Computers & Electronics

What are the disadvantages of using a laptop as a desktop?

  • Last Updated:
  • May 17th, 2019 6:08 pm
[OP]
Member
Feb 13, 2019
312 posts
158 upvotes

What are the disadvantages of using a laptop as a desktop?

Are there any significant disadvantages?
39 replies
Deal Fanatic
Feb 4, 2015
6414 posts
2815 upvotes
Canada, Eh!!
You'll then have to carry the desktop around... to use as laptop!! :) JK

I've been using like that for years hooked up to a monitor. This was because have other laptops as well so designated one as desktop for banking, email only.

If looking to buy new computer... normally get more bang for your buck with desktop.
.......
July 13, 2017 to October 25, 2018: BOC raised rates 5 times and MCAP raised its prime rate next day each time.

2020: BOC dropped rates 3 times and MCAP waited and waited to drop its prime rate to include all 3 drops.
Deal Addict
Apr 13, 2005
1209 posts
1219 upvotes
Markham, ON
Cost (more expensive to build a laptop as powerful as its desktop counterpart)
Space considerations (you can put a desktop under your desk) while laptop has to be on the desk, occupying space.
FIDO, Freedom Mobile, Koodo, Public Mobile, TELUS customer.
Deal Addict
Jan 10, 2017
1266 posts
594 upvotes
GTA
Performance is the only time people would want to use a desktop over a laptop. Basic needs doesn't change requirements as the laptop can be docked to a desk with keyboard, mouse and monitor.
Sr. Member
Sep 13, 2011
968 posts
625 upvotes
Québec
starlamp wrote: Are there any significant disadvantages?
Only 2 dimm for ram
hard to repair, non standard parts
fixed gpu
Higher cost
easier to steel, cannot use a 'Sleeper' Desktop.
...
Last edited by elgros4 on May 9th, 2019 8:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2011
35227 posts
21211 upvotes
Center of Universe
Laptops are for mobility.
Desktops would be ideal for gamers, as you have better cooling and obviously more space for those massive GPUs.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2006
27311 posts
12995 upvotes
-Limited ports
-Limited expandability
-Limited resources (RAM, CPU, disks)
-Ports may be in the wrong location taking up more desk room
-Docking stations cost additional money
-Slower than desktops (assuming same generation etc)
[OP]
Member
Feb 13, 2019
312 posts
158 upvotes
Thanks everyone

It's just that I kitted out some desktop tiny's on the Lenovo site and they became quite expensive. And with the 30% off Thinkpad deal some of them seem quite cheap & I was thinking maybe I could just use one laptop for both needs [I'm a home user either way] - hence the thread.

Very helpful: thanks again folks.
Deal Expert
Feb 29, 2008
25961 posts
3265 upvotes
Montreal
Desk space. You can put the tower on the floor and run two full size displays, instead of a small laptop and display on the side.
Deal Fanatic
Feb 4, 2015
6414 posts
2815 upvotes
Canada, Eh!!
I only shut down laptop used as desktop like once a week or so... more if updates.

So able to put on top of a plastic storage container that is on floor... no loss in desk space.

Close lid at night... open in morning.
.......
July 13, 2017 to October 25, 2018: BOC raised rates 5 times and MCAP raised its prime rate next day each time.

2020: BOC dropped rates 3 times and MCAP waited and waited to drop its prime rate to include all 3 drops.
Deal Guru
User avatar
May 9, 2006
11959 posts
2463 upvotes
starlamp wrote: Thanks everyone

It's just that I kitted out some desktop tiny's on the Lenovo site and they became quite expensive. And with the 30% off Thinkpad deal some of them seem quite cheap & I was thinking maybe I could just use one laptop for both needs [I'm a home user either way] - hence the thread.

Very helpful: thanks again folks.
Just don't be fooled by Intel's naming conventions like an "i7" in a laptop and think it's the same as an i7 in a desktop PC.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Mar 23, 2008
11878 posts
8134 upvotes
Edmonton
starlamp wrote: Thanks everyone

It's just that I kitted out some desktop tiny's on the Lenovo site and they became quite expensive. And with the 30% off Thinkpad deal some of them seem quite cheap & I was thinking maybe I could just use one laptop for both needs [I'm a home user either way] - hence the thread.

Very helpful: thanks again folks.
Unlike a lot of things where bigger is better, when it comes to technology, you often pay a premium for small. As in, when configuring a laptop or “tiny” computer.

C
Sr. Member
Jan 8, 2015
800 posts
509 upvotes
If you're using constant high load CPU tasks eventually the thermal paste/compound will dry up and see higher and higher temperatures in a laptop?
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Mar 31, 2017
6729 posts
2947 upvotes
Upgrading is difficult or impossible for laptops. many laptops have soldered ram slots so upgrading ram wont be possible. Upgrading video card most laptops will not allow either. upgrading cpu likely not.

On the plus side is the portability of the laptop, and way less energy use.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2006
27311 posts
12995 upvotes
CNeufeld wrote: Unlike a lot of things where bigger is better, when it comes to technology, you often pay a premium for small. As in, when configuring a laptop or “tiny” computer.
Did I feel this when I built my NUC.
For the price I paid, I could have built a machine that was damn near twice as powerful.
But I can literally shove my NUC in a side pocket of my suitcase.

Also to show how weird generations are, my NUC (NUC8i7HVK) even with a mobileish chipset is more powerful than the desktop I'm currently using to write this post.
It was at least decent like 5 years ago with an i5 3570k and a R9 280.
My damn NUC is the size of my R9 280....
Deal Expert
Aug 2, 2004
33299 posts
6992 upvotes
East Gwillimbury
I personally have complete abandoned notebooks. I only use desktops. For mobility, it is an iPad Pro which cost more than most desktops
Deal Guru
User avatar
Jun 27, 2004
12932 posts
2223 upvotes
Vancouver.bc.ca
For those talking about saving desk space, keep in mind that you can get a dock/port_replicator and stow the notebook away the same as you would the desktop.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Apr 4, 2001
11646 posts
506 upvotes
It really depends on what you want to do with your computer.

For some workloads (i.e. general purpose computing, web browsing, tablet-type games, light image editing, etc) there is no practical difference.

If you have heavy computing workloads, then you can get capable notebooks but they will be big and heavy. Desktop will always offer more for less money for such workloads.

Ergonomics are one big difference. It is easy to use notebooks in a way that will lead to pain in your shoulders, wrists, neck and/or back. You can mitigate this by docking your notebook to a desk-based keyboard, mouse, and monitor but that removes some of the advantages of a notebook and increases the cost.

Personally, I would not want to work for long periods of time on a notebook without a desk-based keyboard, mouse, and monitor.

As above, it all depends on what you want to do. It is pointless to get a powerful desktop PC if all you will be doing is Facebook, Twitter, e-mail, and watching movies for an hour or two a day.
Newbie
Mar 13, 2019
21 posts
9 upvotes
I travel for work and went with a laptop. I recommend going very high end or not at all, you cant really upgrade them after the fact and you dont to have performance issues on day 1. Look at reviews and make sure it has decent cooling. I have had very good luck with sager or clevo laptops. I bought mine from the states but would probably go for a Canadian distributor today. Be ready to open and clean the dust from the fans and exhausts every few months.
[OP]
Member
Feb 13, 2019
312 posts
158 upvotes
This is the best - you guys rock. Thanks forumers

Top