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unemployed new grad needs help with next steps

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  • Aug 14th, 2021 2:23 pm
[OP]
Newbie
Dec 13, 2013
9 posts
4 upvotes

unemployed new grad needs help with next steps

I was advised to repost this here so here goes.

So I graduated from UofT with a science degree. I have CS and math minors, but my major is not related (and not something I want to pursue further)

My work history is all customer service and I have no desire of working directly with the general public ever again. I was planning to apply to nursing school, but after covid, I realized that if I did, I'll probably burn out and leave the field. I loved the job I had before, good pension but shit pay. The way the employer just dropped us the moment covid happened, I realized how worthless we are to them. The next time a disaster hits, I know it will happen again. I was fortunate enough to have a place to stay

I want to work in IT and I think I have the aptitude for it. Now I don't know where to go from here. My grades in the last two years are garbage (online university was not for me), so I probably cant get into SFU's 2nd degree in CS program or Concordia's graduate diploma.

The options I'm looking at right now are...
2nd degree CS from TRU or CIS from Athabasca - at least 2 years
Coding Bootcamp - 12 weeks
Humber college's UX design program (which has an internship component at the end) - 1 yr program including internship..

I want something that can help me get a well-paying career (like 50k starting) and offers reasonable job security?

I know people trash bootcamps but I thought having some CS formal education (plus a completed degree) might work in my favor?

which of these options do you think will pay off the most?

TIA!
7 replies
Member
May 27, 2007
202 posts
20 upvotes
ON
What actions can you take immediately related to the options you have outlined?
Deal Fanatic
Jul 13, 2009
5069 posts
3251 upvotes
Who trashes bootcamps? I just hired a whole team of kids who came from bootcamps and they have produced amazing things. One year college program with co-op should also be considered too.

Your minor in CS is already quite valuable, Maths too! Bootcamps are generally for those without CS and math backgrounds, however bootcamps are great for getting you immersed into good dev habits, engineering, problem solving, and learning languages/tools.

A formal degree may help in the long run for greater career progression, but for now you're in good shape and just need good working experience.
[OP]
Newbie
Dec 13, 2013
9 posts
4 upvotes
hozer wrote: What actions can you take immediately related to the options you have outlined?
thanks for your reply.
Humber's program starts in January. I think I would have to apply to bootcamp a few weeks before.

bhrm wrote: Who trashes bootcamps? I just hired a whole team of kids who came from bootcamps and they have produced amazing things. One year college program with co-op should also be considered too.

Your minor in CS is already quite valuable, Maths too! Bootcamps are generally for those without CS and math backgrounds, however bootcamps are great for getting you immersed into good dev habits, engineering, problem solving, and learning languages/tools.

A formal degree may help in the long run for greater career progression, but for now you're in good shape and just need good working experience.
thanks for your reply!

I have spoken to so many people who say that bootcamps are not worth the money and that the only successful bootcamp grads are those who come in with valuable/relevant prior experience (like someone with healthcare experience applying for a dev position in a company developing health-related software) or fancy/prestigious credentials like MBAs.

What you say is reassuring that there are jobs out there. It's a lot of money. I have so much debt already, so anything I do needs to have a good return on investment or I'll be screwed even more.

My long-term goal is eventually to get a CS degree, even if it's part-time. But for the time being, I can't afford to go back to school full time for longer than a year.
Member
May 27, 2007
202 posts
20 upvotes
ON
Purplewind wrote: Humber's program starts in January. I think I would have to apply to bootcamp a few weeks before.
Have you considered talking to the program instructors or grads? You may get better advice.
Purplewind wrote: I have spoken to so many people who say that bootcamps are not worth the money and that the only successful bootcamp grads are those who come in with valuable/relevant prior experience (like someone with healthcare experience applying for a dev position in a company developing health-related software) or fancy/prestigious credentials like MBAs.

What you say is reassuring that there are jobs out there. It's a lot of money. I have so much debt already, so anything I do needs to have a good return on investment or I'll be screwed even more.

My long-term goal is eventually to get a CS degree, even if it's part-time. But for the time being, I can't afford to go back to school full time for longer than a year.
Be attentive to others opinions, but no one has all the information you have about your situation. The bootcamps definitely have value if the right exit strategy, motivation, and attitude is taken. For those that have provided you that input, are they hiring managers you intend to work for? That's whos' opinion matters.

If you have CS and math minor, I'd strongly consider the bootcamps for dev or analytics / data science. With that, paired with strong networking with hiring managers at companies you'd like to work for. Finally, find volunteer or a part-time job that will get you experience or at least pay the bills if you need to relieve that pressure a bit.

I'm sure it doesn't sound easy, though it's doable - you aren't the first, and won't be the last. Good luck!
Deal Fanatic
Jul 13, 2009
5069 posts
3251 upvotes
Purplewind wrote: thanks for your reply.
Humber's program starts in January. I think I would have to apply to bootcamp a few weeks before.



thanks for your reply!

I have spoken to so many people who say that bootcamps are not worth the money and that the only successful bootcamp grads are those who come in with valuable/relevant prior experience (like someone with healthcare experience applying for a dev position in a company developing health-related software) or fancy/prestigious credentials like MBAs.

What you say is reassuring that there are jobs out there. It's a lot of money. I have so much debt already, so anything I do needs to have a good return on investment or I'll be screwed even more.

My long-term goal is eventually to get a CS degree, even if it's part-time. But for the time being, I can't afford to go back to school full time for longer than a year.
My favourite bootcamp kid was in retail. "Prior Experience" is irrelevant. Discipline, self motivation, and dedication is what came through with successful bootcamp grads. It's all about goal setting and hard work.

You may not need bootcamp either, self-study is another valid path and working on personal projects that can be used as examples of your work. Present your portfolio, explain your approach.

There's such a great demand for developers, don't listen to anecdotal naysayers.
Member
May 29, 2017
459 posts
366 upvotes
If you already have CS... why on earth are you taking a bootcamp? What exactly are you trying to learn that you think the bootcamp is going to teach you?

My old boss use to say is there's nothing wrong with hiring bootcamp candidates, its just they always are missing crucial foundations that they always need to learn themselves that are normally covered is traditional institutions. They aren't exactly bad hires, but you already have what you need.

Your grades mean jack to the world... its your knowledge. I would invest time into learning what's needed in the career you're looking for and not look to spend more money on a bootcamp.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Nov 4, 2008
7200 posts
8908 upvotes
Scarbs
My advice is to find few postings for dream jobs, understand what the requirements are, do a self assessment and analyze your gaps. Will those programs bridge those gaps?

I don't recommend jumping into more education unless you know what you want out of it. Otherwise its wasted time and money.
When given enough time, all threads on RFD can and will go off on a tangent.

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