Health & Wellness

what essential vitamins should i take

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Apr 25, 2011
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what essential vitamins should i take

I have never take any vitamins supplement, a friend from France suggest these 3 products:

https://www.nutripure.fr/fr/sante/1-53- ... eraux.html
https://www.nutripure.fr/fr/sante/2-omega-3-EPAX.html
https://www.nutripure.fr/fr/sante/3-mag ... ne-B6.html

what are the essentials? Magnesium, D3? as there is different brands which is recommended?

Thanks.
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Nov 13, 2008
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If you eat healthy and have no health issues, then you need 0 vitamins supplement added to your diet.
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Aug 29, 2001
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What your doctor prescribes as essential - is essential.

Otherwise, Costco multi-vitamins are a good bang for the buck. 365 in a bottle.
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Mar 28, 2006
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What's your age and sex? You can ask that question next time you see your doctor or pharmacist.

Vitamin D3 1000 IU is a good one to to consider.
Rlcky wrote: I have never take any vitamins supplement, a friend from France suggest these 3 products:

https://www.nutripure.fr/fr/sante/1-53- ... eraux.html
https://www.nutripure.fr/fr/sante/2-omega-3-EPAX.html
https://www.nutripure.fr/fr/sante/3-mag ... ne-B6.html

what are the essentials? Magnesium, D3? as there is different brands which is recommended?

Thanks.
People around you may have weaken immune system (or live with one). Wear a mask if possible, especially if you have cold symptoms.
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Aug 17, 2008
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I love the articles from the McGill Office of Science and Society. Their mission is "separating sense from nonsense". [A certain poster in the COVID thread should really read the McGill aricles].
They are always fair, balanced, and well reasoned.

"What's the scoop on the supposed uselessness of multivitamins" (from 2017 when many papers called in to question the usefulness of multi-vitamins
https://www.mcgill.ca/oss/article/contr ... upplements
There is a lot of buzz around a set of scientific papers that calls into question the effectiveness of multivitamin supplements. Let me add a few notes to the buzz as the vitamin supplement industry licks its wounds and scrambles to protect the goose that lays its golden egg. And it’s a valuable egg.

One on Omega-3 (and more detail on whether it helps with dry eye).
https://www.mcgill.ca/oss/article/healt ... d-dry-eyes


A very popular one that many doctors were recommending until recently is vitamin D. But lastest evidence has turned the tide and it is no longer recommended:
https://www.mcgill.ca/oss/article/contr ... s-question
https://www.mcgill.ca/oss/article/healt ... -vitamin-d
There was a time when everybody was taking vitamin D to prevent everything from heart disease to cancer. But as one editorialist recently put it, “then came the randomized trials.” In fact, 2019 has not been a good year for vitamin D. A lot of the trials that came out this year have been negative.


Of note, taking too much of some vitamins can increase the risk of disease

Magnesium:
https://www.mcgill.ca/oss/article/health/magnesium
Some people need it short-term (and your doctor would tell you), but no reason to take it long-term.

B-12 is recommended,
https://www.mcgill.ca/oss/article/healt ... deficiency
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Rlcky wrote: I have never take any vitamins supplement, a friend from France suggest these 3 products:

https://www.nutripure.fr/fr/sante/1-53- ... eraux.html
https://www.nutripure.fr/fr/sante/2-omega-3-EPAX.html
https://www.nutripure.fr/fr/sante/3-mag ... ne-B6.html

what are the essentials? Magnesium, D3? as there is different brands which is recommended?

Thanks.
I started taking vitamin D. Didn't know D is now D3 and have no clue the difference in them. Not sure if it makes difference or not.
I used to take B12 as was mostly eating veg for years. But Now now. Tried omega oil but the tablets so a bit large and I used to choke on them few times. All from Jamieson I think.
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Oct 10, 2020
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PhatboyC wrote: If you eat healthy and have no health issues, then you need 0 vitamins supplement added to your diet.
Nonsense and it's a myth promoted by the food industries. For example, the recommended intake of potassium is 4,700 mg/day (that's like 8 potatoes or 10 bananas). You think you got enough potassium from your "healthy diet" yesterday?

Note that you can't get daily recommended potassium dosage over the counter ( ~80mg per tablet only ) because some people have impaired kidney function. Which is another nonsense.

But ...

