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[Walmart] Hamilton Beach Compact Refrigerator 3.3 cu. ft. - $97.97 (was $169.97)

  • Last Updated:
  • Aug 14th, 2019 4:37 pm
Member
Oct 14, 2007
293 posts
175 upvotes
Thedford
jochooi wrote: Anyone know if this can be used for a long roadtrip? Can it be powered through an AC adaptor and how much current will it draw ?
Probably not. You would need to use an AC inverter and the start up draw of the compressor would be 3 - 4 amps @ 120 volts which = 360 watts. Assuming no loss in the inverter, this 360 watts would = 30 amps @ 12 volts (automotive voltage). While fridge is running I am estimating about 1 amp @ 120 volts which = 120 watts. Getting this 1 amp out of an inverter would require 12 volts X 10 amps = 120 watts. Again assuming no loss through the inverter. This load would exceed the current rating of most 12 volt cigarette lighter type sockets in vehicles. If you absolutely had to do it, you would need an inverter rated to produce the start up current and pretty heavy wires (probably 8 gauge) connected to the vehicles battery.

Without the engine running the battery would be discharged pretty quickly.

Inverters are not 100 percent efficient so my numbers are on the low side. It sure would be nice if it worked though...
Deal Fanatic
Jan 12, 2017
9390 posts
2290 upvotes
Scarberia
Aspyred wrote: Do you have the same model? How is it? :)
Yes same. Bought it. Last yr at wally with 10 evoucher code 90$. Works great when itsv100% new. My compressor might be going I don't hear it much. When new u shud hear it humming
*SIG: Ryzen??? R5 2600 cpu w/ ASrock B450M OCd to 4.0ghz@1.265v stock cooler 16gb ram win10 pro w/radeon rx460 rogers Gigabit @39.99$
Member
Mar 27, 2005
328 posts
17 upvotes
darcyh wrote: Probably not. You would need to use an AC inverter and the start up draw of the compressor would be 3 - 4 amps @ 120 volts which = 360 watts. Assuming no loss in the inverter, this 360 watts would = 30 amps @ 12 volts (automotive voltage). While fridge is running I am estimating about 1 amp @ 120 volts which = 120 watts. Getting this 1 amp out of an inverter would require 12 volts X 10 amps = 120 watts. Again assuming no loss through the inverter. This load would exceed the current rating of most 12 volt cigarette lighter type sockets in vehicles. If you absolutely had to do it, you would need an inverter rated to produce the start up current and pretty heavy wires (probably 8 gauge) connected to the vehicles battery.

Without the engine running the battery would be discharged pretty quickly.

Inverters are not 100 percent efficient so my numbers are on the low side. It sure would be nice if it worked though...
Wow, thanks ! you sure know your stuff
Member
User avatar
Jul 1, 2016
361 posts
210 upvotes
Richmond Hill
ProjectPixelation wrote: Quick Edit to add more info [x2] - Added efficiency and annual KW figures for comparison.

I just returned this fridge to Walmart after trying it for 6 weeks. Note that I got this at regular price ($200 after tax).

Pros:
1) it "works" - for $200 after tax (at regular price), it was usable for the price.

Cons:
1) Due to the lack of a circulating fan, internal temps are very inconsistent. I've had the majority of items on the lower rack completely frozen, while stuff on the top are "chilled" this is at setting 6 (range from 0 - 7) - Note that 0 turns the unit off.
2) Power efficiency is terrible - uses about 80% of the electricity of my Samsung Fridge with 5.5x the capacity with a top freezer. FYI I used a P3 P3IP4400, Kill A Watt Electricity Usage Monitor to track energy usage.

Overall, warm-ish deal for $99... thought I'd share my experience so others can adjust their expectations.

Update #2:

This mini fridge uses approximately 40-50 watts when the compressor is running IIRC - Rated at 270KW annual - efficiency leaves a lot to be desired.

For reference I am using an Samsung RT18M6213SR top freezer fridge - 17.6 cubic feet - 448KW Annually (with Ice Maker), 364KW Annually (w/o Ice Maker). This fridge is 5.3x the cubic feet.

To simplify;
Hamilton Beach uses 81.81KW Annual per cubic feet VS:
Samsung 25.45 KW Annual per Cubic Feet (Ice Maker On)
Samsung 20.68 KW Annual per Cubic Feet (Ice Maker Off)
My response from the previous. thread. Thought I'd share my experience :)
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Sep 7, 2004
4688 posts
1249 upvotes
GTEH!
BillyBill wrote:
I would also recommend waiting at least 24 hours before plugging it in after delivery. Once a fridge is on its side, it needs to be upright for a while before you plug it in or else it will break it.
Curious, why do you have to wait 24hrs before plugging in (if it's been on it's side)?
😎
Sr. Member
Oct 21, 2005
597 posts
446 upvotes
Webhead wrote: Curious, why do you have to wait 24hrs before plugging in (if it's been on it's side)?
Probably the coolant needs to settle I guess. It's written on the instructions to wait 24 hours before plugging it in if it's laid on it's side. Walmart has these things laying on their side in the store so I'd be sure to leave it for a bit before starting it up either way.

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