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Scotts Turf Builder RELAXED Custom Seed Blend $7

  • Last Updated:
  • Mar 29th, 2022 10:25 am
[OP]
Member
Apr 15, 2012
313 posts
539 upvotes

[Walmart] Scotts Turf Builder RELAXED Custom Seed Blend $7

Saw this at the Coquitlam center Walmart in bc last night. Only the relaxed blend is on sale for $7. Awesome and tough are regular price at ~$18

https://stocktrack.ca/?s=wm&upc=3224712504
66 replies
Deal Fanatic
Dec 11, 2008
7162 posts
3494 upvotes
Montreal
thanks op, gonna grab a few bags today, 40 available at my store woot
Member
Aug 25, 2011
330 posts
358 upvotes
MISSISSAUGA
Can someone shed some light if it is a good product?

"approximately 80% Fine Fescue, 15% Kentucky Bluegrass, and 5% Perennial Ryegrass"
Jr. Member
Nov 13, 2018
137 posts
164 upvotes
Reviews are very bad on all the websites (Home depot, canadian tire and walmart)
Deal Addict
Sep 8, 2017
4547 posts
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GTA
bullbell wrote: Can someone shed some light if it is a good product?

"approximately 80% Fine Fescue, 15% Kentucky Bluegrass, and 5% Perennial Ryegrass"
The fine fescue in my lawn from last fall's overseeding is all dead this year because of the summer heat. The ryegrass and bluegrass are thriving. Will be avoiding fine fescue in the future. I've realized that my lawn is mostly sunny, not sun and shade.
Deal Fanatic
Dec 11, 2008
7162 posts
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Montreal
harjot89 wrote: Reviews are very bad on all the websites (Home depot, canadian tire and walmart)
Not saying they are all unreliable, but a lot of people have no idea how to seed, or are very inconsistent with watering.
Seeds are seeds, if you do things correctly, they'll germinate.
Member
Sep 4, 2015
397 posts
350 upvotes
Kitchener, ON
Madevilz wrote: Not saying they are all unreliable, but a lot of people have no idea how to seed, or are very inconsistent with watering.
Seeds are seeds, if you do things correctly, they'll germinate.
I've always had problems with grass seeds in general even with water timers running at 5 a.m. Then I tried the newspaper and burlap method I saw a neighbour using.

Now I just buy the cheapest blend I can find and I never have any issues even in the middle of summer. My grass doesn't need as much watering either.
Jr. Member
Nov 3, 2009
172 posts
144 upvotes
toronto
Madevilz wrote: Not saying they are all unreliable, but a lot of people have no idea how to seed, or are very inconsistent with watering.
Seeds are seeds, if you do things correctly, they'll germinate.
Can you tell us how to seed properly... newbie house owner here
Newbie
Jan 15, 2009
77 posts
134 upvotes
runnersgambit wrote: Can you tell us how to seed properly... newbie house owner here
LMGTFY.
Check youtube about lawn care. That will help you a lot.
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Aug 20, 2005
2680 posts
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AWESOME and TOUGH are not on sale
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Jul 5, 2011
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Bought 8 bags at my local store.. lots on the shelves.

My store had peat moss right nearby which is great because I have had a hard time finding it all year so far.

Time to dethatch, scarify, seed, top dress and water water water.
2013 Wins - $1320 - Woohoo!
Member
Jul 19, 2016
419 posts
284 upvotes
Ontario
raccoon wrote: AWESOME and TOUGH are not on sale
I guess Awesome and Tough are the better quality ones.
I have used Awesome so far, and would jump on it if it was $7!
Not sure how Relaxed is compared to it.
But if it works for someone who has used it before, then its a great deal!

Upvote for OP on the find though.
Newbie
Oct 17, 2020
62 posts
316 upvotes
runnersgambit wrote: Can you tell us how to seed properly... newbie house owner here
1) Depending on how serious you are, get a soil test. It can tell you a lot about what things are imbalanced in your soil and fixing these will make growing grass much easier

2) Wait until fall to reseed. People waste a ton of money on reseeding in the spring and wonder why it didn't work... Well here we plant cool-season grasses and these do much better with a longer run-way to grow roots in the fall. Planting in the spring means the seed doesn't have much time to grow robust root systems before getting wiped out by summer heat. Early - mid September is a good time to reseed here in SW Ontario, but adjust according to your geography/weather.