Most people who eat a healthy diet should get enough potassium naturally. Low potassium is associated with a risk of high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, arthritis, cancer, digestive disorders, and infertility. For people with low potassium, doctors sometimes recommend improved diets -- or potassium supplements -- to prevent or treat some of these conditions.

- https://www.webmd.com/diet/supplement-guide-potassium#1

Note the "healthy diet" nonsense again.
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Mar 14, 2005
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I recommend u read T. Colin Campbell's book, "Whole: Rethinking the Science of Nutrition" and eat a whole food plant-based diet.
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Feb 4, 2015
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It's not necessarily how well you eat.

Obviously that plays a role however also genetics, exercise, smoking/alcohol, AND how well your body absorbs vitamins and minerals from foods.

Get a blood test and see if any lacking.
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Sr. Member
Dec 3, 2019
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Ontario
Agreed.
Get a blood test first and see a Naturopath.

Vitamin D - Most Canadians are deficient of Vitamin D in the winter.

Thorne Research, Sisu and Natural Factors are the better brands.
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Mar 28, 2006
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Be careful these studies are very specific, they are not designed to prove the supplement is good or bad or useless in general. Vitamin D deficiency is not uncommon in Canada and it can cause many chronic conditions (including some very rare symptoms). Taking 1000 IU especially in winter is a good idea. I wouldn't take more than 2000 IU though because many foods are fortified with small amount of it and too many can be harmful. As usual, always good to check with your doctor or pharmacist first.

Same for Omega-3, it is one of the few supplements that worth consideration but I generally recommend people to eat fish instead.

General rule of thumb is check with your doctor or pharmacist first, and never take any megadose unless your doctor prescribe it purposely.

PS: Calcium citrate is another good one to consider.
multimut wrote: I love the articles from the McGill Office of Science and Society. Their mission is "separating sense from nonsense". [A certain poster in the COVID thread should really read the McGill aricles].
They are always fair, balanced, and well reasoned.

"What's the scoop on the supposed uselessness of multivitamins" (from 2017 when many papers called in to question the usefulness of multi-vitamins
https://www.mcgill.ca/oss/article/contr ... upplements
There is a lot of buzz around a set of scientific papers that calls into question the effectiveness of multivitamin supplements. Let me add a few notes to the buzz as the vitamin supplement industry licks its wounds and scrambles to protect the goose that lays its golden egg. And it’s a valuable egg.

One on Omega-3 (and more detail on whether it helps with dry eye).
https://www.mcgill.ca/oss/article/healt ... d-dry-eyes


A very popular one that many doctors were recommending until recently is vitamin D. But lastest evidence has turned the tide and it is no longer recommended:
https://www.mcgill.ca/oss/article/contr ... s-question
https://www.mcgill.ca/oss/article/healt ... -vitamin-d
There was a time when everybody was taking vitamin D to prevent everything from heart disease to cancer. But as one editorialist recently put it, “then came the randomized trials.” In fact, 2019 has not been a good year for vitamin D. A lot of the trials that came out this year have been negative.


Of note, taking too much of some vitamins can increase the risk of disease

Magnesium:
https://www.mcgill.ca/oss/article/health/magnesium
Some people need it short-term (and your doctor would tell you), but no reason to take it long-term.

B-12 is recommended,
https://www.mcgill.ca/oss/article/healt ... deficiency
People around you may have weaken immune system (or live with one). Wear a mask if possible, especially if you have cold symptoms.
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PhatboyC wrote: If you eat healthy and have no health issues, then you need 0 vitamins supplement added to your diet.
Magnesium is not as abundant as it was once. So definitely supplement mag
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multimut wrote: I love the articles from the McGill Office of Science and Society. Their mission is "separating sense from nonsense". [A certain poster in the COVID thread should really read the McGill aricles].
They are always fair, balanced, and well reasoned.

"What's the scoop on the supposed uselessness of multivitamins" (from 2017 when many papers called in to question the usefulness of multi-vitamins
https://www.mcgill.ca/oss/article/contr ... upplements
There is a lot of buzz around a set of scientific papers that calls into question the effectiveness of multivitamin supplements. Let me add a few notes to the buzz as the vitamin supplement industry licks its wounds and scrambles to protect the goose that lays its golden egg. And it’s a valuable egg.

