Computers & Electronics

Unable to access any service except Rogers at my new postal code. Is this allowed?

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[OP]
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Aug 5, 2008
220 posts
1 upvote
Toronto

Unable to access any service except Rogers at my new postal code. Is this allowed?

I live in a condo in downtown Toronto right now and have service with TekSavvy. I'm moving to Mississauga into a new build townhouse complex (technically a condo as well) and when I called TekSavvy they said it was a "fiber only" area or some crap, currently under CRTC review. TekSavvy said they would put in a request/query to Rogers to see what was up, but on the website my new postal code revealed some services I "may" qualify for. Start & Distributel as well as Bell all say that service is unavailable at that location. Rogers is greenlit.

Is this allowed? I thought it was against regulation to not allow third-party providers at the least; I understand if Bell isn't available.

Any advice? has anyone else gone through something like this? Thanks in advance. :(
11 replies
Deal Addict
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Jul 26, 2013
2732 posts
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Mississauga, Ontario
A fellow Mississaugian lol.

I had a similar issue with my new build just this month, except it was the reverse. Only Bell is available. Rogers wasn't ready for at least a month. But Bell was ready in each house. The builder also used Bell and they were VERY pushy for me to sign up with Bell. They had Bell's wiring ready, but Rogers wasn't. Rogers was kinda "implying" that the builder was pushing them away for a while from getting their cabling setup.

I think the Telco's make some kind of deals or have some kickback arrangement with builders, in order to keep the competitor out for a while. I have a thread in the video game sections, outlining more detail about what I went through. Soorry too lazy to type more lol.

As for Fibre to the house, it's true. Fibre is not "shared" with other telcos like Teksavvy, etc. They are not allowed to use it. It's basically another monopoly all over again. Teksavvy and others are complaining to CRTC, Bell and Rogers saying they invested money in Fibre, they should not be forced to share it with a competitor. Cable and DSL they are required to share, but not fibre.
[OP]
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Aug 5, 2008
220 posts
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Toronto
So basically I'm stuck with Rogers fibre optic service until the foreseeable future?

Any idea how to get in contact with a good Rogers rep so I don't get swindled into a contract? I'm with Rogers for phone service but only because I'm a corporate plan. This sucks.
Deal Guru
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Jan 11, 2004
10020 posts
879 upvotes
Toronto
cleanup wrote: So basically I'm stuck with Rogers fibre optic service until the foreseeable future?

Any idea how to get in contact with a good Rogers rep so I don't get swindled into a contract? I'm with Rogers for phone service but only because I'm a corporate plan. This sucks.
maybe in 10 years. other then that ,, either move or get ready and bend over.
"When operating the viewfinder diopter control with your eye to the viewfinder, care should be taken not to put your finger in your eye accidentally."
Deal Addict
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Aug 29, 2011
4836 posts
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Westmount (Montreal)
I live in the wood and can only have Xplornet.

Omg this is so unfair.

Drama!

I think you should get a blog
[OP]
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Aug 5, 2008
220 posts
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Toronto
vonblock wrote: I live in the wood and can only have Xplornet.

Omg this is so unfair.

Drama!

I think you should get a blog
I live in an urban area, surrounded by buildings & homes serviced by any choice of internet service provider. If I lived across the street I wouldn't be posting this.

Not trying to be rude but that's the concern here; the lack of service which is against regulations in an area that is normally fully serviceable. I obviously would be more understanding if I lived in Rimouski.
[OP]
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Aug 5, 2008
220 posts
1 upvote
Toronto
SuperDuperFox wrote: A fellow Mississaugian lol.

I had a similar issue with my new build just this month, except it was the reverse. Only Bell is available. Rogers wasn't ready for at least a month. But Bell was ready in each house. The builder also used Bell and they were VERY pushy for me to sign up with Bell. They had Bell's wiring ready, but Rogers wasn't. Rogers was kinda "implying" that the builder was pushing them away for a while from getting their cabling setup.