3) That means now is a good time to do your best to kill your current weeds and prep your lawn for a reseed. Most of the weed killer here in Canada is garbage and won't do much. There are ways to get your hands on good stuff from the US (e.g. Seed ranch delivers to Canada) but there are obvious ethical, environmental, and personal health implications to these products that I'm not going to get into. Weed B Gone might be your best option for legal stuff here in Canada.

4) The other thing you can get done in the late summer/early fall before your reseed is dethatching. This is the process of pulling all the dead shit out of your grass that can't prevent water and nutrients from getting to your soil/seed. There are electric or gas powered dethatchers. If you have a big lawn, well worth it to buy, rent one, or hire someone to do this for you. If you have a small lawn, you can buy a thatch rake. It's important you get a thatch rake as a normal rake won't do **** all. Just be warned that this is physically difficult and will give you some callused hands by the end.

5) The other thing you can consider is aerating. Contrary to popular belief, it's not good to do this every year. Do the screwdriver test - if you can easily sink a flat-head into your soil, you don't need to aerate. If this is difficult to do, try again after a light water. If it's still difficult to do, then aerating will be beneficial

6) As you can tell, the prep is almost as much if not more work than the seeding. Next step, mow your lawn low. This is one of the only times you SHOULD mow low. Cutting your grass down low is going to give your seeds more time to receive sunlight and water. You'll also want to bag your clippings here. This step should be done before aerating obviously

7) Next you'll likely want to put down a SMALL layer of top dressing - this is organic matter that is going to provide nutrients to your soil. More is not better.

8) I then put down some starter fertilizer. Usually this type of fertilizer has a high in phosphorus content which is going to encourage good root growth vs. high nitrogen content which you might use in the spring. Go to your local nursery... I find their products are way better and sometimes even cheaper than the hardware store crap (e.g. Scotts). Again, more is not better. Read the bag and do that math to know how much to lay down for your lawn area.

9) Seed - Do your research on what type of seed to buy and I'd encourage you to go to your local nursery to purchase. I bought some high end Rhizomatous Tall Fescue from my local nursery and it is awesome. It doesn't spread laterally as much as other grass seeds so it may be more patchy your first season you seed, but it grows deep as hell meaning that it's hardy, doesn't get overrun by weeds as much, and can tolerate drought better than other grass. You're going to want to buy a good broadcast spreader to lay your seed down. Hand held ones are not really good especially for large areas. Getting a good push one will make your life easier and ensure good/even spread. Once you've done the math on how much seed to spread based on your area, evenly spread the seed on top of the top dressing you put down.

10) After your seed is on your top dressing, gently rake it into the soil. It's totally ok if some seeds are on top still. In fact, some people even suggest not raking and leaving on top. The issue is that it may make for some very expensive bird seed. What I did last fall and had good success with was putting down 75% of my seed, raking it in, and then recasting the last 25% on top.

11) Ok, now you have top dressing, fert, and seed down. Next step: Watering
This step is where most people **** up and blame the failure on the seed. A successful overseed or reseed requires very frequent, light watering. If you have an irrigation system this will be a piece of cake. If you have a manual sprinkler, it can be a daunting task. New seed requires light watering 3-4 times a day for about 1-2 weeks, then you can scale back and start to water for longer and less frequent. It will seem absurd how much you're watering, but all of your hardwork and money is going to go down the drain (no pun intended) if you let the seedlings dry up in their infancy.

Again, there is too much of a good thing. You don't want puddles forming.

12) Monitor your growth. If you seed early enough in the fall you may even have a little more time to hit areas that didn't get much growth with seed and fill in any patches. Once your new grass has grown to 2-3 inches then hit it with the lawn mower with sharp blades. Keep mowing 1-2/times a week for the remainder of the fall.

