Home & Garden

Using Vinyl flooring in Kitchen [Post 10]

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  • Oct 19th, 2020 4:07 pm
[OP]
Jr. Member
Apr 6, 2019
139 posts
26 upvotes
GTA

Using Vinyl flooring in Kitchen [Post 10]

Edit : Rather than posting separate thread for every new question/update, I will be updating this same thread and mention the post number in the thread title. Link to the latest post is also mentioned below.

Link to the latest post : using-vinyl-flooring-kitchen-post-10-2406001/#p33291890

Hi Friends,

Am looking to bring a newer fresher look to my home and am planning on getting below mentioned things done. Its a 2 story traditional townhouse in Durham region, and total area is approx. 1800 sq feet

1. Kitchen : Plan to keep the current layout of kitchen and get the current one refaced/refinished. Also, a new counter top, probably quartz, backsplash and some lighting.

2. New Flooring : Looking to get new flooring throughout everywhere. Currently there are tiles in kitchen and foyer, laminate everywhere in ground/main floor and carpet on 2nd floor My plan is to get new tiles in kitchen ONLY, luxury vinyl everywhere, and replace the carpets with luxury vinyl.

3. Paint : Looking to get a new fresh neutral tone, greyish color throughout, for the whole house, including painting the exterior

4. Lighting: Thinking about getting some pot lights installed, and may be some lightning fixtures in kitchen

5. Bathroom : New vanities perhaps, and some minor renos

So I was wondering which of the above task can I do myself as DIY or should I outsource them all ? Which one of these would be easiest as DIY and which ones you think must be done by professional.

Also would be nice to hear some recommendations, for hiring the right guys for these jobs. I plan to keep this as cost effective as possible, but I don't want to compromise on quality either. So would say I have a moderate budget for the job.

This is going to be my first renovation project, so would like to hear some pointers, what to do / not do.

Thanks
Last edited by webester on Oct 16th, 2020 9:57 pm, edited 2 times in total.
13 replies
Deal Expert
Feb 7, 2017
15037 posts
12137 upvotes
Eastern Ontario
Sounds to me like you are a total Reno Newbie ...
In which case start yourself off small and see how that goes

Easiest DIY ... Paint

And also the cheapest
And most forgiving ... mess up
You can just paint over (or hire someone to do it)

Prep & Paint a room and then you’ll be able to gauge how handy you really are
Success builds confidence

BUT before you get too cocky
Make your second DIY Project ... a run at hanging wallpaper

Also not a huge expense job ... that can be easily remedied if it really goes south on you

Wallpaper is a medium difficulty job
(But definitely has stressed out many a couple / marriage)

If you can succeed at wallpaper

Then you can certainly take on bigger projects
That will require the elements of measuring, cutting, installing, etc
Like laying tiles

If you cannot get thru the wallpaper exercise relatively unscathed
Then you know you aren’t really cut out for DIY projects
Like tiles, baseboards, crown mouldings, cabinet refacing

BTW ... when it comes to Reno’s
DIYing is usually much cheaper than hiring
IF YOU’VE DONE YOUR HOMEWORK
ON HOW TO DO THE JOB CORRECTLY
Incorrectly ... then it’s lipstick on a pig
And a waste of money
The trade off with DIY vs Hiring
Is it’s cheaper ... but it will take you far longer than hiring someone
DIY Projects make for a good hobby / pastime
Esp if you have friends in the same boat with their houses
They help you with your projects
You help them with theirs

And somethings are better left to the Pros
In my mind that’s ... Electrical, All but basic replacement plumbing, HVAC, and stone work, including countertops
Mess these up, and it’s a headache to fix ... and way more costly than getting them done right the first time
Deal Addict
Sep 6, 2017
3178 posts
1888 upvotes
Yeah, painting is the easiest and even high school kids offer painting in the summer at an hourly rate.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Apr 6, 2019
139 posts
26 upvotes
GTA
PointsHubby wrote: Sounds to me like you are a total Reno Newbie ...
In which case start yourself off small and see how that goes

Easiest DIY ... Paint

And also the cheapest
And most forgiving ... mess up
You can just paint over (or hire someone to do it)

Prep & Paint a room and then you’ll be able to gauge how handy you really are
Success builds confidence

BUT before you get too cocky
Make your second DIY Project ... a run at hanging wallpaper

Also not a huge expense job ... that can be easily remedied if it really goes south on you

Wallpaper is a medium difficulty job
(But definitely has stressed out many a couple / marriage)

If you can succeed at wallpaper

Then you can certainly take on bigger projects
That will require the elements of measuring, cutting, installing, etc
Like laying tiles

If you cannot get thru the wallpaper exercise relatively unscathed
Then you know you aren’t really cut out for DIY projects
Like tiles, baseboards, crown mouldings, cabinet refacing

