Travel

Westjet now providing refunds for cancelled trips

  • Last Updated:
  • Oct 22nd, 2020 9:10 am
Sr. Member
Aug 17, 2008
959 posts
766 upvotes
Toronto
wewlad wrote: What number did you call?
Call who ever you booked the tickets with. In my case I called scotia-travel.
AFAIK - only flights to the UK/USA
The Golden Rule: those who have the gold, make the rules
Newbie
Jan 4, 2019
14 posts
8 upvotes
Okay so my dates to call are the same as yours, July 16th, I called Westjet right now, and they said they couldn't process it until its my dates, so July 16th
Newbie
Sep 24, 2017
33 posts
16 upvotes
Called RBC Travel this morning. I have a family vacation booked to LA Aug 7 - 19. Flight was entirely booked on points except taxes.

RBC said that Westjet is allowing refunds for my itinerary, but they are only doing it up to flights booked to Aug 4. They said to wait until a bit closer to the date.

Funny thing is that my flight isn't cancelled, just modified to hell. It was a direct flight to LA, but now it's through Calgary on the way there and Vancouver on the way back, with ridiculous hours and layover, including landing back home in Toronto a day later?!? Neither RBC nor Westjet even sent me a notice about the itinerary changes. Hopefully will get my money / points back and be done with it.
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May 10, 2005
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QballDS wrote: Called RBC Travel this morning. I have a family vacation booked to LA Aug 7 - 19. Flight was entirely booked on points except taxes.

RBC said that Westjet is allowing refunds for my itinerary, but they are only doing it up to flights booked to Aug 4. They said to wait until a bit closer to the date.

Funny thing is that my flight isn't cancelled, just modified to hell. It was a direct flight to LA, but now it's through Calgary on the way there and Vancouver on the way back, with ridiculous hours and layover, including landing back home in Toronto a day later?!? Neither RBC nor Westjet even sent me a notice about the itinerary changes. Hopefully will get my money / points back and be done with it.
They are allowed to change the schedule. Sucks but, it is within their T&C's.
The Government cannot give to anybody anything that the Government does not first take from somebody else.
Sr. Member
Jul 13, 2007
974 posts
506 upvotes
Toronto
Pete_Coach wrote: They are allowed to change the schedule. Sucks but, it is within their T&C's.
Flights to/from LA will be covered by DOT. They shouldn't stall on refund requests when they make significant schedule changes. Complain to US DOT. You'll probably get your money back before the complaint is finalized, but the complaint will still be held against them, as it should.

From https://www.transportation.gov/sites/do ... 202020.pdf :
Carriers have a longstanding obligation to provide a prompt refund to a ticketed passenger when the carrier cancels the passenger’s flight or makes a significant change in the flight schedule and the passenger chooses not to accept the alternative offered by the carrier.
See Enhancing Airline Passenger Protections, 76 Fed. Reg. 23110-01, at 23129 (Apr. 25, 2011) (“We reject . . .
assertions that carriers are not required to refund a passenger's fare when a flight is cancelled if the carrier can
accommodate the passenger with other transportation options after the cancellation. We find it to be manifestly unfair
for a carrier to fail to provide the transportation contracted for and then to refuse to provide a refund if the passenger
finds the offered rerouting unacceptable (e.g., greatly delayed or otherwise inconvenient) and he or she no longer wishes
to travel.”)
Adding YVR to an LAX-YYZ journey makes it 50% longer in airtime alone: http://www.gcmap.com/mapui?P=lax-yvr-yyz,+lax-yyz

That's significant imo.
Sr. Member
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Jul 30, 2015
649 posts
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I must agree; that change really does suck (and makes no sense from a pax point of view) I would cancel as well...
Never argue with stupid people, they will drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience.
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May 10, 2005
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HammerRFDer wrote: Flights to/from LA will be covered by DOT. They shouldn't stall on refund requests when they make significant schedule changes. Complain to US DOT. You'll probably get your money back before the complaint is finalized, but the complaint will still be held against them, as it should.

From https://www.transportation.gov/sites/do ... 202020.pdf :




Adding YVR to an LAX-YYZ journey makes it 50% longer in airtime alone: http://www.gcmap.com/mapui?P=lax-yvr-yyz,+lax-yyz

That's significant imo.
What is significant is that even the OP indicated the flight was not cancelled. He stated "Funny thing is that my flight isn't cancelled, just modified to hell."