13) Last thing I will say is that you should judge your success by next spring. It will still likely look patchy and thin in the fall although it will look a hell of a lot better than when you started. Once the spring hits, the new growth will come in much thicker and more lush if you did things properly. Then you can do all of your spring lawn care to ensure you have a kick ass summer lawn.

Hope that helps lol
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Aug 24, 2007
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xjesterxx wrote: Bought 8 bags at my local store.. lots on the shelves.

My store had peat moss right nearby which is great because I have had a hard time finding it all year so far.

Time to dethatch, scarify, seed, top dress and water water water.
A little too early for that. We're pretty much in the middle of the high heat season. Doing all that right now might severely overstress the lawn. I would wait until it's closer to middle to late August.
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Jul 5, 2011
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Toronto
Chrno wrote: A little too early for that. We're pretty much in the middle of the high heat season. Doing all that right now might severely overstress the lawn. I would wait until it's closer to middle to late August.
You're probably right.. Next week looks warm with rain in my area almost every day though and I have a good irrigation system / small area of lawn to recover. I've also got a mobile sprinkler on a timer that I can use to supplement the regular watering schedule if need be. I did manage to successfully re-grow half of my backyard after tilling the area (after scuffing it up here and there to install an irrigation system in my backyard).

Honestly my front grass is in dire shape and only about 200 sq ft .. I attribute it to my neighbors grass (connected) which is 100% weeds causing pressure, inconsistent watering from the previous sprinklers in my irrigation system (changed to rotors which I like better). Also I've never de-thatched it and have always used the mulch setting on my lawnmower... It's still probably the best lawn on my street, but I don't like it and if I can't recover it I might till it and lay sod next year after I build some kind of barrier between my lawn & my neighbors.
2013 Wins - $1320 - Woohoo!
Newbie
Oct 21, 2016
59 posts
10 upvotes
Leafsfan34 wrote: 1) Depending on how serious you are, get a soil test. It can tell you a lot about what things are imbalanced in your soil and fixing these will make growing grass much easier

2) Wait until fall to reseed. People waste a ton of money on reseeding in the spring and wonder why it didn't work... Well here we plant cool-season grasses and these do much better with a longer run-way to grow roots in the fall. Planting in the spring means the seed doesn't have much time to grow robust root systems before getting wiped out by summer heat. Early - mid September is a good time to reseed here in SW Ontario, but adjust according to your geography/weather.

3) That means now is a good time to do your best to kill your current weeds and prep your lawn for a reseed. Most of the weed killer here in Canada is garbage and won't do much. There are ways to get your hands on good stuff from the US (e.g. Seed ranch delivers to Canada) but there are obvious ethical, environmental, and personal health implications to these products that I'm not going to get into. Weed B Gone might be your best option for legal stuff here in Canada.

4) The other thing you can get done in the late summer/early fall before your reseed is dethatching. This is the process of pulling all the dead shit out of your grass that can't prevent water and nutrients from getting to your soil/seed. There are electric or gas powered dethatchers. If you have a big lawn, well worth it to buy, rent one, or hire someone to do this for you. If you have a small lawn, you can buy a thatch rake. It's important you get a thatch rake as a normal rake won't do **** all. Just be warned that this is physically difficult and will give you some callused hands by the end.

5) The other thing you can consider is aerating. Contrary to popular belief, it's not good to do this every year. Do the screwdriver test - if you can easily sink a flat-head into your soil, you don't need to aerate. If this is difficult to do, try again after a light water. If it's still difficult to do, then aerating will be beneficial

6) As you can tell, the prep is almost as much if not more work than the seeding. Next step, mow your lawn low. This is one of the only times you SHOULD mow low. Cutting your grass down low is going to give your seeds more time to receive sunlight and water. You'll also want to bag your clippings here. This step should be done before aerating obviously

7) Next you'll likely want to put down a SMALL layer of top dressing - this is organic matter that is going to provide nutrients to your soil. More is not better.

8) I then put down some starter fertilizer. Usually this type of fertilizer has a high in phosphorus content which is going to encourage good root growth vs. high nitrogen content which you might use in the spring. Go to your local nursery... I find their products are way better and sometimes even cheaper than the hardware store crap (e.g. Scotts). Again, more is not better. Read the bag and do that math to know how much to lay down for your lawn area.