BTW ... when it comes to Reno’s
DIYing is usually much cheaper than hiring
IF YOU’VE DONE YOUR HOMEWORK
ON HOW TO DO THE JOB CORRECTLY
Incorrectly ... then it’s lipstick on a pig
And a waste of money
The trade off with DIY vs Hiring
Is it’s cheaper ... but it will take you far longer than hiring someone
DIY Projects make for a good hobby / pastime
Esp if you have friends in the same boat with their houses
They help you with your projects
You help them with theirs

And somethings are better left to the Pros
In my mind that’s ... Electrical, All but basic replacement plumbing, HVAC, and stone work, including countertops
Mess these up, and it’s a headache to fix ... and way more costly than getting them done right the first time
Yeah exactly, newbie to Renos.

Actually I already tried painting, and painted one of the walls in my room. It went fine and I think I can do the painting task myself, but as you said it takes time. Also I really want to have a great final result, so I was thinking may be getting it done through a professional would lead to best result.

Can you or anyone share an estimate on how much these tasks would cost individually?, so I'll have an idea how much I'd be able to save. Material costs is going to be there in all cases, the labor cost would be the difference.
Deal Expert
Feb 7, 2017
15037 posts
12137 upvotes
Eastern Ontario
webester wrote: Yeah exactly, newbie to Renos.

Actually I already tried painting, and painted one of the walls in my room. It went fine and I think I can do the painting task myself, but as you said it takes time. Also I really want to have a great final result, so I was thinking may be getting it done through a professional would lead to best result.

Can you or anyone share an estimate on how much these tasks would cost individually?, so I'll have an idea how much I'd be able to save. Material costs is going to be there in all cases, the labor cost would be the difference.
Most Pro Painters Charge between $ 35 and $ 50 an hour in Canada’s Major Cities
(Don’t know where you are ... you really should UPDATE YOUR RFD PROFILE to show some sort of location ... be it your hometown, nearby big city, Region or Province ... invaluable for these types of Questions where costs can differ greatly across Canada )

About 10 years ago
While living in Ottawa, I painted my whole house interior over a winter
Ceilings, Trim, Walls, Closets ... the works
Was burned out by the time we got to the upstairs (started with the main floor and the rooms visitors see )

Hired 2 Pro Painters to paint our large Master Bedroom & En-suite
They were at the house for 2-1/2 Days to do the entire job
From prepping the walls, sanding repairs, primer and paint
I supplied the materials
Between materials and their fee (they quoted on the whole job ... not by the hour)
It cost me around $ 1000 ... including taxes

So not cheap

Worth it from the perspective of I was burned out ... and just wanted to finish

But ya a lot of money for something that technically I can do myself
(BTW ... SO was very happy to pay ... as they were very sick of living in a Reno for months on end )
[OP]
Jr. Member
Apr 6, 2019
139 posts
26 upvotes
GTA
PointsHubby wrote: Most Pro Painters Charge between $ 35 and $ 50 an hour in Canada’s Major Cities
(Don’t know where you are ... you really should UPDATE YOUR RFD PROFILE to show some sort of location ... be it your hometown, nearby big city, Region or Province ... invaluable for these types of Questions where costs can differ greatly across Canada )

About 10 years ago
While living in Ottawa, I painted my whole house interior over a winter
Ceilings, Trim, Walls, Closets ... the works
Was burned out by the time we got to the upstairs (started with the main floor and the rooms visitors see )

Hired 2 Pro Painters to paint our large Master Bedroom & En-suite
They were at the house for 2-1/2 Days to do the entire job
From prepping the walls, sanding repairs, primer and paint
I supplied the materials
Between materials and their fee (they quoted on the whole job ... not by the hour)
It cost me around $ 1000 ... including taxes

So not cheap

Worth it from the perspective of I was burned out ... and just wanted to finish

But ya a lot of money for something that technically I can do myself
(BTW ... SO was very happy to pay ... as they were very sick of living in a Reno for months on end )
Thanks. Yeah I never realised I haven't mentioned in my profile, I am in Whitby and will update my profile now. 1000 seems reasonable though but oh that was 10 yrs ago..
Deal Addict
Jul 2, 2006
1388 posts
552 upvotes
Toronto
webester wrote: Hi Friends,

Am looking to bring a newer fresher look to my home and am planning on getting below mentioned things done. Its a 2 story traditional townhouse in Durham region, and total area is approx. 1800 sq feet

1. Kitchen : Plan to keep the current layout of kitchen and get the current one refaced/refinished. Also, a new counter top, probably quartz, backsplash and some lighting.

2. New Flooring : Looking to get new flooring throughout everywhere. Currently there are tiles in kitchen and foyer, laminate everywhere in ground/main floor and carpet on 2nd floor My plan is to get new tiles in kitchen ONLY, luxury vinyl everywhere, and replace the carpets with luxury vinyl.

