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Wet Basement -- Isn't PVC better than Corrugated Sleeved Piping?

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  • Sep 27th, 2021 1:05 pm
[OP]
Sr. Member
Apr 29, 2010
984 posts
93 upvotes
London

Wet Basement -- Isn't PVC better than Corrugated Sleeved Piping?

I still haven't addressed my old home's wet basement issue. An interior wet basement solution is my only option. The quote from RCC Waterproofing seems fine (~ $77 per lf) but they appear to be placing flexible corrugated piping (with a sock around it) at the bottom of the footing.

Won't corrugated piping impede water flow due to the ridges? I can also visualize debris easily building up and damming the water. Furthermore, i don't understand how this sock wont get all plugged up around the circumference from the fine silt which flow through the angular rocks thereby reducing the uptake of water over the years.

Am i mistaken? Has this approach proven reliable over ther decades? I mean, perforated schedule 10/40 PVC seems the better option, no? No sleeves, easier to establish pitch, smooth interior, easy clean-out.
9 replies
Deal Guru
Jan 25, 2007
11450 posts
6634 upvotes
Paris
The corrugated pipe with sock is the standard for outside around foundations last I checked.
Deal Addict
Jun 26, 2019
1885 posts
1601 upvotes
GTA
rosario99 wrote: Am i mistaken? Has this approach proven reliable over ther decades? I mean, perforated schedule 10/40 PVC seems the better option, no? No sleeves, easier to establish pitch, smooth interior, easy clean-out.
Yes, its the standard. Yes, its been used for decades. Yes, it is the go to method for basically any foundation drainage system.

The filter fabric does a pretty good job, sure if you have some kind of super fine silt, it may clog it up a bit, but for these kinds of systems you usually dont get much sediment after the first few years, but really you shouldnt be getting much of that at all, especially if its on the interior. If you're adding cleanouts then one system may be better than the other, but usually cleanouts are never installed on foundation drainage systems.

Next up comparing decreases in flow due to ridges can generally be ignored for this application. In most cases, such as these, the pipes will be installed pretty much flat and therefore they usually dont come close to attaining self cleaning velocity.

Lastly, most perforated PVC pipe is kinda lacking in the perforation department. If you were concerned about the ridges and silting up, I would be more concerned about the bottom hole on the perforated pvc pipe clogging up.

Then again, this is all basic assumptions, if for some reason you have crap tons of super fines in your water for some reason, which would likely cause other issues, then maybe a more complicated system is in order.
Deal Addict
Apr 26, 2003
2106 posts
1144 upvotes
GTA
Why is the interior option the only option? Stopping the water from penetrating the wall from outside is better than mitigating it after it enters.

I did the exterior option last year and it made quite a mess with the trench they dug around the house, but it's the "proper" way to do it if you can.
Deal Guru
Jan 25, 2007
11450 posts
6634 upvotes
Paris
exrcoupe wrote: Why is the interior option the only option? Stopping the water from penetrating the wall from outside is better than mitigating it after it enters.

I did the exterior option last year and it made quite a mess with the trench they dug around the house, but it's the "proper" way to do it if you can.
I have seen it done both ways, and the interior option is valid for sure. My aunt did it, my buddy did it, and we are doing a buddies house next summer.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Apr 29, 2010
984 posts
93 upvotes
London
We have 2 basements beneath our home -- the areas are separated by a block wall. One side is about 95 linear feet and the other about 75 linear feet. The quote i received says they'll run the drainage along the interior perimeter then have a connection beneath the separating wall to the other side. It all connects to a single existing sump pump on the opposite end of the house.

Can this all be pitched correctly or is pitching even done with corrugated piping? Furthermore, given the distance and 2 separate regions is having 1 sump pump on the opposite end of the house appropriate?
Sr. Member
Dec 26, 2012
508 posts
389 upvotes
Hamilton
exrcoupe wrote: Why is the interior option the only option? Stopping the water from penetrating the wall from outside is better than mitigating it after it enters.

I did the exterior option last year and it made quite a mess with the trench they dug around the house, but it's the "proper" way to do it if you can.
depends. i got the interior system done because the homes are too close to eachother where I live. If i went the external route, we would be digging up my neighbours wall as well and i wasn't about to pay for that.
Deal Addict
Dec 19, 2009
4695 posts
2600 upvotes
After the water and/or silt fills the corrugated pipes corrugations the bottom will be nice and smooth.
The sock prevents silt from going into the pipe and possibly plugging it if enough silt goes in.
Member
Dec 21, 2020
354 posts
289 upvotes
The pipe itself should be covered with coarse gravel so not much silt there. Once the whole thing is covered there really isn't anywhere for more silt to come from in the future after the initial "wash". IF you have large amounts of silt building up then you have erosion and that is not good news for a foundation. The pipe itself isn't really meant to move the water to the sump. It will mostly just store it and let it soak up slowly into the ground under it. If there is a large enough amount of water then it will just naturally migrate over to the sump to be drained. Remember this type of plumbing isn't trying to drain away all the water to a sewer, just contain it to let it soak down slowly.
Sr. Member
Dec 26, 2012
508 posts
389 upvotes
Hamilton
Hey OP, try looking at other quotes. i wasn't really happy with my RCC quote and went with OMNI basement solutions. They use some slightly different materials. they're all proprietary to them so there may be some fancy marketing involved to make a interior waterproofing system sound fancy but i suppose that's to be expected. regardless, it's a very similar system to what you just had installed. i had 5 or 6 quotes and RCC came in the priciest and OMNI came in around the middle but it was good to get different perspectives regardless.

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