Real Estate

Unionglen: Unionville x Angus Glen

  • Last Updated:
  • Sep 3rd, 2020 10:41 pm
Deal Fanatic
May 1, 2012
9457 posts
8519 upvotes
Markham
Kennedy / 16th --> going anywhere towards Woodbine or Highway 7 is brutal as hell. The most brutal time is anywhere past 8:20am.
Deal Addict
Dec 20, 2018
3929 posts
3128 upvotes
Jon Lai wrote: Yes, roads are definitely becoming narrower, which is another problem. New communities tend to be filled with single-garage properties (towns, semis, and even detached), which would be fine if the people who buy these properties take that into account when deciding to move in. Nope - most households have 3, if not 4 cars. This means every morning people are moving their cars in and out, putting them on the streets, on an already narrow street. I guess you can call it an intrinsic traffic calming "feature"!

Traditionally, cul-de-sacs were used actually for collecting snow. In new developments, they're just dumped on the side of the streets, in parks, etc. I'd much prefer them in cul-de-sacs.

Speaking of trails, I find new developments also have less % of them. Look at the Union Glen plan, how many trails do you see? Perhaps just one, going along the river. In older communities, you would have pathways between houses to make winding roads more accessible to pedestrians, which encourage walking. And let's be realistic, people who live in these neighbourhoods aren't overwhelmingly walking to work, they're walking for leisure.
Yes narrower streets are better at slowing down traffic than curves/bends and curb cuts without making since it doesnt increase danger for cyclists and pedestrians while also improving connectivity. As for garages, developments especially townhomes have double garages usually for past 5+ years or so to reflect the market demand.

trails that aren't part of a NHS or greenway aren't desirable. Older style subdivisions with curved roads and courts/cul de sacs needed these small trails because of poor connectivity and excessive travel time especially on foot which necessitate trails/paths especially ones between homes. These are not supported by crime prevention guidelines due to sight/visibility issues, petty crime and matter of maintenance.

basically, the old system of curves/bends and courts/cul de sacs were poor for connectivity, walking time and posed safety issues as well as maintenance. the snow stockpiling you mentioned on cul de sacs are highly undesirable and dangerous and pose liability concerns as well.
Deal Expert
May 30, 2005
44555 posts
5129 upvotes
Richmond Hill
StatsGuy wrote: Yes narrower streets are better at slowing down traffic than curves/bends and curb cuts without making since it doesnt increase danger for cyclists and pedestrians while also improving connectivity. As for garages, developments especially townhomes have double garages usually for past 5+ years or so to reflect the market demand.

trails that aren't part of a NHS or greenway aren't desirable. Older style subdivisions with curved roads and courts/cul de sacs needed these small trails because of poor connectivity and excessive travel time especially on foot which necessitate trails/paths especially ones between homes. These are not supported by crime prevention guidelines due to sight/visibility issues, petty crime and matter of maintenance.

basically, the old system of curves/bends and courts/cul de sacs were poor for connectivity, walking time and posed safety issues as well as maintenance. the snow stockpiling you mentioned on cul de sacs are highly undesirable and dangerous and pose liability concerns as well.
I guess we'll agree to disagree. There's already so little variation to cookie-cutter communities, the least we can do is to make streets unique. Grid layouts do nothing in this regard, every street running parallel to each other can easily be mistaken for the next.
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