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Trouble to install A pull up bar

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Trouble to install A pull up bar

I want to install this pull up bar https://www.treadmillfactory.ca/xm-wall ... hin-up-bar

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I tried to mount 3 of the 9 holes per side to the stud, but one stud was screwed in with 3' lag screws and didn't insert well into the wood stud (I believe it wasn't centered).

Unfortunately, I need to place this pull up at this same heigh of the stud, and bad holes have already been drilled.

So I have decided to find an alternative, but unfortunately, new problems happened.

My initial goal was to buy a 2 x 8 and cut to 24'' length and use the bolt/washers/nuts to lock the pull up bars and have (each side) the 2 x 8 attached to one stud with (5) gsk structural 5/16 x 5'' screws.

But then, I realize the back side where the hex of the bolts has 1/4'' elevated, and in order to be flush to the wall, I have to countersink it, but I lost 0.5'' (including the thickness of a lock washer).

And after all is done, I realize the 2 x 8 is actually a 1.5 x 8 (I am not sure why the hardware store lied about the 2'' while it's 1.5''). Because of the countersink, I already lost 0.5''. So this makes it a 1 x 8...

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Now are my questions:

1. Is 5/16 x '' structural screws will have enough strength considering both screws are drilled linear into one stud only?
2. I am unable to put a flat washer on the hex side because I have no drill bit that can countersink a large area. So I decided you use a smaller diameter lock washer on the hex side of the bolt.
So 9 bolts as followed ( Hex side --> lock washer --> wood --> lock washer --> flat washer --> nut). Will that be ok?
3. Is the 3/8'' bolt, 2'' length be strong enough?
4. Will the [1.5'x8 therefore countersink to become 1x8 wood stud] be strong enough for the pull up?
5. What is the torque of the nuts?
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Paris
Lag the wood to a stud. Lag the chin-up bar to the wood. You are overthinking.

Also, all 2x lumber is 1.5 (some is 1-3/8”
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Jerico wrote: Lag the wood to a stud. Lag the chin-up bar to the wood. You are overthinking.

Also, all 2x lumber is 1.5 (some is 1-3/8”
thanks, so you are saying the 2x lumberisn't really 2 inches?

I initially thinking of lag the pull up to the lumber, but the original lag screws are 3 inches screw while the lumber is only 1.5 inches. So my thought was it might not be deep/long enough for the sheer strength (especially it is 36' from the wall).
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L4cky wrote: thanks, so you are saying the 2x lumberisn't really 2 inches?

I initially thinking of lag the pull up to the lumber, but the original lag screws are 3 inches screw while the lumber is only 1.5 inches. So my thought was it might not be deep/long enough for the sheer strength (especially it is 36' from the wall).
I hate to give you more bad news, but your 2x8 isn't actually 8" wide either. It's closer to 7.25"

I'd get rid of the lag bolts and use something like the FastenMaster HeadLok screw. It's stronger than a 3/8 lag bolt but has a flat head so there's no countersinking needed. You can get them at HD, Lowe's, Home Hardware...

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That wall mounted chin-up bar is not designed to mount to wall studs. If it was, the mounting holes would not be spaced as they are. To mount that to a wood wall, you'd need to remove the drywall, build structure and then mount. That's why the photos show it mounted to a cinder block wall.

Return it if you can, spend the extra $150 and get one of these. You'll have way fewer headaches. And you'll have a bunch of other exercises at your disposal as well.

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https://www.treadmillfactory.ca/fit-505 ... ise-vkr-v2
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Jerico wrote: Lag the wood to a stud. Lag the chin-up bar to the wood. You are overthinking.

Also, all 2x lumber is 1.5 (some is 1-3/8”
I'm having problems following your descriptions, and it would take too much effort to translate, so I'll stay out of specifics.
I'm in general agreement with Jerico.
I will add that you should drill pilot holes for those screws into the studs. [look it up, if that is foreign to you]
L4cky wrote:
thanks, so you are saying the 2x lumberisn't really 2 inches?
schade wrote: I hate to give you more bad news, but your 2x8 isn't actually 8" wide either. It's closer to 7.25"[/img]
Since this is providing an education on 2x lumber, I'll also take the opportunity for further education which may benefit the OP in the future.
You have "counterbored", not "countersunk", those holes.
https://www.rockler.com/learn/differenc ... oles-usage
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Are you installing this on a finished wall?
Let's hug it out
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RCGA wrote: Are you installing this on a finished wall?
yeah, in my living room.
Last edited by L4cky on Apr 17th, 2020 12:16 pm, edited 2 times in total.
"Every marathon you run, your heart scars and you will die faster. If you think running a marathon is fitness, then you know NOTHING ABOUT HEALTH & FITNESS."
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schade wrote: I hate to give you more bad news, but your 2x8 isn't actually 8" wide either. It's closer to 7.25"

I'd get rid of the lag bolts and use something like the FastenMaster HeadLok screw. It's stronger than a 3/8 lag bolt but has a flat head so there's no countersinking needed. You can get them at HD, Lowe's, Home Hardware...

