Food & Drink

UrbanPoet's kitchen. Today I'm prepping a pork loin roast , and a side project... PEAMEAL BACON!

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  • Mar 17th, 2021 3:55 pm
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UrbanPoet's kitchen. Today I'm prepping a pork loin roast , and a side project... PEAMEAL BACON!

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I bought this really cheap piece of pork. It was HUGE! only $9 and a little over 6LB

I cut the thing right in half.
1 side of super fatty, the other side lean.

The fatty end I'm going to make as a roast on my BBQ smoked with apple wood chunks.
I injected with chicken broth spiced up with my home made dry rub.
Then I shmeared mustard all over it. Then coated with my dry rub + basil.
The mustard helps the seasoning stick. The acidity also helps the flavors penetrate.

This half of the pork is easily 2.5LB after trimming. I could easily feed a family of 4 with this roast!

side project , peameal bacon


I trimmed as much fat as I could off the leaner side of the pork. This came up to 1.85 LB after trimming all the fat.
I injected it with the same injection liquid from above.
The difference with this one is that I'm going to add curing salt. This stuff is sodium nitrite they use to make bacon, sausage, ham etc. However I'm going to use HALF the recommended suggestion.

-I mixed 1.3 grams of backwoods curing salt and a few grams of my home made dry rub (to give it some volume). Then I carefully coated it evenly across the pork loin.

-I then vacuum seal the pork. Thats going to sit in the fridge for 7 days to fully cure. I'll flip it every day so it cures evenly.

-when its done curing I'm going to paper towel dry. Then leave in the fridge over night uncovered to dry out.

-coat with corn meal

-BBQ apple wood smoked @ 275 until its almost cooked. I'm going to aim for a medium cook... Because its going to be cut into thin slices you pan fry for breakfast! OR if youre a naughty boy like me. You can have breakfast for dinner against all social conventions.


Why am I doing this? I could buy peameal bacon pretty cheap its $3.99/LB on sale... But that stuff is salty as hell , uses tons of preservatives, and has tons of liquid and phosphates in it! They're good, but I find them too salty!

But this meat cost me $1.50/LB! Probably closer to $2/LB after all the trimming. I reduce the preservatives and salt. I still use preservative, just not as much... Its required to get that ham like taste, texture & color.

I found this is a good exercise in eating cheap and kinda fancy.
When these are ton I'll post updates!
Let me know if you have any questions!

Want to recommend me any side dishes? I have a ton of broccoli, my favorite healthy vegetable. I also have water cress.

Edit : finalized pics of roast + pic of the slices!



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Last edited by UrbanPoet on Mar 8th, 2021 10:12 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Different meat and different curing styles but FWIW, 3% salt by meat weight is all you need to make pancetta (I use NaCl only).
I smile when I see container ships sailing past my house laden with stuff made in China
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I wish we had a smoker for this reason. Sounds amazing.
On a 'smart' device that isn't always so smart. So please forgive the autocorrects and typos. If it bothers you, then don't read my posts, but don't waste my time correcting me. If you can get past the typos, then my posts generally have some value.
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UrbanPoet wrote: What's holding you back?

You can get started with a weber kettle that you can find used for $100 easy on kijiji
Time, space, energy. I have a bad habit of buying a lot of cooking things and mot using it. I bought a small smoker for hubby a few years ago, he didn’t use it so we returned it. We are planning major renos next year so the rule is no new things to distract us or things that take space. Our good friend made his own smoker using some sort of barrel and it’s pretty amazing.

I honestly don’t have the time or the energy as there has been a lot stuff going on with work and serious medical issues with my family members. I do enjoy your posts.
On a 'smart' device that isn't always so smart. So please forgive the autocorrects and typos. If it bothers you, then don't read my posts, but don't waste my time correcting me. If you can get past the typos, then my posts generally have some value.
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That is a small pork loin. They are usually 6-9 lbs, 7.5 lbs average. The fatty end is the rib end, & the other is the sirloin end. 2.5 lbs should give you 6 X 6 oz servings, so you can realistically feed a bigger family.

The cure is something like 0.6% sodium nitrite, 95% salt & sugar & fresh pork is normally seasoned with a mild salt water brine, so you may not have needed those in your rub/injector. You may come closer to commercial levels of saltiness/sweetness as a result. You may want to rinse it after to get the excess salt off. For standard prep, you would use just allspice/cloves (& perhaps neutral spices like paprika, onion, garlic) & rinse off the excess cure off after curing, then pat dry & air off. I would suggest you do not skip the rinse.

I agree that commercial cures are crazily salty. Looking forward to the end result!
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lecale wrote: That is a small pork loin. They are usually 6-9 lbs, 7.5 lbs average. The fatty end is the rib end, & the other is the sirloin end. 2.5 lbs should give you 6 X 6 oz servings, so you can realistically feed a bigger family.

