Expired Hot Deals

WD Green SSD 1TB @ $119.99

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  • Aug 3rd, 2020 12:28 am
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WD Green SSD 1TB @ $119.99

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Price:
119.99
For those looking for cheap-ish SSD storage, this isn't bad. I wouldn't use is as an OS drive but should be fine as a secondary storage drive for games and media; basically things that won't need to do a lot of writing.

EDIT: Originally, this post was for the Amazon.ca deal for $129.99 on July 22, 2020 but now it's dropped to $124.99 at Memory Express.

EDIT: Now Amazon and Newegg both have dropped to $119.99 except Newegg will charge $7.99 shipping from the US.

https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B07NNRTTCM
https://www.newegg.ca/western-digital-1 ... 001A-00120

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Last edited by Haz on Aug 3rd, 2020 12:27 am, edited 2 times in total.
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This is a very low end drive. TLC but DRAM-less. Seems to use an unknown Phison controller with very poor performance, even compared to most cheap SSDs. Might even be a controller that is designed for USB flash drives.
Last edited by Jep4444 on Jul 23rd, 2020 3:04 am, edited 1 time in total.
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If WD could put SMR in this they would.
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I don't understand the point of marketing Green drives.
Green HDD's were all about lower power and cool temps compared against the competition.
Green SSD's consume 80mW of power, which is a lot more than others, such as Samsung's 860 EVO series which is rated at 50 mW.

I wonder if this has any downsides like the Green HDD head parking issues?
Maybe they'll release software that you'll have to run on the drive before you install it to fix the problem and which will blow away your data if you forgot to run it before using the drive.
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Canuck_TO wrote: I don't understand the point of marketing Green drives.
Green HDD's were all about lower power and cool temps compared against the competition.
Green SSD's consume 80mW of power, which is a lot more than others, such as Samsung's 860 EVO series which is rated at 50 mW.

I wonder if this has any downsides like the Green HDD head parking issues?
Maybe they'll release software that you'll have to run on the drive before you install it to fix the problem and which will blow away your data if you forgot to run it before using the drive.
[...]

I believe the term is Greenwashing :)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greenwashing
Last edited by Mars2012 on Jul 23rd, 2020 4:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: quote removed
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There is nothing green (ie environmentally friendly) about this drive. WD simply uses color coding.

Understanding SLC cache is of great benefit to know what you need however. SLC caching was brought into TLC and now QLC SSDs because optimum performance wasn't possible through straight flash as it was in SLC and MLC. So... they put a small SLC chip inside NAND chips and it gets used like a... highway of sorts... to speed up the transfer speed of data. The thing to remember is that, when moving large amounts of data, you are going to run into a roadblock where your transfer speeds drop drastically to around 110MB/s. I am mentioning this because I had a friend call me about this a few days ago and i realized that many don't really understand this.

When you see the feature SLC caching such as "SLC (single-level cell) caching boosts write performance to quickly perform everyday tasks"...know that it is simply a great sales job and not a feature at all. SLC caching is in all QLC and most TLC memory. Without it, the advertised performance could never be what it is; it would be much lower.
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flamenko wrote: There is nothing green (ie environmentally friendly) about this drive. WD simply uses color coding.

Understanding SLC cache is of great benefit to know what you need however. SLC caching was brought into TLC and now QLC SSDs because optimum performance wasn't possible through straight flash as it was in SLC and MLC. So... they put a small SLC chip inside NAND chips and it gets used like a... highway of sorts... to speed up the transfer speed of data. The thing to remember is that, when moving large amounts of data, you are going to run into a roadblock where your transfer speeds drop drastically to around 110MB/s. I am mentioning this because I had a friend call me about this a few days ago and i realized that many don't really understand this.