9) Seed - Do your research on what type of seed to buy and I'd encourage you to go to your local nursery to purchase. I bought some high end Rhizomatous Tall Fescue from my local nursery and it is awesome. It doesn't spread laterally as much as other grass seeds so it may be more patchy your first season you seed, but it grows deep as hell meaning that it's hardy, doesn't get overrun by weeds as much, and can tolerate drought better than other grass. You're going to want to buy a good broadcast spreader to lay your seed down. Hand held ones are not really good especially for large areas. Getting a good push one will make your life easier and ensure good/even spread. Once you've done the math on how much seed to spread based on your area, evenly spread the seed on top of the top dressing you put down.

10) After your seed is on your top dressing, gently rake it into the soil. It's totally ok if some seeds are on top still. In fact, some people even suggest not raking and leaving on top. The issue is that it may make for some very expensive bird seed. What I did last fall and had good success with was putting down 75% of my seed, raking it in, and then recasting the last 25% on top.

11) Ok, now you have top dressing, fert, and seed down. Next step: Watering
This step is where most people **** up and blame the failure on the seed. A successful overseed or reseed requires very frequent, light watering. If you have an irrigation system this will be a piece of cake. If you have a manual sprinkler, it can be a daunting task. New seed requires light watering 3-4 times a day for about 1-2 weeks, then you can scale back and start to water for longer and less frequent. It will seem absurd how much you're watering, but all of your hardwork and money is going to go down the drain (no pun intended) if you let the seedlings dry up in their infancy.

Again, there is too much of a good thing. You don't want puddles forming.

12) Monitor your growth. If you seed early enough in the fall you may even have a little more time to hit areas that didn't get much growth with seed and fill in any patches. Once your new grass has grown to 2-3 inches then hit it with the lawn mower with sharp blades. Keep mowing 1-2/times a week for the remainder of the fall.

13) Last thing I will say is that you should judge your success by next spring. It will still likely look patchy and thin in the fall although it will look a hell of a lot better than when you started. Once the spring hits, the new growth will come in much thicker and more lush if you did things properly. Then you can do all of your spring lawn care to ensure you have a kick ass summer lawn.

Hope that helps lol


replying to save onto my account
Deal Addict
Sep 1, 2015
1246 posts
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harjot89 wrote: Reviews are very bad on all the websites (Home depot, canadian tire and walmart)
harjot89 wrote: Reviews are very bad on all the websites (Home depot, canadian tire and walmart)
Like someone else stated, almost every brand of seed has low reviews. Even on costco etc. It's because most don't know how to adequately use the product and then give a low review.
bullbell wrote: Thanks. Will skip then
You should be buying grass seed based on your house, lawn, sun, shade, temperature more than any random review on canadian tire. If you're in the southern tip of Ontario, what good is a review from someone in BC or Alberta which has completely different weather or growing conditions?

Based on my location, trees around my lawn, I tend to prefer sun/shade mixes. Usually actual custom grass seed can be purchased, but it does cost quite a bit, but they're the same folks who supply golf courses or professional landscaping companies. They can often give you a seed that works perfectly for where you are.

As for this Relaxed blend. It is just their basic no nonsense blend. Grows well anywhere, low maintenance, less watering. For me, in april and may I reseeded my entire front lawn with bags of Scotts Turf Builder Quick + Thick Grass Seed Sun - Shade 12-0-0. It took root quick, and is super green.

It's far too hot and dry now to seed properly. But if you have no water restrictions, or get a permit from your city, you can still grow grass. Spread properly, till somwe rows, get a roller if you can to embed, and just water constantly. 4x a day to ensure the seed stays moist and germinates. Durijg uni days, I would get up at 5am, hand water, then 11am, then 4pm, then again 8pm etc. But very hard now for people who work or aren't home.

20210722_085405.jpg
Deal Addict
Oct 8, 2009
2370 posts
1586 upvotes
Kitchener
few bags of this or the large bags of Scots seeds from costco?

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