I think the Telco's make some kind of deals or have some kickback arrangement with builders, in order to keep the competitor out for a while. I have a thread in the video game sections, outlining more detail about what I went through. Soorry too lazy to type more lol.

As for Fibre to the house, it's true. Fibre is not "shared" with other telcos like Teksavvy, etc. They are not allowed to use it. It's basically another monopoly all over again. Teksavvy and others are complaining to CRTC, Bell and Rogers saying they invested money in Fibre, they should not be forced to share it with a competitor. Cable and DSL they are required to share, but not fibre.
So I was told by the Builder that there are definitely people there with Bell service, including hismelf. He also said he believes his service is DSL.

So although there may not be cable service available, DSL should be a given since it's run through phone lines, no? If I want to stay with TekSavvy, could I not setup DSL regardless of where it is? I'm fine with 25/10, don't really want to shell out nearly twice the price for fibre service.
Deal Addict
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Jun 10, 2011
2056 posts
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Woodbridge
I've lived in my house in Thornhill since new in 2002 and the area still to this day doesn't have any Bell services. Until 2005 there was a phone company (Futureway or futuretel cant remember) and they were bought out by Rogers. So pretty much they have a monopoly.
I wouldn't hold my breath and expect any competitors joining anytime soon. Hopefully Techsavvy will offer resale cable internet through Rogers.
Banned
Jan 23, 2016
1430 posts
407 upvotes
Kitchener, ON
SuperDuperFox wrote: A fellow Mississaugian lol.

I had a similar issue with my new build just this month, except it was the reverse. Only Bell is available. Rogers wasn't ready for at least a month. But Bell was ready in each house. The builder also used Bell and they were VERY pushy for me to sign up with Bell. They had Bell's wiring ready, but Rogers wasn't. Rogers was kinda "implying" that the builder was pushing them away for a while from getting their cabling setup.

I think the Telco's make some kind of deals or have some kickback arrangement with builders, in order to keep the competitor out for a while. I have a thread in the video game sections, outlining more detail about what I went through. Soorry too lazy to type more lol.

As for Fibre to the house, it's true. Fibre is not "shared" with other telcos like Teksavvy, etc. They are not allowed to use it. It's basically another monopoly all over again. Teksavvy and others are complaining to CRTC, Bell and Rogers saying they invested money in Fibre, they should not be forced to share it with a competitor. Cable and DSL they are required to share, but not fibre.
The reason tek savvy cam use the old copper lopps is because they were government subsidized during comstruction. Why should they have access to fiber networks they didnt pay to construct?
Deal Addict
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Aug 29, 2011
4836 posts
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Westmount (Montreal)
cleanup wrote: I live in an urban area, surrounded by buildings & homes serviced by any choice of internet service provider. If I lived across the street I wouldn't be posting this.

Not trying to be rude but that's the concern here; the lack of service which is against regulations in an area that is normally fully serviceable. I obviously would be more understanding if I lived in Rimouski.
Sure but

You have optical fiber to your house.

I would kill a young seal with my bare hand to have that.

You should be happy
Deal Fanatic
Aug 29, 2011
6584 posts
3574 upvotes
Mississauga
Since when did Rogers have fibre optic service?

Pretty much anymore new developments will be entirely FTTH (and potentially coax). No buried copper. Until CRTC straightens things out you'll be stuck with Bell.
Deal Guru
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Mar 1, 2004
12862 posts
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Pickering
cleanup wrote: I live in an urban area, surrounded by buildings & homes serviced by any choice of internet service provider. If I lived across the street I wouldn't be posting this.