When you see the feature SLC caching such as "SLC (single-level cell) caching boosts write performance to quickly perform everyday tasks"...know that it is simply a great sales job and not a feature at all. SLC caching is in all QLC and most TLC memory. Without it, the advertised performance could never be what it is; it would be much lower.
Oh, interesting. I just assumed the 'green series' carried over from the disk drive days where if I remember right, it was a lower rpm drive that would either last longer and/or use less power in exchange for lower non-sequential I/O throughput.
Perhaps the series now just represents a lower cost per gb maybe, I have not been paying attention to the new tech options now.
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When it comes under 100$ I’ll buy to make it storage drive
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At $130 for this green drive, I don't disagree with some of you but it's for those looking for a large read-mostly SSD and are penny pinching, it's not horrible.
Amourek wrote: ADATA SU800 is a much better drive and only $10 more.
This is what I'm running as my storage drive on my gaming rig. I keep getting tempted to grab another to use as secondary storage in my gaming laptop but it pains me to have to pay $40 more.
Canuck_TO wrote: I don't understand the point of marketing Green drives.
Green HDD's were all about lower power and cool temps compared against the competition.
Green SSD's consume 80mW of power, which is a lot more than others, such as Samsung's 860 EVO series which is rated at 50 mW.

I wonder if this has any downsides like the Green HDD head parking issues?
Maybe they'll release software that you'll have to run on the drive before you install it to fix the problem and which will blow away your data if you forgot to run it before using the drive.
Same joke?
amazon-ca-wd-green-ssd-sata-1tb-139-99- ... #p32620517
R.I.P. Rick Rypien #37

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meh, if it's faster than hdd...i'm happy!
PenguinNinja007 wrote: Someone mentioned above but that drive is QVO, no DRAM. Slow copy speeds if doing over ~6GB.

assuming the drive is not near capacity
<6GB = ~500+ MB/s
>6GB = ~100 MB/s

WOULD SOMEBODY THINK OF THE CHILDREN!!!
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flamenko wrote: There is nothing green (ie environmentally friendly) about this drive. WD simply uses color coding.

Understanding SLC cache is of great benefit to know what you need however. SLC caching was brought into TLC and now QLC SSDs because optimum performance wasn't possible through straight flash as it was in SLC and MLC. So... they put a small SLC chip inside NAND chips and it gets used like a... highway of sorts... to speed up the transfer speed of data. The thing to remember is that, when moving large amounts of data, you are going to run into a roadblock where your transfer speeds drop drastically to around 110MB/s. I am mentioning this because I had a friend call me about this a few days ago and i realized that many don't really understand this.

When you see the feature SLC caching such as "SLC (single-level cell) caching boosts write performance to quickly perform everyday tasks"...know that it is simply a great sales job and not a feature at all. SLC caching is in all QLC and most TLC memory. Without it, the advertised performance could never be what it is; it would be much lower.
I just want to clarify some things for those reading this. SLC caching only really applied to NVMe and QLC drives. Direct to TLC write speeds easily exceed SATA in all but the cheapest SSDs. This drive is just slow period, it's own controller is too slow for SLC caching to even save it.

The 110MB/s speeds are actually a direct drawback of dynamic SLC caching. I assume you're referring the P1/660p in this scenario? Since they're known for plummeting to those numbers. The direct to QLC speed is higher than 110MB/s. The problem is they don't even have a small SLC NAND chip on board, they're just use their own QLC NAND as an SLC cache. This is fine until the drive straight up gets full, because it reserved most of it's free space as a SLC cache, and now needs to simultaneously fold SLC back to QLC while still writing. That's when we see it plummet down to HDD level speeds. Same thing that goes on in the SX8200 Pro, though that drive still performs much better because it can fold from SLC to TLC much quicker than those can fold from SLC to QLC. For most people, they rarely write enough to actually trigger this, unless the drive is basically full. What did your friend do that triggered that scenario anyways?
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Canuck_TO wrote: I don't understand the point of marketing Green drives.
Green HDD's were all about lower power and cool temps compared against the competition.
Green SSD's consume 80mW of power, which is a lot more than others, such as Samsung's 860 EVO series which is rated at 50 mW.

I wonder if this has any downsides like the Green HDD head parking issues?
Maybe they'll release software that you'll have to run on the drive before you install it to fix the problem and which will blow away your data if you forgot to run it before using the drive.
There is no head on an SSD so no there is no head parking issues Face With Tears Of Joy.
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Well no actually, it applies to TLC used in many SATA 3 drives as well...such as Silicon Power S55 or Seagate Barracuda. And no. I can show a drop in just about every SLC cache SSD. I think you are speaking of DRAM which I am not. There is an SLC cache within the QLC NAND package. This is a good paper... https://www.usenix.org/system/files/hot ... er_yoo.pdf where it is explained. "In order to hide the slow performance of QLC flash memory, most recent QLC-based SSDs adopt a hybrid SSD architecture which has a partitioned SLC region."

