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Which undergrad business-related program would you choose?

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Jan 7, 2009
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Geez, why do they have so many "business" programs? No wonder the poor kids are confused.
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^ Too late for Med School now, haha. Dentistry would been much easier but she can't stand the sight of blood during surgery. Maybe more horror flicks should be in store.
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Heard back good news from WLU. We attended a webinar and I couldn't believe what the fellow said --99% of co-op students land a stint but of course some are too picky or don't drive that working for some companies could be a major pain.

Co-op is compulsory for the double degree with Waterloo and therefore entry is automatic for students who progress to second year in the program. Employers post jobs and select the applicants they wish to hire. Students build their resume with work and volunteer experience, along with maintaining good grades, in order to be attractive candidates during the competitive recruitment process. We help students in the job search process by guiding them in developing their cover letter/resume and their interview skills.
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Okay, she got waitlisted at Queen's, lol.


I think what is really going around in our minds is how helpful the BMath degree from UWaterloo is (personal and workplace application instead of purely theoretical). From Reddit posts, it seems 25-30% of BBA/BMath drop out of the BMath portion after first year because the course load is intense. Even the Fin Math from Laurier pails in comparison to UWaterloo's BMath. :(

Edit: Didn't know UWaterloo has Data Science:
https://uwaterloo.ca/data-science/undergraduate-program

under the Act Sci/Stats department I believe. It's like peeling onion layers, haha.
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Dec 30, 2013
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alanbrenton wrote: Okay, she got waitlisted at Queen's, lol.


I think what is really going around in our minds is how helpful the BMath degree from UWaterloo is (personal and workplace application instead of purely theoretical). From Reddit posts, it seems 25-30% of BBA/BMath drop out of the BMath portion after first year because the course load is intense. Even the Fin Math from Laurier pails in comparison to UWaterloo's BMath. :(

Edit: Didn't know UWaterloo has Data Science:
https://uwaterloo.ca/data-science/undergraduate-program

under the Act Sci/Stats department I believe. It's like peeling onion layers, haha.
I just finished first year of BMath/BBA (Laurier Based). I wouldn't say that much drops out in first year. I have two friends that dropped to BBA only, and based on course enrollment numbers, I would say it's closer to 15% drop out in first year. It's a great program, but you really have to put the time into the math portion of it.
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AirbusA320 wrote: I just finished first year of BMath/BBA (Laurier Based). I wouldn't say that much drops out in first year. I have two friends that dropped to BBA only, and based on course enrollment numbers, I would say it's closer to 15% drop out in first year. It's a great program, but you really have to put the time into the math portion of it.
Good job.

Good to know there aren't many drop outs for your cohort and you like the program.

Are the BMath courses so rigid that one cannot pursue more Data Science stuff? I read most CS courses are reserved for CS majors though.
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Dec 30, 2013
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alanbrenton wrote: Good job.

Good to know there aren't many drop outs for your cohort and you like the program.

Are the BMath courses so rigid that one cannot pursue more Data Science stuff? I read most CS courses are reserved for CS majors though.
So for our degree, we have to take the standard math courses all Waterloo math students have to take (Algebra, Lin Alg I and II, Probability, Statistics, Calc I and II, CS I and II, and one of Calc III or Combinatorics). In addition to this, we need to take Intro to Financial Math, Intro to Optimization, CO370, CS330, STAT 371 and 372 for Double Degree. We end up with 7 Waterloo Math electives where you can take anything you want in the Faculty of Math, along with 4 general electives.

About your question on Data Science, I'm not that interested in pursuing it but from what I've heard, it's competitive entry with a minimum math average of 65 and CS average of 70. If you don't get in, you can only take CS 245 and 246 as a math student (which are CS major courses). For double degree, we don't have to major in any specific field, but people tend to do Stats, Act Sci or CO. The problem with majoring is that many majors require more than 7 courses so you'll use all your math electives plus some general electives to major in something. For example, Data Science requires 12 courses on top of all of the required DD math courses meaning you're probably going to have to do more than 52 courses to graduate.
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AirbusA320 wrote: So for our degree, we have to take the standard math courses all Waterloo math students have to take (Algebra, Lin Alg I and II, Probability, Statistics, Calc I and II, CS I and II, and one of Calc III or Combinatorics. In addition to this, we need to take Intro to Financial Math, Intro to Optimization, CO370, CS330, STAT 371 and 372 for Double Degree. We end up with 7 Waterloo Math electives where you can take anything you want in the Faculty of Math, along with 4 general electives.

About your question on Data Science, I'm not that interested in pursuing it but from what I've heard, it's competitive entry with a minimum math average of 65 and CS average of 70. If you don't get in, you can only take CS 245 and 246 as a math student (which are CS major courses). For double degree, we don't have to major in any specific field, but people tend to do Stats, Act Sci or CO. The problem with majoring is that many majors require more than 7 courses so you'll use all your math electives plus some general electives to major in something. For example, Data Science requires 12 courses on top of all of the required DD math courses meaning you're probably going to have to do more than 52 courses to graduate.
I am sure you got into other competitive business programs. Besides a guaranteed co-op participation and a dual degree, why did you go for this program?
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alanbrenton wrote: I am sure you got into other competitive business programs. Besides a guaranteed co-op participation and a dual degree, why did you go for this program?
LOL, wrong assumption. This is the only business program that I applied to. I actually applied to Management Eng, Planning, and Math DD at Waterloo, Math DD at Laurier, Math at UofT, and Concurrent Ed/Science at Queen's. I went for it because it seemed like the best out of what I applied to, but I was only really down to Management Eng and this. I didn't want to do Chem and Physics so I chose DD.
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What does your daughter actually want to do? It seems like you/her are all over the place (data science now???) If data science, get a waterloo CS degree. No need for anything else, this will be tough enough as it is and will place well into big-tech. If IB, go for math/bba dual degree. This will also place well into non-IB finance gigs as a backup. I'd advise against math/bba+data science, the career paths are very different.
"Because ten billion years' time is so fragile, so ephemeral... it arouses such a bittersweet, almost heartbreaking fondness."
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Mar 6, 2015
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I admire the daughter whose caring Dad takes up so much chores on post secondary education selections. Smiling Face With Open Mouth
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Jan 29, 2010
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Man I wished my parents cared about my education as much. Never really cared where I go. By happenstance, I was good at school and chose pursue university and chose a BBA and somehow got into a Big4.

Good on you for showing the different paths and best routes to your kid. I know I would've done some things differently if I had good advices and knowledge back then (eg. not stay in BC for university).
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Jan 17, 2018
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I'm curious why UofT isn't on the table? That's the first choice for my daughter. Is it because your daughter didn't get in? My daughter isn't a senior yet, but we have already looked at the requirements she needs so she can ensure she has the courses/grades needed to get in there.

It is nice and all to help one's kid out, but we can't do the degree for them, and hopefully you are realistic on what your kid can finish once they start it. The 4 year university slog is just that, a long slog. It helps them if they can somewhat have an interest in what they are studying!
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Jun 18, 2018
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Focus should be on interest, job prospects and work experience during those 4 years. Degree is meaningless if everyone has one.
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Jan 21, 2014
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I voted for Laurier. My nephew graduated the co-op program and made $70k right at the start. If I had my way, my daughter would be in business too. But she was dead set on medicine since grade 7 and never lost focus. Now all her cousins are out and working and she is still in school. After that It would be residency, fellowship, etc. I would say I will be retired before she starts her practice

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