You also failed to include the following form your link :
"Specifically, the Aviation Enforcement Office will refrain from pursuing an enforcement action against a carrier that provided passengers vouchers for future travel in lieu of refunds for cancelled or significantly delayed flights during the COVID-19 public health emergency"
The Government cannot give to anybody anything that the Government does not first take from somebody else.
Sr. Member
Jul 13, 2007
974 posts
506 upvotes
Toronto
Pete_Coach wrote: What is significant is that even the OP indicated the flight was not cancelled. He stated "Funny thing is that my flight isn't cancelled, just modified to hell."

You also failed to include the following form your link :
"Specifically, the Aviation Enforcement Office will refrain from pursuing an enforcement action against a carrier that provided passengers vouchers for future travel in lieu of refunds for cancelled or significantly delayed flights during the COVID-19 public health emergency"
There are 3 requirements for your exemption, and you only quoted the first prong.

The second requirement is: “ ; (2) the carrier updates its refund policies and contract of carriage provisions to make clear that it provides refunds to passengers if the carrier cancels a flight or makes a significant schedule change; ”

In other words, a voucher is an option, but you can still get your refund. Just means the airline won’t get in shit if they give you a voucher and you didn’t ask for a refund.

My first quote states “cancels the passenger’s flight or makes a significant change”, the second quote mentions significant rerouting that the passenger finds unacceptable. So why only focus on the airline not cancelling when they made a significant change/rerouting?

And why are you bringing up vouchers when they were never offered?

But okay, don’t admit that your claim of “ They are allowed to change the schedule. Sucks but, it is within their T&C's.” isn’t true: you don’t have to accept their schedule changes. The law and regulators trump what’s in the T&C. Always.
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May 10, 2005
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HammerRFDer wrote: There are 3 requirements for your exemption, and you only quoted the first prong.

The second requirement is: “ ; (2) the carrier updates its refund policies and contract of carriage provisions to make clear that it provides refunds to passengers if the carrier cancels a flight or makes a significant schedule change; ”

In other words, a voucher is an option, but you can still get your refund. Just means the airline won’t get in shit if they give you a voucher and you didn’t ask for a refund.

My first quote states “cancels the passenger’s flight or makes a significant change”, the second quote mentions significant rerouting that the passenger finds unacceptable. So why only focus on the airline not cancelling when they made a significant change/rerouting?

And why are you bringing up vouchers when they were never offered?

But okay, don’t admit that your claim of “ They are allowed to change the schedule. Sucks but, it is within their T&C's.” isn’t true: you don’t have to accept their schedule changes. The law and regulators trump what’s in the T&C. Always.
Yes, there are 3 but, that does not mean all 3 need to be in combination. Any one is sufficient.
Voucher is in the text, no my words.

Yes, schedule changes are allowed. Read:
https://www.westjet.com/en-ca/travel-in ... ns-changes and
https://www.westjet.com/en-ca/travel-in ... ns-changes


T& C's are the contact you signed and agreed upon when you bought the tickets so, that is what is the trump card.

And lastly, what he can get depends on his fare and whether or not he cancelled.
The Government cannot give to anybody anything that the Government does not first take from somebody else.
Member
Aug 31, 2012
490 posts
149 upvotes
Toronto
I will never book with Westjet again. They challenged my AMEX chargeback for YVR-YYZ flights that they cancelled. I don’t want a flight credit from them as they don’t fly anywhere I am remotely interested in going within the next year. All Canadian airlines will be last resort only.
Sr. Member
Jul 13, 2007
974 posts
506 upvotes
Toronto
Pete_Coach wrote: Yes, there are 3 but, that does not mean all 3 need to be in combination. Any one is sufficient.
Voucher is in the text, no my words.
Yes, all 3 are in combination, as there is an “and” just before the third. Read the whole thing together, don’t pick and choose quotes out of context.