This is also a great article that speaks directly to TLC. https://www.atpinc.com/blog/what-is-SLC ... -SLC-cache

Most manufacturers are overcoming this drop through very large DRAM chips...Sabrent for example. Monster DRAM.

If I am wrong, I will apologize in advance and look forward to a better explanation. My initial was only a very basic explanation as I would probably lose everyone going right into tech descriptions.
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flamenko wrote: Well no actually, it applies to TLC used in many SATA 3 drives as well...such as Silicon Power S55 or Seagate Barracuda.
Those are some of the cheapest SSD drives but I'll concede that one lol.
And no. I can show a drop in just about every SLC cache SSD.
Ya I just brought up the P1/660p since they're frequently quoted hitting speeds like that. Though I dug a bit further and it appears to be most QLC drives in that general ballpark. Though the 4TB QVO can punch out 160MB/s in direct to QLC speeds lol.
I think you are speaking of DRAM which I am not. There is an SLC cache within the QLC NAND package. This is a good paper... https://www.usenix.org/system/files/hot ... er_yoo.pdf where it is explained. "In order to hide the slow performance of QLC flash memory, most recent QLC-based SSDs adopt a hybrid SSD architecture which has a partitioned SLC region."

Most manufacturers are overcoming this drop through very large DRAM chips...Sabrent for example. Monster DRAM.

If I am wrong, I will apologize in advance and look forward to a better explanation. My initial was only a very basic explanation as I would probably lose everyone going right into tech descriptions.
I was actually quoting a slightly different problem but it turns out I was relying a bit too much on memory and assumed it applied to those drives but I don't see evidence, at least in capacities that I can find benches for that it does. Though the P1/660p do treat their own QLC NAND as a SLC cache, either it's using the entire free space as a cache (I don't believe that to be the case on those particular models) or the direct to QLC speeds are so poor that it doesn't matter. I wish I could find benches of the 2TB 660p doing the same test but I can't. The SX8200 Pro definitely has that problem though, you can see it in the full drive benches https://www.anandtech.com/show/13759/co ... hp-ex950/2. You actually see two performance cliffs, not one. The first one is the drive running out of what is a very large cache, which is what you're referring too. The second is actually the drive ran out of space and needs to fold the massive cache back to TLC, weird stuff indeed.
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Jep4444 wrote: Those are some of the cheapest SSD drives but I'll concede that one lol.



Ya I just brought up the P1/660p since they're frequently quoted hitting speeds like that. Though I dug a bit further and it appears to be most QLC drives in that general ballpark. Though the 4TB QVO can punch out 160MB/s in direct to QLC speeds lol.

EDIT. Ok... QLC first gen when it was brought to us was thrown back to the manufacturers as garbage. We told them (including Samsung) that it would not sell in today's environment and that each generation would have to AT LEAST stand up to the last gen in performance. Their return is SLC caching which literally fools people. Thats why I was so SHOCKED that nobody wanted those four 960 Pro's I sold. I think I let each go for $130 when the market price right noe was $400.


I was actually quoting a slightly different problem but it turns out I was relying a bit too much on memory and assumed it applied to those drives but I don't see evidence, at least in capacities that I can find benches for that it does. Though the P1/660p do treat their own QLC NAND as a SLC cache, either it's using the entire free space as a cache (I don't believe that to be the case on those particular models) or the direct to QLC speeds are so poor that it doesn't matter. I wish I could find benches of the 2TB 660p doing the same test but I can't. The SX8200 Pro definitely has that problem though, you can see it in the full drive benches https://www.anandtech.com/show/13759/co ... hp-ex950/2. You actually see two performance cliffs, not one. The first one is the drive running out of what is a very large cache, which is what you're referring too. The second is actually the drive ran out of space and needs to fold the massive cache back to TLC, weird stuff indeed.
Meant to get this in before your answer but I just did a QLC and a TLC, both premium drives...
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