee tippee isn't GLASS bottles.
i tried ALL the brands with my first and she liked Phillips.
Member
Dec 3, 2008
278 posts
90 upvotes
Surrey
We bought several Evenflo glass bottle 6 packs from Amazon USA over the years....glass is way better than plastic. Glass bottles go into the dishwasher and hand washed the plastic connector parts. We didn't want hot water leeching out of the chemicals from the plastic connectors so hand washed the connector parts...plus the dishwasher shortens the lifespan of plastics by heating them up causing them to break down cracking and breaking.

https://www.amazon.com/Evenflo-Feeding- ... B00N9X4TYI
Sr. Member
Aug 11, 2017
562 posts
351 upvotes
All those who commented above, which one is a hotter deal? Don't want to pay full price on dr browns if the Phillips is at a huge discount now. Makes sense?
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Mar 17, 2006
6884 posts
5801 upvotes
Burlington
Landon99 wrote: All those who commented above, which one is a hotter deal? Don't want to pay full price on dr browns if the Phillips is at a huge discount now. Makes sense?
You never know, we went through many bottles including Dr browns until Phillips Avent. But like the other person said, their kids only took Dr Browns. So your kid might like one and not the other, or neither.

We bought 3x 8oz and 3x 4oz for around $40 total. We go through these brushes once every few months. The brushes are then passed down to adult bottles + coffee mugs then other things. Lol
https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B019OY ... UTF8&psc=1
and this dispenser set
https://www.amazon.ca/Munchkin-80103-Po ... +dispenser

So I say the Philips set is a good price. But again, you don't know what your kids would take.
Member
Mar 7, 2009
478 posts
139 upvotes
Ottawa
not sure which one to get, glass one or the plastic one. Any suggestions? Thanks in advance.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jan 8, 2008
2518 posts
933 upvotes
Halifax
We used these for our first and they worked wonderfully, I'd recommend them. Hopefully our second will like them just as much, and if I needed more I'd be all over this. We wanted glass and I like how you can change the nipples as they get older (probably can do that with other brands too?)
Deal Addict
Aug 19, 2011
4218 posts
3143 upvotes
Markham
pat_wobbly wrote: We bought several Evenflo glass bottle 6 packs from Amazon USA over the years....glass is way better than plastic. Glass bottles go into the dishwasher and hand washed the plastic connector parts. We didn't want hot water leeching out of the chemicals from the plastic connectors so hand washed the connector parts...plus the dishwasher shortens the lifespan of plastics by heating them up causing them to break down cracking and breaking.

https://www.amazon.com/Evenflo-Feeding- ... B00N9X4TYI
Polypropylene, which all baby bottles are made, is a thermoplastic. It can literally be melted and re-injectection formed for many cycles without degradation, so dishwasher heat is absolutely no problem. In fact, most cutlery baskets inside dishwashers are made of PP. So I hope your dishwasher has absolutely no plastic parts, cause otherwise those glass bottles are getting washed with leached chemicals. Smiling Face With Open Mouth
Deal Addict
Dec 25, 2012
1113 posts
439 upvotes
Toronto
pat_wobbly wrote: We bought several Evenflo glass bottle 6 packs from Amazon USA over the years....glass is way better than plastic. Glass bottles go into the dishwasher and hand washed the plastic connector parts. We didn't want hot water leeching out of the chemicals from the plastic connectors so hand washed the connector parts...plus the dishwasher shortens the lifespan of plastics by heating them up causing them to break down cracking and breaking.

https://www.amazon.com/Evenflo-Feeding- ... B00N9X4TYI
I'm sure the nipple that you use is glass too?
JS
Deal Guru
Sep 2, 2008
11838 posts
1682 upvotes
For anyone going to the states....baby stuff is so much cheaper. Recently saw Avent on clearance dirt cheap at Target.

Anyway back to this deal...make sure you sign up for r club membership for additional 10% off!!
Member
Dec 3, 2008
278 posts
90 upvotes
Surrey
X24Secret wrote: Polypropylene, which all baby bottles are made, is a thermoplastic. It can literally be melted and re-injectection formed for many cycles without degradation, so dishwasher heat is absolutely no problem. In fact, most cutlery baskets inside dishwashers are made of PP. So I hope your dishwasher has absolutely no plastic parts, cause otherwise those glass bottles are getting washed with leached chemicals. Smiling Face With Open Mouth
Plastic baby connector parts all hand washed. The concern is the plastic bottles themselves with milk or food sitting in them as chemicals leach into them. Ever notice how pyrex plastic lids ..a 'thermoplastic' breaks down over time from the high heat in the dishwasher?

And in case you didn't know..

"Results: Almost all commercially available plastic products we sampled—independent of the type of resin, product, or retail source—leached chemicals having reliably detectable EA, including those advertised as BPA free. In some cases, BPA-free products released chemicals having more EA than did BPA-containing products."