T& C's are the contact you signed and agreed upon when you bought the tickets so, that is what is the trump card.
The regulators would like a word with you. You cannot consent away your legal rights. Regulators, even the lame Canadian aviation ones, regularly overturn T&Cs. Lots of the legal gobbly-gook people sign are unenforceable.
And lastly, what he can get depends on his fare and whether or not he cancelled.
Clearly the regulator treats significant route changes as equivalent to cancellations. My link even says you can be eligible for refunds on non-refundable tickets:
“applying . . . nonrefundability/penalty provisions in situations in which the change of flight time or travel date has been necessitated by carrier action or ‘an act of god’, e.g., where the carrier cancels a flight for weather or mechanical reasons . . . is grossly unfair and it violates 49 U.S.C. 41712, as would any contract of carriage or tariff provision mandating such a result” and putting carriers on notice that the Department “will aggressively pursue any cases of this type that come to our attention”).
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May 10, 2005
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HammerRFDer wrote: Yes, all 3 are in combination, as there is an “and” just before the third. Read the whole thing together, don’t pick and choose quotes.



The regulators would like a word with you. You cannot consent away your legal rights. Regulators, even the lame Canadian aviation ones, regularly overturn T&Cs. Lots of the legal gobbly-gook people sign are unenforceable.


Clearly the regulator treats significant route changes as equivalent to cancellations. My link even says you can be eligible for refunds on non-refundable tickets.
You are wrong again, you made a deal based on what the T&C's are. No one is giving their rights away, you are signing a deal and agreeing to those specific terms. I am sure the airlines lawyers have been all over the T&C's and they are all legal and binding.

You are clearly forgetting what you give up and what the penalties are when you make the cancellation regardless of the reason. You cancelled. That is very much the key here. You cancel and you lose a lot....depending on the fare you paid.

If I have not said it enough....he cancelled. No amount or regulations are going to help. It was his decision. He may not have liked the revised schedule but it was still a schedule and was going to get him to his destination. So, in the end, he cancelled, not the airline and the rules are in the links I provided.
The Government cannot give to anybody anything that the Government does not first take from somebody else.
Sr. Member
Jul 13, 2007
974 posts
506 upvotes
Toronto
Pete_Coach wrote: You are wrong again, you made a deal based on what the T&C's are. No one is giving their rights away, you are signing a deal and agreeing to those specific terms. I am sure the airlines lawyers have been all over the T&C's and they are all legal and binding.

You are clearly forgetting what you give up and what the penalties are when you make the cancellation regardless of the reason. You cancelled. That is very much the key here. You cancel and you lose a lot....depending on the fare you paid.

If I have not said it enough....he cancelled. No amount or regulations are going to help. It was his decision. He may not have liked the revised schedule but it was still a schedule and was going to get him to his destination. So, in the end, he cancelled, not the airline and the rules are in the links I provided.
Do you even read others’ posts? Or just dole out advice based on what you think/hope/dream is true?

Like, I’ve told you that regulators overturn tariffs/T&Cs all the time, and you’ve continued to go on about how there was an agreement so you’re SOL. Airline lawyers love to sneak in all kinds of crap into contracts because they hope people will do exactly what you’re saying: not understand that unlawful terms or unreasonable terms subject the airline to regulatory/enforcement action. Their lawyers work for the airline, not for you.

And I’ve provided direct quotes from regulators showing that the pax has the same rights in a significant re-routing as they do if the airline cancelled. It doesn’t matter if he wants to cancel, because the airline did the equivalent of cancelling first.

My advice to others: ignore Pete_Coach’s (bad) advice on this (and possibly other) subject(s).
Deal Expert
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May 10, 2005
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HammerRFDer wrote: Do you even read others’ posts? Or just dole out advice based on what you think/hope/dream is true?

Like, I’ve told you that regulators overturn tariffs/T&Cs all the time, and you’ve continued to go on about how there was an agreement so you’re SOL. Airline lawyers love to sneak in all kinds of crap into contracts because they hope people will do exactly what you’re saying: not understand that unlawful terms or unreasonable terms subject the airline to regulatory/enforcement action. Their lawyers work for the airline, not for you.

And I’ve provided direct quotes from regulators showing that the pax has the same rights in a significant re-routing as they do if the airline cancelled. It doesn’t matter if he wants to cancel, because the airline did the equivalent of cancelling first.