One on Omega-3 (and more detail on whether it helps with dry eye).
https://www.mcgill.ca/oss/article/healt ... d-dry-eyes


A very popular one that many doctors were recommending until recently is vitamin D. But lastest evidence has turned the tide and it is no longer recommended:
https://www.mcgill.ca/oss/article/contr ... s-question
https://www.mcgill.ca/oss/article/healt ... -vitamin-d
There was a time when everybody was taking vitamin D to prevent everything from heart disease to cancer. But as one editorialist recently put it, “then came the randomized trials.” In fact, 2019 has not been a good year for vitamin D. A lot of the trials that came out this year have been negative.


Of note, taking too much of some vitamins can increase the risk of disease

Magnesium:
https://www.mcgill.ca/oss/article/health/magnesium
Some people need it short-term (and your doctor would tell you), but no reason to take it long-term.

B-12 is recommended,
https://www.mcgill.ca/oss/article/healt ... deficiency
Good reads but only answer very specific topics, ie vitamin D and cancer correlation, vs overall benefits.

Read like a blog post, so not really any different than any other source. I prefer examine.com instead
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Jan 17, 2009
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Get a blood test and see what your body lacking. My doctor does one every few years as part of a checkup. I was talking B-12 because of what I read online and my doctor told me to stop because my blood test was showing me as high in B12. Pretty much every adult in Canada is Vitamin D deficient (you can get a tested to be sure), that's pretty much all I take down and some fish oil pills but those aren't really "vitamins".

I wouldn't just take vitamins because people on the internet told you to, it's best to talk to your doctor.
Jr. Member
Oct 26, 2019
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Ecsta wrote: Get a blood test and see what your body lacking. My doctor does one every few years as part of a checkup. I was talking B-12 because of what I read online and my doctor told me to stop because my blood test was showing me as high in B12. Pretty much every adult in Canada is Vitamin D deficient (you can get a tested to be sure), that's pretty much all I take down and some fish oil pills but those aren't really "vitamins".

I wouldn't just take vitamins because people on the internet told you to, it's best to talk to your doctor.
Is there a specific type of test to ask for, or will just asking for a 'blood test' be adequate and show everything?
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YourManager wrote: Is there a specific type of test to ask for, or will just asking for a 'blood test' be adequate and show everything?
Well I'm not a doctor but there's a bunch check boxes on the blood test requisition form. Basically what I said is "I'm trying to take my health more seriously and would like to know what vitamins/minerals I'm deficient in so I can take a supplement for them" and discuss. I told him what supplements I was taking and what ones I was considering taking, and go from there.

If it's been a few years since your last one or depending on your age you may never have had one before, you may be due for one as part of your physical/health checkup anyways.. It kills 2 birds with 1 stone. Also if you've recently had one they can just pull up the results.

Also what's covered depends on province... For example in Ontario the Vitamin D test is a paid test (~$200 iirc) unless you meet certain medical requirements. The majority of people are low on it anyways so its cheaper to just assume you're low (if you really want to know you can pay out of pocket) and take a daily supplement.

Hope that helps.
Sr. Member
May 19, 2005
643 posts
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Toronto
Ecsta wrote:
Also what's covered depends on province... For example in Ontario the Vitamin D test is a paid test (~$200 iirc) unless you meet certain medical requirements. The majority of people are low on it anyways so its cheaper to just assume you're low (if you really want to know you can pay out of pocket) and take a daily supplement.
Vitamin D test cost $39 in Ontario from Lifelabs. It can be expensed 100% on some insurance plan's health spending account, just like the covid antibodies test.
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K10 wrote: Vitamin D test cost $39 in Ontario from Lifelabs. It can be expensed 100% on some insurance plan's health spending account, just like the covid antibodies test.
I did not know it was that cheap! Thanks for posting that I'll definitely just pay out of pocket and get it checked next time. Not sure why my doctor thought it was much more (this was years ago).

Do you know if they have to take an additional/separate vial of blood for it?
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Oct 23, 2008
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Without knowing your life style and diet, no one here can advise you of what you should take. Best one to advise you would be your MD.

Although it's probably safe to say Vit.C if you don't consume enough fresh citrus fruits, and Vit.D, as most Canadians are lacking it, especially during the winter months.
Tis banana is IRIE 😎

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May 19, 2005
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Ecsta wrote: I did not know it was that cheap! Thanks for posting that I'll definitely just pay out of pocket and get it checked next time. Not sure why my doctor thought it was much more (this was years ago).

Do you know if they have to take an additional/separate vial of blood for it?
I think they take 5 vial of blood which is more than normal when I request these additional voluntary tests along with the standard check, so I guess probably yes but not certain.

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