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3222987/
Member
Dec 3, 2008
278 posts
90 upvotes
Surrey
James Stonehenge wrote: I'm sure the nipple that you use is glass too?
Can you not read? Let me re-quote in case you might have missed it:

"We didn't want hot water leeching out of the chemicals from the plastic connectors so HAND WASHED the connector parts."
Deal Addict
Aug 19, 2011
4218 posts
3143 upvotes
Markham
pat_wobbly wrote: Plastic baby connector parts all hand washed. The concern is the plastic bottles themselves with milk or food sitting in them as chemicals leach into them. Ever notice how pyrex plastic lids ..a 'thermoplastic' breaks down over time from the high heat in the dishwasher?

And in case you didn't know..

"Results: Almost all commercially available plastic products we sampled—independent of the type of resin, product, or retail source—leached chemicals having reliably detectable EA, including those advertised as BPA free. In some cases, BPA-free products released chemicals having more EA than did BPA-containing products."

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3222987/
Right. If you actually read the study you quote, they are talking in absoloute terms and their sampling is by using solvents on the plastics. This is an absoloute controlled environment test and fails to mention relation of time in contact between food/beverage and container vs. rate of chemicals leached because of their sampling methodology which doesn't consider this.

While we're quoting studies, here is one on PET bottles which are considered less 'safe' compared to PP:
“The conclusions of the study indicate that both the packaging, whether it be plastic or glass, and the bottled water are completely safe for health and comply with prevailing legislation”, stresses the lead author, Silvia Lacorte, to SINC.
As I mentioned, if you're washing your glass bottles in the dishwasher, they are covered in whatever chemicals that leach out of the machine's many plastic parts in to the wash/rinse water anyway.

And if plastics leach as per your linked study, handwashing or not, they are gonna leach a certain amount when they come in to contact with food/liquid. And I hope you're not using a plastic bristle brush or plastic sponge to clean those small handwashed parts, cause plastic leach. :)
Member
Dec 3, 2008
278 posts
90 upvotes
Surrey
X24Secret wrote: Right. If you actually read the study you quote, they are talking in absoloute terms and their sampling is by using solvents on the plastics. This is an absoloute controlled environment test and fails to mention relation of time in contact between food/beverage and container vs. rate of chemicals leached because of their sampling methodology which doesn't consider this.

While we're quoting studies, here is one on PET bottles which are considered less 'safe' compared to PP:



As I mentioned, if you're washing your glass bottles in the dishwasher, they are covered in whatever chemicals that leach out of the machine's many plastic parts in to the wash/rinse water anyway.

And if plastics leach as per your linked study, handwashing or not, they are gonna leach a certain amount when they come in to contact with food/liquid. And I hope you're not using a plastic bristle brush or plastic sponge to clean those small handwashed parts, cause plastic leach. :)
So you don't use Soap in your dishwasher? lmao

You selectively read it I guess..here let me quote the study further:

"This leaching of monomers and additives from a plastic item into its contents is often accelerated if the product is exposed to common-use stresses such as ultraviolet (UV) radiation in sunlight, microwave radiation, and/or moist heat via boiling or dishwashing."

They even specifically quote plastic baby bottles:

"The exact chemical composition of almost any commercially available plastic part is proprietary and not known. A single part may consist of 5–30 chemicals, and a plastic item containing many parts (e.g., a baby bottle) may consist of ≥ 100 chemicals, almost all of which can leach from the product, especially when stressed. Unless the selection of chemicals is carefully controlled, some of those chemicals will almost certainly have EA, and even when using all materials that initially test EA free, the stresses of manufacturing can change chemical structures or create chemical reactions to convert an EA-free chemical into one with EA."

Dishwashing bottled parts in luke warm water is gonna be waaayy less stress on the plastic parts than the high intense hot dishwashing water. The stainless steel dishwasher with a plastic rack isn't touching the glass bottles (except for the lip) and gets a several rinses in the end. Being glass bottles the food or milk does not sit in plastic and have chemicals leach into it which is my most concern (as I have mentioned before). I have no plastic forks..stainless steel utensils only and proper ceramic dishes (costco). I could never imagine eating with plastic utensils or plates..people at work do that...stainless all the way.

Its like if you want to chain smoke go right ahead. I'll always avoid second hand smoke. I can't always get away from it if I'm walking down the street and someone walking by is smoking. Same with plastics. I can't always get away from it but the less I can expose myself and my family to the better obviously.
Deal Addict
Dec 14, 2008
2254 posts
1607 upvotes
Landon99 wrote: All those who commented above, which one is a hotter deal? Don't want to pay full price on dr browns if the Phillips is at a huge discount now. Makes sense?
Looks like the deal is over. But to answer your question, I recommend buying a small quantity of the bottles which goes on huge discounts. We went through several types of bottles (low flows, small size, large size, nipple shape, etc..) until we found one that worked out.

Also... exclusive formula feeding vs formula supplement feeding may require different bottles as well. Expect to go through a few until you find one that works -- be prepared to get them at regular price putting your inner RFD-er to shame. Because your baby will need to eat... NOW :). There isn't a "best bottle" or "single bottle solution", just opinions from different parents on what worked.

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