I read posts all the time, not just here but on other travel sites as well.
I am continually reading about people not getting any money back. The common denominator is that airlines are not (or very rarely and to passengers that have purchased full fare tickets form the airline directly) giving refunds. They are offering vouchers to those passengers that have had their flights cancelled.
I have linked information from regulators that indicate they are not perusing action as a result of COVID.
I have shown you links that clearly state that if you cancel the flights, for whatever reason, you get nothing back or, if the airline is willing, may give vouchers or credit.
I have shown links that show the entitlements for the various fares that are purchased if the airlines cancels the flights.

You have posted links that are not applicable, that your posts are hopeful at best but, not in any way, applicable to all travelers. Your assumption that everyone is the same and is entitled to full refunds is not only incorrect, it is absurd. That is very evident in the numerous threads on RFD and on other travel sites full of complaints about not getting refunds

As for the OP, the airline did not cancel, it modified the scheduled and gave him appropriate as required notice. Over and done. He canceled it. Over and done. You cannot spin it any other way. The airline, because he used points to get his flights may (and it is not certain) give them the points back.


FYI.....Here is Wesjet policy :
Cancellations outside of 24 hours of booking: After the 24 hour period, cancellations will be charged as follows:

Basic fares: these fares will not be refunded to you in the original form of payment when cancelled more than 24 hours after booking and the funds will not be returned to you in the form of a travel credit.
Econo, Premium, Business and Member Exclusive fares (travel to or from all destinations in North America including Mexico, the Caribbean and Central America): These fares will not be refunded to you in the original form of payment when cancelled more than 24 hours after booking or for same- day bookings. Rather, after the cancellation fee of $100 CAD/USD (plus tax, per person per fare component) has been charged, the remaining funds will be returned to you in the form of a travel credit.
EconoFlex fares (travel within Canada): These fares will not be refunded to you in the original form of payment when cancelled more than 24 hours after booking or for same- day bookings. Rather, the remaining funds will be returned to you in the form of a travel credit. There is no cancellation fee.
EconoFlex fares (travel to or from all destinations in North America including Mexico, the Caribbean and Central America, but excluding travel within Canada): These fares will not be refunded to you in the original form of payment when cancelled more than 24 hours after booking or for same- day bookings. Rather, after the cancellation fee of $100 CAD/USD (plus tax, per person per fare component) has been charged, the remaining funds will be returned to you in the form of a travel credit.
Econo, EconoFlex, Premium and Member Exclusive fares (travel to or from destinations outside of North America): These fares will not be refunded to you in the original form of payment when cancelled more than 24 hours after booking or for same- day bookings. Rather, after the cancellation fee of $250 CAD/USD (plus tax, per person) has been charged, the remaining funds will be returned to you in the form of a travel credit.
Business fares (travel to or from destinations outside of North America): These fares will not be refunded to you in the original form of payment when cancelled more than 24 hours after booking or for same- day bookings. Rather, after the cancellation fee of $600 CAD/USD (plus tax, per person) has been charged, the remaining funds will be returned to you in the form of a travel credit.
PremiumFlexand BusinessFlex fare: There is no cancellation fee for these fares. Funds will be refunded to you in the original form of payment.

Some promotional fares may have additional fare rules. These will be specified at the time of booking. Please consult your booking confirmation for more information.

https://www.westjet.com/en-ca/about-us/ ... et-flights

My advice to others: Ignore HammerRFDer wishful thinking and incorrect information. Read your T&C's and tariff to be sure of your entitlement. American relations carry little, if any weight here in Canada
The Government cannot give to anybody anything that the Government does not first take from somebody else.
Sr. Member
Jul 13, 2007
974 posts
506 upvotes
Toronto
Pete_Coach wrote: Stuff
You say they gave him appropriate notice, but qballDS said: “ Neither RBC nor Westjet even sent me a notice about the itinerary changes.”.

Are we reading the same posts?

American regulations *absolutely* matter on flights to/from USA. Unless the airline wants to pull out of US flights entirely, forever, they will answer to the US regulator and US law.

That’s why people are getting their money back very quickly once they file a US DOT complaint when valid (e.g. significant reroutings/schedule changes).

BTW: if you’re going to go all T&C on someone, quote the tariff, not their interpretation from their website.

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