3. Paint : Looking to get a new fresh neutral tone, greyish color throughout, for the whole house, including painting the exterior

4. Lighting: Thinking about getting some pot lights installed, and may be some lightning fixtures in kitchen

5. Bathroom : New vanities perhaps, and some minor renos

So I was wondering which of the above task can I do myself as DIY or should I outsource them all ? Which one of these would be easiest as DIY and which ones you think must be done by professional.

Also would be nice to hear some recommendations, for hiring the right guys for these jobs. I plan to keep this as cost effective as possible, but I don't want to compromise on quality either. So would say I have a moderate budget for the job.

This is going to be my first renovation project, so would like to hear some pointers, what to do / not do.

Thanks
Did some work recently too and these were the going rates from the quotes I have been getting:

1) Kitchen Refinishing - would largely depend on how big your kitchen is but I would say to refinish, quartz, and backsplash would be around $5-8k
2) New flooring - Laminate / LVP - around $3 per sqft for removal and installation + $materials, Hardwood - around $5 per sqft for removal and installation + $materials, Tiles - around $10 per sqft for removal and installation + $materials
3) Paint - around $3k for whole house painting
4) Lighting - Pot lights are around $70-90 each, ceiling box are $50 each
5) Bathroom - vanity around $900 installed
Deal Addict
Dec 6, 2006
4960 posts
1352 upvotes
Toronto
For DIY with new/no experience, painting for sure, and perhaps bathroom vanity IF you don't have to re-do major plumbing. Just swapping vanity and put on new p-trap is relatively easy.

The other ones can get quite big for new DIYer or safety concern (electrical) IMO.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Apr 6, 2019
139 posts
26 upvotes
GTA
bst wrote: Did some work recently too and these were the going rates from the quotes I have been getting:

1) Kitchen Refinishing - would largely depend on how big your kitchen is but I would say to refinish, quartz, and backsplash would be around $5-8k
2) New flooring - Laminate / LVP - around $3 per sqft for removal and installation + $materials, Hardwood - around $5 per sqft for removal and installation + $materials, Tiles - around $10 per sqft for removal and installation + $materials
3) Paint - around $3k for whole house painting
4) Lighting - Pot lights are around $70-90 each, ceiling box are $50 each
5) Bathroom - vanity around $900 installed
Thank you, this is very helpful. If you can share the guys you used, I can may be get a quote from them too.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Apr 6, 2019
139 posts
26 upvotes
GTA
Hey friends

As mentioned earlier am planning to have vinyl flooring everywhere, including kitchen.

I have couple of questions, specially about vinyl flooring in Kitchen

1. Currently I have ceramic tiles installed in kitchen. Should the vinyl be installed on top of tiles or the tiles should be removed first? As of now my kitchen's floor height and living floor height isn't same. Kitchen floor is almost 1or 2 inches higher than flooring in living room (I think it's due to the fact that the builder used a thicker base for tiles)

2. Having vinyl flooring in Kitchen is good idea or bad? I have received some quotes and have heard mixed opinions.

3. My current cabinets are placed on the tiles flooring. So If I get the vinyl flooring installed, can those cabinets be placed same way over vinyl flooring? One of the guys said I cannot have cabinets placed on top of vinyl flooring, as it expands/contracts. So the area where cabinets would be placed, won't have vinyl flooring underneath.

Thanks
Deal Addict
Sep 13, 2016
2423 posts
1258 upvotes
Mississauga
webester wrote: Hey friends

As mentioned earlier am planning to have vinyl flooring everywhere, including kitchen.

I have couple of questions, specially about vinyl flooring in Kitchen

1. Currently I have ceramic tiles installed in kitchen. Should the vinyl be installed on top of tiles or the tiles should be removed first? As of now my kitchen's floor height and living floor height isn't same. Kitchen floor is almost 1or 2 inches higher than flooring in living room (I think it's due to the fact that the builder used a thicker base for tiles)

2. Having vinyl flooring in Kitchen is good idea or bad? I have received some quotes and have heard mixed opinions.

3. My current cabinets are placed on the tiles flooring. So If I get the vinyl flooring installed, can those cabinets be placed same way over vinyl flooring? One of the guys said I cannot have cabinets placed on top of vinyl flooring, as it expands/contracts. So the area where cabinets would be placed, won't have vinyl flooring underneath.