Image
Can you link me the best FastenMaster HeadLok screw (length, width) for my projects? If I understand, those screws can attach the metal frame of the chin up bar to the wood lumber, right? (no need washers)
torontotim wrote: That wall mounted chin-up bar is not designed to mount to wall studs. If it was, the mounting holes would not be spaced as they are. To mount that to a wood wall, you'd need to remove the drywall, build structure and then mount. That's why the photos show it mounted to a cinder block wall.

Return it if you can, spend the extra $150 and get one of these. You'll have way fewer headaches. And you'll have a bunch of other exercises at your disposal as well.

Image

https://www.treadmillfactory.ca/fit-505 ... ise-vkr-v2
unfortunately, I bought it 8 years ago :( I read the description that the hole patterns are for multiple mounting options, such as not all wood studs are spaced exactly 16 inches apart, so not all hole shave to be used (according to description). But I am not sure if 3 lag bolts of 5/16 each side would be enough (especially it is 36 inches from the wall) - shear strength. But there is no user manual and treadmill factory said they can't find one, and the manufacturer doesn't have a working website..
"Every marathon you run, your heart scars and you will die faster. If you think running a marathon is fitness, then you know NOTHING ABOUT HEALTH & FITNESS."
- Training 101
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arisk wrote: I'm having problems following your descriptions, and it would take too much effort to translate, so I'll stay out of specifics.
I'm in general agreement with Jerico.
I will add that you should drill pilot holes for those screws into the studs. [look it up, if that is foreign to you]

I thought about that but my lumber is only 1.5'' thick instead of 3 inches (lag screws). I believe 1.5 inches lag screws is not deep enough for shear strength (maybe I could be wrong). But putting 9 x1.5'' of them each side, is it more solid than 3 x 3'' per side?



Since this is providing an education on 2x lumber, I'll also take the opportunity for further education which may benefit the OP in the future.
You have "counterbored", not "countersunk", those holes.
https://www.rockler.com/learn/differenc ... oles-usage
"Every marathon you run, your heart scars and you will die faster. If you think running a marathon is fitness, then you know NOTHING ABOUT HEALTH & FITNESS."
- Training 101
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Three bolts on each side into structure will be more than strong enough. So if you can get 3 bolts on each side into a stud, you should be fine.

I have a hanging rattan chair suspended from a single 3/8" or so eye-bolt screwed into a ceiling joist. With me in the chair it's a solid 200 pounds hanging straight down from the eye-bolt into the ceiling joist.
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torontotim wrote: Three bolts on each side into structure will be more than strong enough. So if you can get 3 bolts on each side into a stud, you should be fine.

I have a hanging rattan chair suspended from a single 3/8" or so eye-bolt screwed into a ceiling joist. With me in the chair it's a solid 200 pounds hanging straight down from the eye-bolt into the ceiling joist.
are carriage bolts as good/strong as lag bolts?
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L4cky wrote: are carriage bolts as good/strong as lag bolts?
Carriage bolts arent even the same thing. They have a round head you cant put a tool on and require nugs.

Lag bolts are glorified screws with. Hex head and some just call them screws
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Jerico wrote: Carriage bolts arent even the same thing. They have a round head you cant put a tool on and require nugs.

Lag bolts are glorified screws with. Hex head and some just call them screws
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I mean are they both as strong (for this project)?
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The first thing you have there is a bolt. Lag bolts have a pointy end on them.

They are both as strong but I would use a washer on the bolt.

Lag bolt:
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Any bolt you use will be plenty strong in terms of shear strength.

For this application you ideally use lag bolts directly into a wood wall stud (we're assuming the studs are wood, not steel).

If you can't line up the mounting holes on the bar with wall studs, then you would use three 2 x 4 pieces of lumber mounted horizontally on the wall.

So instead of the two upright pieces you started with, you would want three - one for each set of mounting holes spanning the width of the bar.

Mount the bar to the three 2 x 4's using any sort of bolt. The nut and washer can be on the 'outside' visible to you so you only have to recess the head of the bolt. A Carriage bolt with the rounded head would make this easy. The head of the carriage bolt will pull into the 2 x 4 without having to drill a large hole for it to counter sink into, but you can drill a shallow hole if you want.

