Computers & Electronics

ultimate home network setup

  • Last Updated:
  • May 24th, 2021 10:18 am
9 replies
Deal Expert
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Feb 24, 2003
17647 posts
4127 upvotes
Toronto
Nicely organized but I wouldn't consider this to be the ultimate home network.
Deal Expert
Mar 25, 2005
21987 posts
2806 upvotes
120v AC power through a brush plate, seems safe.
Deal Addict
Jul 21, 2005
1836 posts
912 upvotes
Alberta
Other than being nicely organized, nothing good about it. There is no reason to have two wifi routers side by side...EVER
Deal Addict
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Mar 3, 2011
3941 posts
22223 upvotes
This is what you call an ultimate setup

Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2006
27969 posts
13600 upvotes
Gee wrote: I think that is anything but ultimate.

Consumer gear, bolted to a wall…

Get some decent gear and a rack
And a friggin server for the love of $deity.
2 notebooks ziptied to a wall? I have questions. (Apparently for an NVR and one for RDP/Management, but that raises further questions)

Also the tiniest battery backup I've ever seen. Even without the notebooks that'll last all of 5 seconds.
And while a neat spaghetti factory, it's still a spaghetti factory. Due to consumer gear, SO MANY WALL WARTS.

While I commend him having a UPS, having only one tiny consumer UPS means he doesn't have managed shutdown.
I have a butt ton of battery banks so I can do a managed shutdown. Anything non essential gets killed first. Then more important stuff. Then the core stuff.

His hard drives also look like they're single points of failure. Probably fine for an NVR but the one attached to one router I'm assuming is acting as a NAS.

Finally he didn't wall mount his printer.
Do you not have anything else to do rather than argue with strangers on the internet
Nope. That's why I'm on the internet arguing with strangers. If I had anything better to do I'd probably be doing it.
Sr. Member
Dec 6, 2020
545 posts
541 upvotes
To paraphrase Red Green, that network is the product of someone working several thousand dollars above their level of comprehension.

Anyone who was willing to go to that much trouble and expense should have spent a little more effort to learn how to design a network properly.

There are a lot of fails here that would be easy to fix without much increase in cost or increased space footprint.
.
  • Don't use consumer-grade WiFi APs. TP-Link APs are around the same price as Netgear AP/routers but are far more capable.
  • Definitely don't put two APs in the same closet if you've gone to the trouble of running hardwired Ethernet elsewhere in the property. Put one AP in the closet and one on another floor.
  • Don't use two daisy-chained Ethernet switches. Get a managed, vlan-capable, switch with enough ports.
  • Don't use a laptop and two external drives as a makeshift NAS. But a proper NAS or build one using internal drives and a PC case.
  • If you have the space, use a proper patch panel rather than some spawn-of-Satan 3x4 keystone plate.
  • If you have the budget, even a refurbished desktop computer will make a much better server than an old laptop.
  • Virtualization is thing. You don't need two servers unless you need redundancy.
  • If you're going to go to this much trouble with your home network, don't use a consumer network gateway/router. OpnSense, ClearOS, VyOS, and OpenWRT are all much better choices if you have a server that can run them.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2006
27969 posts
13600 upvotes
middleofnowhere wrote: If you have the budget, even a refurbished desktop computer will make a much better server than an old laptop.
While I did shit on the notebook myself, to be honest, a notebook makes a better entry server than an old computer.
There's a built in keyboard/monitor and a "UPS" (aka a battery). Kitted out, you could have redundant storage.
You're obviously a little slow on the CPU department and probably a little light on the RAM department but for an entry level server serving up a couple of services at home?
I've run pfSense off a notebook before. This actually made sense since I could separate out my router from my VM stack and my router also had a backup "UPS" that was separate from my main UPS so I bought myself a bit more runtime.

I'm obviously running a full blow server (I recently bought a Supermicro Fat Twin with a couple of E5-2683 v4 and 128GB of RAM for each node) and a frankly ridiculous UPS, I'm not a typical use case.
Do you not have anything else to do rather than argue with strangers on the internet
Nope. That's why I'm on the internet arguing with strangers. If I had anything better to do I'd probably be doing it.

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