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Water in basement -- HELP!!!!

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  • Dec 16th, 2019 2:55 pm
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Deal Addict
Nov 12, 2003
1428 posts
317 upvotes
GTA

Water in basement -- HELP!!!!

I have quite a lot of water in the crawlspace of my basement (it's a backsplit so the crawlspace is quite large). I have already had two visits from water "restoration" companies to remove the water but it keeps coming back and they say they don't troubleshoot water leaks they just do cleanup. Who should I call to diagnose this. I know the furnace is partially to blame (humidifier or condenser) because when I turned it off the water flow was significantly lower but has not stopped altogether. Do I call a plumber for this or an engineer or one of the water proofing companies? We have been without heat for 2 days and it is getting colder now so I want to figure this out and I would like to stop the water before it gets into the living area of the basement. I don't even know if they will be able to do anything if it is winter. Someone please help!!!!!
6 replies
Deal Fanatic
Aug 29, 2011
6093 posts
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Mississauga
How much water? Sewage or ground/runoff? Coming up from the ground or through the foundation wall? Any cracks?

We need more info, especially your location to give any kind of useful feedback.
Member
Mar 26, 2012
372 posts
228 upvotes
If I were you, before u call a plumber or water proofing contractor, u should take a light to see where the water coming from in the basement. It may not be a burst water pipe if you are heating your house OK. It is likely from a cracked foundation wall with poor outside drainage from downspouts too close to the basement walls or from poor soil grading outside. Go outside and check,and u may temporarily solve the problem by extending the downspouts from the foundation walls, or by pouring a few bags of soil + a tarp to improve the grading.

7 COMMON CAUSES OF WATER IN A BASEMENT OR CRAWLSPACE
https://newcombandcompany.com/resources ... rawlspace/

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Deal Expert
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Feb 11, 2007
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Oakville
Turn your heat on and call a plumber. Some cities will come for free and not charge you if the clog isn't due to you, ie tree roots.
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Oct 19, 2008
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cofh wrote: ↑I know the furnace is partially to blame (humidifier or condenser) because when I turned it off the water flow was significantly lower but has not stopped altogether.
We have been without heat for 2 days and it is getting colder now so I want to figure this out.
I answered your post in plumbing thread:
Start by disconnecting the humidifier if its drain hose is running into the crawl space and not connected to a drain. You can run the furnace without humidifier till this is fixed. Could even be furnace room floor drain is dumping water into the crawl space. So from above all looks good, humidifier discharge drain runs into floor drain as does condensate pump....but below the floor drain is uncoupled or never was attached to a drain pipe. A good hvac guy could help but it sounds more likely a plumber is required.
So all the "water restoration companies" did was put a utility pump in the crawl space for 20 minutes?
Deal Guru
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Oct 6, 2010
14438 posts
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Toronto
like how much water are we talking about here? so vague.
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Oct 9, 2010
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Windsor
You would likely call a plumber, since you've figured out that the water is at least partially coming from inside your home (if not all of it, from a source you haven't found yet). It seems reasonably certain a plumber would be able to fix this permanently pretty quickly, or at least a stop-gap solution until further work can be done.

Once the plumber figures out why a humidifier is flooding your house (this should be essentially impossible, so something is very wrong here), and potentially solves whatever other issues you might be having (maybe your washing machine is using whatever drain your humidifier was using, for example, or a washbasin ... etc), they can then likely guide you to whatever other contractor you need next. Generally, a plumber is the go-to-person for professional water-issue resolution.

Also, unless your furnace is physically being flooded (aka: will not turn on), it will function normally without water going to the humidifier (you should be able to turn it off, actually, or just let it run without water). Not sure how you're currently heating your home without a furnace, but don't use your oven to try and heat your home (not saying you're doing this, but it's going to get cold very soon).
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