Thanks
1. You will get mixed opinions on this here on RFD. Some would say that you should rip off the tiles before you put vinyl and that is the right way to do it. Though there is no scientific reasoning why this is the right way. Some would say that installing vinyl over tiles is the way to go since tiles, if they are in not cracked everywhere, povide a sturdy level surface for vinyl.
Ao essentially it is upto what you prefer. Just remember that there will be some transition of height in different areas of your home.
2. More and more prefer are going to vinyl in kitchen. One, luxury vinyl does not look cheap like stick on vinyl. There are so many options available in both wood as well as tile look. Second, they are pretty resistant against water, which is a plus for kitchen. Third, easier to clean and maintain.
3. Yes you can place cabinets over vinyl flooring. I redid my kitchen cabinets and had entire floor done in LVT first, and then cabinets were installed over that. I have not seen any problems in last 1 year. Flooring around cabinets might not look as good. If you go this route, it might be a good idea to install quarter rounds around cabinet footing to hide the gap between floor and cabinets.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Apr 6, 2019
139 posts
26 upvotes
GTA
IndyBeak wrote: 1. You will get mixed opinions on this here on RFD. Some would say that you should rip off the tiles before you put vinyl and that is the right way to do it. Though there is no scientific reasoning why this is the right way. Some would say that installing vinyl over tiles is the way to go since tiles, if they are in not cracked everywhere, povide a sturdy level surface for vinyl.
Ao essentially it is upto what you prefer. Just remember that there will be some transition of height in different areas of your home.
2. More and more prefer are going to vinyl in kitchen. One, luxury vinyl does not look cheap like stick on vinyl. There are so many options available in both wood as well as tile look. Second, they are pretty resistant against water, which is a plus for kitchen. Third, easier to clean and maintain.
3. Yes you can place cabinets over vinyl flooring. I redid my kitchen cabinets and had entire floor done in LVT first, and then cabinets were installed over that. I have not seen any problems in last 1 year. Flooring around cabinets might not look as good. If you go this route, it might be a good idea to install quarter rounds around cabinet footing to hide the gap between floor and cabinets.
Great thanks. Some follow up points.

1. Why there would still be some transition of heights in different areas? The only reason I really wanted to remove tiles and get vinyl everywhere was to make sure that flooring is at same level everywhere and we won't have quarter rounds anywhere. If its still going to be a floor with different heights I think it would be better to install vinyl on top of tiles? That would save money too, removal and disposal of tiles is kinda expensive.
2. Great, I was also thinking the same,
3. That's a relief then. The guy told me you cannot place your cabinets on vinyl flooring, because it would crack the flooring, as vinyl flooring contracts in winters and expands in summers. I was kind of surprised to hear that we cannot put cabinets on top of vinyl.
Deal Addict
Sep 13, 2016
2423 posts
1258 upvotes
Mississauga
webester wrote: Great thanks. Some follow up points.

1. Why there would still be some transition of heights in different areas? The only reason I really wanted to remove tiles and get vinyl everywhere was to make sure that flooring is at same level everywhere and we won't have quarter rounds anywhere. If its still going to be a floor with different heights I think it would be better to install vinyl on top of tiles? That would save money too, removal and disposal of tiles is kinda expensive.
2. Great, I was also thinking the same,
3. That's a relief then. The guy told me you cannot place your cabinets on vinyl flooring, because it would crack the flooring, as vinyl flooring contracts in winters and expands in summers. I was kind of surprised to hear that we cannot put cabinets on top of vinyl.
1. If I understand correctly, under any flooring inside the house, there would be plywood sheets, so at that level all areas are same height. But as you add different materials with different thickness, there may be a height transition, could be just 1 mm, could be 1cm. You can never tell with certainly. So if you are doing vinyl throughout the floor, then it will come down to installation method. If you ripping all the current flooring out and going down to the plywood level, then the resulting floor should be same height everywhere. But this is going to cost quite a bit. If you are going to install vinyl over whatever flooring material you already have, then if you current floor is level everywhere, the new floor would be as well.
3. Yes, vinyl expands and contracts like any other material. But we are talking indoor flooring here. So the temperature and humidity is going to be roughly in an acceptable range throughout the year. Plus when installing any floating floor, installers are supposed to leave some space, 1/8 to 1/4 inch at all edges where floor meets the walls. That gap allows the floor to expand or contract without bulging.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Apr 6, 2019
139 posts
26 upvotes
GTA
IndyBeak wrote: 1. If I understand correctly, under any flooring inside the house, there would be plywood sheets, so at that level all areas are same height. But as you add different materials with different thickness, there may be a height transition, could be just 1 mm, could be 1cm. You can never tell with certainly. So if you are doing vinyl throughout the floor, then it will come down to installation method. If you ripping all the current flooring out and going down to the plywood level, then the resulting floor should be same height everywhere. But this is going to cost quite a bit. If you are going to install vinyl over whatever flooring material you already have, then if you current floor is level everywhere, the new floor would be as well.
3. Yes, vinyl expands and contracts like any other material. But we are talking indoor flooring here. So the temperature and humidity is going to be roughly in an acceptable range throughout the year. Plus when installing any floating floor, installers are supposed to leave some space, 1/8 to 1/4 inch at all edges where floor meets the walls. That gap allows the floor to expand or contract without bulging.
Thank you :)

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