Computers & Electronics

TV with ethernet connection -some basic questions

  • Last Updated:
  • Jan 6th, 2011 10:31 am
[OP]
Deal Addict
Apr 9, 2008
2905 posts
233 upvotes
Toronto

TV with ethernet connection -some basic questions

How does internet in a TV with ethernet work?

Do such TVs also have browsers built-in for users to check emails and browse internet?
or internet in such TVs only allow streaming from services such as netflix etc and not the normal internet browsing I do on computer?

If ethernet TV does allow regular internet browsing, is it possible to do the same on TVs with USB and HDMI input?
6 replies
Deal Fanatic
Feb 21, 2006
5148 posts
100 upvotes
Usually the TV runs a version of Linux or some other portable OS internally, but it's limited to running only approved apps that you can download from the manufacturer (see for example: http://www.samsung.com/us/article/apps- ... or-your-tv). Be aware that the internet media streaming apps that are offered in Canada are more limited than those in the U.S. because of country-specific licencing (e.g., in the U.S. you may get Netflix, Hulu, Amazon video-on-demand, VuDu, Pandora etc., but in Canada you might only get Netflix.ca). I don't know of any TVs that offer a general-purpose web browser app or have full keyboard support, but you can do something similar with some game consoles or hacked media players.

TVs with USB ports or memory card slots usually support only photo viewing and firmware updates from those sources. The same TV model sold in Europe or Asia may also support video playback and even video recording with USB or memory cards, but those features are usually crippled in North America due to licencing restrictions and fear of litigation in the USA.

HDMI is for video+audio input only.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Apr 9, 2008
2905 posts
233 upvotes
Toronto
Aske001 wrote: Usually the TV runs a version of Linux or some other portable OS internally, but it's limited to running only approved apps that you can download from the manufacturer (see for example: http://www.samsung.com/us/article/apps- ... or-your-tv). Be aware that the internet media streaming apps that are offered in Canada are more limited than those in the U.S. because of country-specific licencing (e.g., in the U.S. you may get Netflix, Hulu, Amazaon video-on-demand, VuDu, Pandora etc., but in Canada you might only get Netflix.ca). I don't know of any TVs that offer a general-purpose web browser app or have full keyboard support, but you can do something similar with some game consoles or hacked media players.

TVs with USB ports or memory card slots usually support only photo viewing and firmware updates from those sources. The same TV model sold in Europe or Asia may also support video playback and even video recording with USB or memory cards, but those features are usually crippled in North America due to licencing restrictions and fear of litigation in the USA.

HDMI is for video+audio input only.

I just clicked thanks for the great answer.

So I went to a TV store and found out that Sony has lots more websites available on their TV (incl. youtube) but Sharp only had netflix. How to find out which manufacturer has apps for which website? is it only a matter of firmware upgrade? which manufacturers release for free?
Deal Fanatic
Feb 21, 2006
5148 posts
100 upvotes
The only way to tell which apps each manufacturer has available is to visit their web sites where they have information on the TV apps.

- Apps available are different in each country, so look for for each manufacturer's Canadian web site. You can safely assume that most U.S. apps for streaming video and music are not available in Canada.

- Apps available are updated from time to time, and new apps can be downloaded along with firmware updates. Netflix.ca for example is relatively recent, so some manufacturers still haven't gotten around to releasing an app for it, but might soon if they don't have one currently.

- Not every app that a manufacturer offers is available on every model. Sometimes an app will be released for newer models only (e.g., the latest Samsung TVs in the U.S. now have a Hulu app available, but for some reason it isn't available for the earlier TVs and Blu-Ray players that offer Samsung's [email protected] apps). Don't know if the reasons are technical, planned product obsolescence, or licencing costs.

- Most TV apps are free, but not all of them. Some manufacturers have set up an app store with a scheme for pay TV apps (like the iTunes app store). Samsung has one, but it's only available in the U.S., and the only pay apps are a few games and commercial photo galleries, so nothing to get excited about.

Just about everybody supports YouTube, as it's the one default video streaming app available in most countries.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Apr 9, 2008
2905 posts
233 upvotes
Toronto
I read in one of the threads there is a way to watch internet TV without PS3 for non-internet TV ready TVs (46c610) by connecting it in bridge mode. I searched for it but did'nt find much information about it. Any idea how is it possible to watch internet TV for a non-internet TV with an ehternet port by connecting it with laptop or computer in bridge mode?
Is it possible to do the same on a TV with HDMI only and no ethernet (sony's 46ex500)
Deal Fanatic
Feb 21, 2006
5148 posts
100 upvotes
You can use bridge mode in your computer's Network Connections settings to bridge two network connections, for example to connect a local wireless device via your wireless connection to a VPN so that you can access U.S. streaming sources. In that case you need a client device like a TV or media player that already supports media streaming, and a computer in the middle dedicated to providing the VPN and the bridged connection. It's do-able, but a bit of an awkward arrangement unless you plan to dedicate an old computer to do the job full time.

If your TV doesn't natively support media streaming via an ethernet connection, then you'll have to add another device like a media player (e.g., WDTV Live, Patriot Box Office, Asus OPlay etc.), or a game console (PS3, XBox, Wii) or a recent-model Blu-Ray player that supports media streaming (e.g., various Samsung, Sony, LG models), or a dedicated HTPC (Home Theatre PC).
[OP]
Deal Addict
Apr 9, 2008
2905 posts
233 upvotes
Toronto
Aske001 wrote: You can use bridge mode in your computer's Network Connections settings to bridge two network connections, for example to connect a local wireless device via your wireless connection to a VPN so that you can access U.S. streaming sources. In that case you need a client device like a TV or media player that already supports media streaming, and a computer in the middle dedicated to providing the VPN and the bridged connection. It's do-able, but a bit of an awkward arrangement unless you plan to dedicate an old computer to do the job full time.

If your TV doesn't natively support media streaming via an ethernet connection, then you'll have to add another device like a media player (e.g., WDTV Live, Patriot Box Office, Asus OPlay etc.), or a game console (PS3, XBox, Wii) or a recent-model Blu-Ray player that supports media streaming (e.g., various Samsung, Sony, LG models), or a dedicated HTPC (Home Theatre PC).

I see. So I'd have to leave my PC running if I watch youtube or netflix on my TV unless I buy an internet enabling device and connect it directly with the TV.

My current setting is Ipad, laptop and PC connecting wirelessly with router and I was planning to connect my TV via ethernet with the router.

Top