Not trying to be rude but that's the concern here; the lack of service which is against regulations in an area that is normally fully serviceable. I obviously would be more understanding if I lived in Rimouski.
What regulations are we talking about?
durrsak wrote: I've lived in my house in Thornhill since new in 2002 and the area still to this day doesn't have any Bell services. Until 2005 there was a phone company (Futureway or futuretel cant remember) and they were bought out by Rogers. So pretty much they have a monopoly.
I wouldn't hold my breath and expect any competitors joining anytime soon. Hopefully Techsavvy will offer resale cable internet through Rogers.
Futureway Communications, then FCI Broadband. Rogers bought 20% of Futureway in 2001 for 26 million and then acquired the rest in 2007.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report-o ... e18426449/
http://www.itworldcanada.com/article/ro ... clec/28545


http://www.newswire.ca/news-releases/ro ... 08481.html
Sparky9087 wrote: The reason tek savvy cam use the old copper lopps is because they were government subsidized during comstruction. Why should they have access to fiber networks they didnt pay to construct?
Aaaand here s the comment that paints the picture.
mrweather wrote: Since when did Rogers have fibre optic service?

Pretty much anymore new developments will be entirely FTTH (and potentially coax). No buried copper. Until CRTC straightens things out you'll be stuck with Bell.
Somewhere in 2011-2012 "Rogers Ultimate Fibre" 350/350. Available in condos downtown only.




The big problem is also the end to end systems are not compatible. Currently with DSL and cable modems, you can mix different brands of equipment. As the system gets more complicated, then the system is more proprietary. When Rogers funneled their services over Futureway's fibre to the curb, the systems did not mesh well and service was inconsistent. The reason why Futureway was born in the first place is because the home builders wanted a clean looking neighbourhood and wanted all teh wires buried. When Bell declined to bury their wires, the builder found a FTTH system and told Bell the fibres would be buried and there would be a point of interface for the Bell wiring to jump into the system.

Bell declined to use the system and told the builder if they don't like it, they can open their own phone/internet company. Futureway was born. Bear in mind that on a construction site, the builder does NOT have to allow access to any communications providers. That means if a communications provider wants access and they were not allowed on the construction site by the builders, they have to wait for the property to be turned over to the city. This can be up to four years AFTER you move in. In the areas with no Bell, they have declined to come in after construction is complete because it is too expensive, they are not blocked.

Company Description: Founded In 1997, Futureway Communications was one of the first Competitive Local Exchange Carriers (CLEC) certified by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) to deliver communications in Canada. Futureway became Canada's first, fibre-to-the-home, facilities based communications provider, and was instrumental in bringing in competition to local residential markets.

Futureway became know for their use of new "flush-to-grade" technology which virtually eliminated green and brown boxes from streets and boulevards in new residential developments. In October of 2000, Futureway executed one of the largest private placements in Canada with a $60 million private capital placement. Following that, Futureway acquired DSL (Digital Subscriber Line) co-location facilities in the GTA from the now defunct CI Communications. This acquisition provided Futureway Communications with the ability to expand its network and acquire business customers outside its original 905 footprint. This also opened the door to providing GTA business customers with access to a larger range of telecommunication choices. With the acquisition of these co-location facilities, Futureway became the first company in North American to launch Extended DSL High-Speed service to business customers outside the incumbent provider's reach. Extended reach service unlocks the bandwidth limitation of ordinary copper wires at a very economical price.

In July 2001, Futureway Communications received a senior debt financing of $40 million that enabled the company to continue to rollout its business plan and expand its services across the GTA to residential and commercial customers. In June 2003, Futureway Communications re-branded and adopted the operating name FCI Broadband. The transition also included a redesign of the company logo. This strategic move has kept FCI Broadband at the forefront of the growing demand for high speed data and digital services.

September 2005 marked the launch of iTalk Digital Phone Service - FCI Broadband's VoIP (Voice over Internet) service. Their new state-of-the-art feature server and soft-switch, combined with the reliability of their existing public switched network access, makes iTalk a compelling option for any customer seeking to try VoIP. Early in 2006, FCI Broadband announced they could "Eliminate" long distance with their iTalk service by offering customers an exclusive service called XL Calling Canada and XL Calling North America. By making Canada and the United States part of an extended local calling area, FCI Broadband was able to make any call local. Now iTalk customers can call anywhere in Canada or the United states and never have to pay long distance and they never have to dial ‘1'. FCI Broadband continues to add new and innovative products, services and features to their growing product set so they can continue to offer great service at great prices.
You could call anybody on FCI and there was no long distance. A practice followed only by Rogers.

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