Then you mount the entire thing to the wall bolting through the 2 x 4's into wall studs, wherever they happen to be. Naturally as centrally located to the pull up bar center as possible but it shouldn't matter.

You should be able to hit as many as four wall studs. Use 5 foot long 2 x 4's as the bar is 4 foot wide. This gives you 6 inches on either end and some wiggle room to locate it on the wall.

You can use lag bolts or those large structural screws posted earlier. One through each 2 x 4 into a wall stud.
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torontotim wrote: Any bolt you use will be plenty strong in terms of shear strength.

For this application you ideally use lag bolts directly into a wood wall stud (we're assuming the studs are wood, not steel).

If you can't line up the mounting holes on the bar with wall studs, then you would use three 2 x 4 pieces of lumber mounted horizontally on the wall.

So instead of the two upright pieces you started with, you would want three - one for each set of mounting holes spanning the width of the bar.

Mount the bar to the three 2 x 4's using any sort of bolt. The nut and washer can be on the 'outside' visible to you so you only have to recess the head of the bolt. A Carriage bolt with the rounded head would make this easy. The head of the carriage bolt will pull into the 2 x 4 without having to drill a large hole for it to counter sink into, but you can drill a shallow hole if you want.

Then you mount the entire thing to the wall bolting through the 2 x 4's into wall studs, wherever they happen to be. Naturally as centrally located to the pull up bar center as possible but it shouldn't matter.

You should be able to hit as many as four wall studs. Use 5 foot long 2 x 4's as the bar is 4 foot wide. This gives you 6 inches on either end and some wiggle room to locate it on the wall.

You can use lag bolts or those large structural screws posted earlier. One through each 2 x 4 into a wall stud.
Very detailed, thanks, exactly what I needed.

Mind if I ask what happens if two 2x8 is mounted vertically each side rather than 3 horizontal 2x4? I asked because it will save me from repaiting and rebuying the lumbers. I believe your horizontal idea is much much solid, as it grips like 4 studs rather than 2. But aren't 2 studs enough? (I just try to avoid drilling many holes to the wall)

I have already predrilled counterbored to 1/4'' deep (that means lumber thickness is 1.25''). The lumber of 1 to 1.25'' thick won't break/bent, right (like mdf)?
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The vertical pieces you have put on don't give you any extra strength. If the uprights line up with 2 wall studs, then just bolt directly to them.

The entire thing is only as strong as the connection into the wall studs. The extra bolts connecting the bar to those painted pieces don't help it stay on the wall.
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L4cky wrote: Mind if I ask what happens if two 2x8 is mounted vertically each side rather than 3 horizontal 2x4? I asked because it will save me from repaiting and rebuying the lumbers. I believe your horizontal idea is much much solid, as it grips like 4 studs rather than 2. But aren't 2 studs enough? (I just try to avoid drilling many holes to the wall)
You should not go vertical. You will be putting a live load on this (you, I assume) and if you mount vertically you will slowly rip the top out and damage your drywall. Also, chances are 99-100% the studs are only tied in top and bottom inside the wall so you could actually start to pull the 2x4 stud out of the wall. Horizontal means you are gripping 3-4 studs across and spreading the load significantly, plus the downward lever pressure isnt as much.

3 2x6s will do the job, and those are about $15 total. Do it once right.
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Jerico wrote: You should not go vertical. You will be putting a live load on this (you, I assume) and if you mount vertically you will slowly rip the top out and damage your drywall. Also, chances are 99-100% the studs are only tied in top and bottom inside the wall so you could actually start to pull the 2x4 stud out of the wall. Horizontal means you are gripping 3-4 studs across and spreading the load significantly, plus the downward lever pressure isnt as much.

3 2x6s will do the job, and those are about $15 total. Do it once right.
Ohh I thought studs are supposed to be able to hold a more weight than my body.
One 2″ x 4″ x 8′ #2 Spruce Pine Stud is good for about 3000 lbs of compressive load, when held in place by drywall. That being said, your mileage will vary significantly; actual strength of a 2x4 stud is usually controlled more by how well the board is framed into the wall at the top and bottom.
But you are right, we know know how the wall studs might be installed.

I will go and get the lumbers. May I ask why 2x6 rather than 2x8? My chin up bar is 24 inches vertical and I was thinking 3x8 could avoid spiders going in between. Btw should I glue those 3 pieces together (nevermind, they are 7 inches wide instead of 8)?
"Every marathon you run, your heart scars and you will die faster. If you think running a marathon is fitness, then you know NOTHING ABOUT HEALTH & FITNESS."
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