Art and Photography

What happened to the image quality?

  • Last Updated:
  • Oct 9th, 2018 12:18 am
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[OP]
Deal Guru
User avatar
May 6, 2005
10700 posts
996 upvotes
Vancouver

What happened to the image quality?

Here is a camera raw dialog for a photo, it's displayed at 100%:

https://imgur.com/a/pc401Jk

5D Mark IV and I shot both 70-200 F4L IS and 100-400 F4L IS today. Both are showing this weird look, which makes me question my camera?

The details like all smudgy / slightly out of focus. Hard to describe but hopefully very obvious?

Never seen something like this before with my photos
6 replies
Member
User avatar
Aug 8, 2008
406 posts
94 upvotes
Mississauga
I can think of 2 possibilities:

1. Shot with IS on while the camera was on a tripod (not sure if those lenses have the tripod detection capability).
2. Atmospheric haze from humidity but doesn't seem like it.

Also, re Adobe RGB, not sure if it was left on default settings, but best not to use it with 8 bit color. You can get more banding that way.
Deal Fanatic
Mar 17, 2004
5124 posts
511 upvotes
Are you using a cheap clear/UV filter? try taking it off.
Deal Guru
Jan 27, 2006
14837 posts
7785 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
If the results were similar across the two lenses in the same situation, then the issue would have to be what-ever was in common across the two photos (ie it's not the lenses).

Are all of your photos today showing the exact same issue regardless of location?
Deal Addict
Aug 12, 2004
4456 posts
2109 upvotes
Calgary
Have you tried shooting in jpeg to see if the problem persists? Do you normally shoot in Adobe RGB 8 bit?

If the problem is not shown in the jpeg, it likely is a Lightroom or Photoshop setting. If the problem follows your jpeg processed in camera check your camera settings, or worse, you may have a failing sensor.

https://scottwyden.com/bad-camera-sensor/
Sr. Member
Nov 21, 2006
562 posts
328 upvotes
Heat haze
The reason why your picture is not sharp is because heat waves are bending the light and confusing your camera's AF system.
It usually happens when using long focal lengths to photograph distant subjects in specific atmospheric conditions.
Not your fault or anything wrong with your equipment

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