The cure is something like 0.6% sodium nitrite, 95% salt & sugar & fresh pork is normally seasoned with a mild salt water brine, so you may not have needed those in your rub/injector. You may come closer to commercial levels of saltiness/sweetness as a result. You may want to rinse it after to get the excess salt off. For standard prep, you would use just allspice/cloves (& perhaps neutral spices like paprika, onion, garlic) & rinse off the excess cure off after curing, then pat dry & air off. I would suggest you do not skip the rinse.

I agree that commercial cures are crazily salty. Looking forward to the end result!
No idea exactly how much. I honestly just eye ball everything. And it just works out lol.
The injection only had aprox. 1 tea spoon of my dry rub. Its want i call a sprinkle.

The cure was mixed with the same sprinkle. Probably a teaspoon.

I didnt end up using all the injection. Had to toss out most of it.

Its for sure gonna take a cold water bath and a few rinses before i start the drying, corn meal roll and smoking.

That should take out most of the salt! That store bought stuff is brutally salty. I think anything is better!

Back to roast!

OP updated with my roast. Its 3:20PM.
ETA 6pm dinner?

Its currently -1 in Toronto with a low of -7
Keeping nice and toasty with a 40,000btu propane heater!
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You sitting out with the roast the whole cook?
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Roasting done!
Took a total of 2 hours.

Turned out suuuper juicy. A little too rich and fatty on that outer part, you could probably tell. I cooked it fat facing down too! But it was like intramuscular fat. Fat blob right through the middle there.
The leaner parts were good for me. Some people like those really fatty pieces. I enjoy them, but only maybe 2 pieces before the fat is too much... those pieces will probably be really good as left overs pan fried. Chopped up in a tomato, cheese & mustard/mayo sandwich!
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UrbanPoet wrote: Roasting done!
Took a total of 2 hours.

Turned out suuuper juicy. A little too rich and fatty on that outer part, you could probably tell. I cooked it fat facing down too! But it was like intramuscular fat. Fat blob right through the middle there.
The leaner parts were good for me. Some people like those really fatty pieces. I enjoy them, but only maybe 2 pieces before the fat is too much... those pieces will probably be really good as left overs pan fried. Chopped up in a tomato, cheese & mustard/mayo sandwich!
Wow, that looks way WAY too fatty everywhere for me to even attempt to eat one piece, but that’s just me.
A+ on your effort and time doing this though.
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UrbanPoet wrote:
Why am I doing this? I could buy peameal bacon pretty cheap its $3.99/LB on sale... But that stuff is salty as hell , uses tons of preservatives, and has tons of liquid and phosphates in it! They're good, but I find them too salty!
I hear you on this, especially if you store the stuff in the freezer before you use it. That said I did find one brand that I have now been buying for the past two years and I have yet to find it "salty". Here is the product, available at most Sobey's outlets, in case you have never tried it:

https://www.compliments.ca/en/products/ ... xtra-lean/
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Bebo123 wrote: Wow, that looks way WAY too fatty everywhere for me to even attempt to eat one piece, but that’s just me.
A+ on your effort and time doing this though.
Yep... i thought so too.
Its my first time cooking a pork roast like this. My intention was to get a big lean pork loin, but i bought the big thing bc it was cheap and didnt look lol.

Looking closely there is a leaner loin piece which i separated.

If you look carefully @ the sliced pics... theres the fatty flap on the left & lean piece on the right.

I’m going to treat those fatty pieces like bacon since its smoked up, it’ll taste like it. I’ll pan fry it crispy which will render out a bunch of fat. Have it with eggs & toast. Or like a BLT.
rcmpvet wrote: I hear you on this, especially if you store the stuff in the freezer before you use it. That said I did find one brand that I have now been buying for the past two years and I have yet to find it "salty". Here is the product, available at most Sobey's outlets, in case you have never tried it:

https://www.compliments.ca/en/products/ ... xtra-lean/
If i’m ever too lazy to make my own... i’ll give it a shot!
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Do you think that blowtorching the roast would have reduced the exterior fat and given it a nice crust? or would blowtorching have just scorched the rub making it perhaps bitter?

Sliced pieces with intramuscular fat stir fried with veggies, Asian style.

====

Edit: here's an example, but with ribs.

Blowtorched Ribs

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aviador wrote: Do you think that blowtorching the roast would have reduced the exterior fat and given it a nice crust? or would blowtorching have just scorched the rub making it perhaps bitter?

Sliced pieces with intramuscular fat stir fried with veggies, Asian style.

====

Edit: here's an example, but with ribs.

Blowtorched Ribs
probably make it bitter or burny. There's basil on there. It'll burn easily.
The fat is also intramuscular. So it'll do little in rendering that fat out. Even a long slow cook doesnt render much out because its insulated there with muscle.

If I didnt use the basil, I could have torched it. I don't torch often with these kinda cooks because If I got hot coal on, I could just sear it on the coals for color if needed.
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UrbanPoet wrote: Yep... i thought so too.
Its my first time cooking a pork roast like this. My intention was to get a big lean pork loin, but i bought the big thing bc it was cheap and didnt look lol.

Looking closely there is a leaner loin piece which i separated.

If you look carefully @ the sliced pics... theres the fatty flap on the left & lean piece on the right.

