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Urgent concrete rebar sidewalk question

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  • Aug 22nd, 2019 1:48 pm
[OP]
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Oct 24, 2011
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Urgent concrete rebar sidewalk question

Hello folks
I would like to ask for help/advise badly.
I am doing sidewalk aggregate, 4' wide with 2.5 inches stone for level and 4 inches thickness concrete.
Contractors already finished digging, put stone and rebar today...
See the pics attached

My vendor is saying rebar will be connected from house foundation to STONE, not concrete to avoid concrete movement and cracks during winter time.

I am not entirely sure if is true, as far as I know I thought rebar is supposed to connect to 1 inch from the bottom location, or even center to give support.

He will use wire mesh as well tomorrow... but if what I know about rebar to concrete, not stone is correct I wanna correct him tomorrow....

Please let me know

Thanks!
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15 replies
[OP]
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Oct 24, 2011
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I forgot to mention, house was built in 2013 November
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Dec 26, 2005
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Thornhill
Confused - you mean the contractor is saying the rebar will connect the foundation to the aggregate?

bjl
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Jun 8, 2004
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Oakville
Your sidewalk shouldnt be tied into the foundation.

I have an exposed aggregate driveway and walkway. They put a foam spacer between it and the foundation. My driveway heaves up an inch in the winter an settles back down in spring. If it was connected, it would have wrecked my foundation.

Not even sure why they needed that rebar into the foundation.
[OP]
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t3359 wrote: Confused - you mean the contractor is saying the rebar will connect the foundation to the aggregate?

bjl
Hey sorry for confusion
The guy is saying the rebar will connect from house foundation (where they drilled), between stone and concrete.

He is trying to avoid connect to concrete directly because concrete might move or sink even little bit and during winter water might freeze in the gab...etc

I was kinda confused...
[OP]
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cba123 wrote: Your sidewalk shouldnt be tied into the foundation.

I have an exposed aggregate driveway and walkway. They put a foam spacer between it and the foundation. My driveway heaves up an inch in the winter an settles back down in spring. If it was connected, it would have wrecked my foundation.

Not even sure why they needed that rebar into the foundation.
They are gonna put wire mesh tied to the bar I think, so I guess not connecting to concrete is right idea then... from foundation
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Nov 24, 2015
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Durham Region
Not sure why the rebar drilled to foundation is there at all. I would have thought they would want to make it independent to allow for some frost heave
But with proper base and drainage layer heave should be minimal
The way the rebar is sticking up it will be into the concrete though
[OP]
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Oct 24, 2011
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networksend wrote: Not sure why the rebar drilled to foundation is there at all. I would have thought they would want to make it independent to allow for some frost heave
But with proper base and drainage layer heave should be minimal
The way the rebar is sticking up it will be into the concrete though
Contractor did mention that he would straight the bar ... I don't even know what that means, and not sure how he would use wiremeah either....
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I get the sense that... the rebar is anchored to the (stable) foundation, and designed to sit "under" the pathway concrete slabs, like a forklift (embeded right at the top of and level with the crushed stone/gravel layer.)

That way the slabs can still frost heave *up* independently when needed, but will not settle any lower than the rebar line on the foundation, possible to ensure levelness and ensure drainage away from the foundation.

No idea if it is a correct technique, but that's what I think the intent would be based on OP's descriptions?
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[OP]
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Oct 24, 2011
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hoob wrote: I get the sense that... the rebar is anchored to the (stable) foundation, and designed to sit "under" the pathway concrete slabs, like a forklift (embeded right at the top of the crushed stone/gravel layer.)

That way the slabs can still frost heave *up* independently when needed, but will not settle any lower than the rebar line on the foundation, possible to ensure levelness and ensure drainage away from the foundation.

No idea if it is a correct technique, but that's what I think the intent would be based on OP's descriptions?
That's what I believe he is doing.
But I've never seen anyone doing rebar to stone.... not concrete.
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Jun 8, 2004
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Still not sure of why they needed to drill holes into your foundation in the first place, compromising the exterior waterproofing of your foundation in the process.

Water will get into those holes. The freeze and thaw cycles will cause damage to the foundation.
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Oct 19, 2008
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Epoxy coated rebar should have been used with ends sealed. That rebar will sit below grade exposed to water, its only contained where it sits in building foundation.
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cba123 wrote: Still not sure of why they needed to drill holes into your foundation in the first place, compromising the exterior waterproofing of your foundation in the process.

Water will get into those holes. The freeze and thaw cycles will cause damage to the foundation.
Yeah, that was also surprising. I suppose they epoxied them in already. I would consider cutting them off, sealing the holes, then sticking on an adhesive membrane at this point (e.g., Bluskin). Water may still seep through the concrete and/or rust whatever rebar remains embedded in the foundation, but I'm not sure what else you can do at this point.

Does the rebar go all the way through?

bjl
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The first pic doesn't look like any epoxy sealing. Just a rebar jambed into a hole drilled into the foundation. No visible membrane either so either grading was raised above the membrane or house didn't have any exterior waterproofing.
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Nov 9, 2008
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This seems like a bad idea. Concrete slabs should NOT be tied to your foundation. They should be allowed to be free floating, with an expansion joint between the slab and your foundation. Asphalt/tar impregnated felt is typically used for sidewalk expansion joints.
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jacquesstrap wrote: This seems like a bad idea. Concrete slabs should NOT be tied to your foundation. They should be allowed to be free floating, with an expansion joint between the slab and your foundation. Asphalt/tar impregnated felt is typically used for sidewalk expansion joints.
Well the question is , what is the OP supposed to do now? fire the contractor? Contractors don't like to be second guessed.

Side walk will heave rebar or not. If its tied to the foundation, it mean it will heave more on the outside than on the inside creating a slope for water runoff into the foundation.


I would rather have the contractor seal up those holes and put in 6" Concrete sidewalk.
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