Computers & Electronics

What does it mean for an HDMI port to be HDCP compliant?

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Aug 27, 2007
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What does it mean for an HDMI port to be HDCP compliant?

I am completely ignorant when it comes to HDMI, and watching video content through an HDMI connection. So, what does it mean for a laptop's HDMI port to be HDCP compliant?
Given two laptops that have HDMI ports, what will the differences be between the laptop that has an HDCP compliant HDMI port and the other one that doesn't?
Which one of the two laptops (with or without the HDCP compliant HDMI port) should I prefer buying over the other?

I am asking this in the context of being able to play 720p and 1080p video content (movies and shows) from the laptop to a 720p/1080p LCD TV.

Thanks.
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Deal Addict
Jan 13, 2007
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That would be the first time I see a HDMI port that is no HDCP compliant. Anyway, chose the compliant one, you will not be able to use the other one to connect to almost any display. Also there is no relation with resolution
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Feb 15, 2008
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HDCP is basically a scheme of signal encryption where the software in your computer encrypts a signal and it gets sent over the wire to a HDCP compliant display. The idea being, someone can't just tap the signal in the middle, and use such for pirating movies or other 'protected' content.

I'm pretty sure any/all vendors these days make their ports HDCP compliant, since they derive their video signal from the same ATI/Nvidia/Intel chipsets anyways.
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Aug 16, 2010
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arm2000 wrote: That would be the first time I see a HDMI port that is no HDCP compliant. Anyway, chose the compliant one, you will not be able to use the other one to connect to almost any display. Also there is no relation with resolution
Mark77 wrote: HDCP is basically a scheme of signal encryption where the software in your computer encrypts a signal and it gets sent over the wire to a HDCP compliant display. The idea being, someone can't just tap the signal in the middle, and use such for pirating movies or other 'protected' content.

I'm pretty sure any/all vendors these days make their ports HDCP compliant, since they derive their video signal from the same ATI/Nvidia/Intel chipsets anyways.

Yes, there was a big stink (rightly so) that cards advertised as "HD ready" was actually lacking HDCP, making them incompatible with Blu-Ray playback. Any current video card with an HDMI card will be fine.
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Oct 15, 2005
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HDCP is the MPAA version of video DRM. both source and target hdmi points must have HDCP compliance otherwise you will get a encrypted signal resulting in a blank screen.
[OP]
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Aug 27, 2007
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Mark77 wrote: I'm pretty sure any/all vendors these days make their ports HDCP compliant, since they derive their video signal from the same ATI/Nvidia/Intel chipsets anyways.

That's what I was thinking as well. But when you look at the specs of this ASUS laptop it appears that its HDMI port is not HDCP compliant.
Perhaps, a mistake on FutureShop's part? In fact, all of the 13.3" ASUS laptops listed on FutureShop's website apparently do not have a HDCP compliant HDMI port. Weird, huh.
[OP]
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Aug 27, 2007
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DiceMan wrote: Yes, there was a big stink (rightly so) that cards advertised as "HD ready" was actually lacking HDCP, making them incompatible with Blu-Ray playback. Any current video card with an HDMI card will be fine.

So does that mean that you need an HDCP compliant HDMI port only when viewing BluRay content?
In my case, since I am really only planning on viewing HD movies/shows that I've downloaded then I do not need an HDCP HDMI port?
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DiceMan wrote: Yes, there was a big stink (rightly so) that cards advertised as "HD ready" was actually lacking HDCP, making them incompatible with Blu-Ray playback. Any current video card with an HDMI card will be fine.
Art_Vandelay wrote: So does that mean that you need an HDCP compliant HDMI port only when viewing BluRay content?
In my case, since I am really only planning on viewing HD movies/shows that I've downloaded then I do not need an HDCP HDMI port?

You've got it. HDCP is only for protected content. If you've downloaded unprotected videos (eg MKV format) then they can be view on any port, like HDMI, DVI, or even component. Same goes for Blu-Ray content if you're using an on the fly decrypter like AnyDVD.

I'm NOT sure a about NetFlix as I'm not familiar with how they work. Maybe someone can enlighten us. Pretty much anything from, say, Usenet will be viewable on any interface.
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netflix is not DRM protected.
DRM on files is a whole different animal.
it allows the file to transported and viewed to only the target.
it cannot be copied or transferred once on target.

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