I’m going to treat those fatty pieces like bacon since its smoked up, it’ll taste like it. I’ll pan fry it crispy which will render out a bunch of fat. Have it with eggs & toast. Or like a BLT.



If i’m ever too lazy to make my own... i’ll give it a shot!
When you serve the fatty end of the roast, cut the slices in half & stack them so you get a bit of fat & lean in each bite & it balances the richness.

At the sirloin end there is always a circle of fat with a small eye of meat in it. That is the end you trimmed for peameal bacon.

As you progress to & through the rib end (which is the end that you smoked) both the eye of meat & the fat around it gets bigger, becoming 1/2 your slice, & at the very tip it is all fat. The fat is suet which can be rendered for lard. People ask how they can get some here on rfd sometimes. It has other uses.

I usually chip a larger loin into 1/3s, & the fattiest bit is good for something along the lines of cha siu. If you cut it into strips, you get a chance to trim it a bit closer, & that recipe requires fattier pork to begin with.

Maybe the ideal approach if you want a lean segment is to peel off the eye of meat with the cowl of fat around it, leaving just the lean part of the loin. Then you have a fat-cowled piece that starts about the size of a circle made my your finger & thumb & ends up about 1/2 the diameter of the loin. You should be able to pull it out with your hands in part so it is not all knife work. You can carve/pull the fatty portion into 2 component parts, reserving the suet for another use & the meat for stew (because it is not going to come out as a roastable-shaped piece) or keep it together, cut it in strips, trim it a bit, & make cha siu or bacon with it.

Irregular bits of bacon are great for starting lots of dishes. I did up diced bacon, caramelized some onions in it, gave it a sprinkle of flour & quick cook, added 2 blocks frozen spinach & lemon, salt, pepper for a side for some quiche this week. I am going to make a seafood chowder with the rest of my non-strip bacon. Portion it for the freezer in 1/4 lb bags & it is very handy to have.

If you do stew you can fry out a chunk of suet, discard the solids left over, use it to brown your meat for flavour's sake.
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lecale wrote: When you serve the fatty end of the roast, cut the slices in half & stack them so you get a bit of fat & lean in each bite & it balances the richness.

At the sirloin end there is always a circle of fat with a small eye of meat in it. That is the end you trimmed for peameal bacon.

As you progress to & through the rib end (which is the end that you smoked) both the eye of meat & the fat around it gets bigger, becoming 1/2 your slice, & at the very tip it is all fat. The fat is suet which can be rendered for lard. People ask how they can get some here on rfd sometimes. It has other uses.

I usually chip a larger loin into 1/3s, & the fattiest bit is good for something along the lines of cha siu. If you cut it into strips, you get a chance to trim it a bit closer, & that recipe requires fattier pork to begin with.

Maybe the ideal approach if you want a lean segment is to peel off the eye of meat with the cowl of fat around it, leaving just the lean part of the loin. Then you have a fat-cowled piece that starts about the size of a circle made my your finger & thumb & ends up about 1/2 the diameter of the loin. You should be able to pull it out with your hands in part so it is not all knife work. You can carve/pull the fatty portion into 2 component parts, reserving the suet for another use & the meat for stew (because it is not going to come out as a roastable-shaped piece) or keep it together, cut it in strips, trim it a bit, & make cha siu or bacon with it.

Irregular bits of bacon are great for starting lots of dishes. I did up diced bacon, caramelized some onions in it, gave it a sprinkle of flour & quick cook, added 2 blocks frozen spinach & lemon, salt, pepper for a side for some quiche this week. I am going to make a seafood chowder with the rest of my non-strip bacon. Portion it for the freezer in 1/4 lb bags & it is very handy to have.

If you do stew you can fry out a chunk of suet, discard the solids left over, use it to brown your meat for flavour's sake.
Good idea!

This morning i fried some slices up and treated it as bacon with eggs and toast. Tasted just like bacon. The 2 hours of apple wood smoke was enough to flavour it.

Wow look @ all that fat rendered out... lol.
The fatty pieces area actually really good fried up like this... 10x better then before.
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UrbanPoet wrote: Good idea!

This morning i fried some slices up and treated it as bacon with eggs and toast. Tasted just like bacon. The 2 hours of apple wood smoke was enough to flavour it.

Wow look @ all that fat rendered out... lol.
The fatty pieces area actually really good fried up like this... 10x better then before.
The fat probably has some good smoke flavour to it. To hell with the bottled smoke, use this stuff in recipes.

I would run it through a fine sieve into a heat-proof bowl while it is still hot, & transfer it to a container after it cools down a bit. Stick it in the coldest part of the fridge. I always find the pickle jar ends up being pushed back there & freezing, so having my rendered fats back there keeps that from happening, ha ha. If you do not filter it the bits make it go rancid, but in Europe fresh rendered lard with bits is used as a spread for bread & you can buy it ready-made at delis. It is something like maybe 1/4 of those slices minced fine, mixed in all that fat & chilled, spread on rye. Made like that it stays fresh a week or so.

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