Shopping Discussion

what happens to packages delivered to business buildings that are closed?

  • Last Updated:
  • Mar 29th, 2020 12:31 pm
[OP]
Deal Addict
May 1, 2006
3813 posts
317 upvotes
Toronto

what happens to packages delivered to business buildings that are closed?

i've been expecting a package before all of this covid 19 shit started getting serious (in toronto). the package is addressed to my work, which is a business on the 4th floor of a building that houses a bunch of other companies. now that everything is shut down, no one can go inside the building without a key fob. usually, mail people come up and deliver it to our door.

what happens to the package now? does it just sit at canada post for the next 2-3-4-whatever months??
9 replies
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 16, 2015
1927 posts
1451 upvotes
Canada
stevelam wrote: i've been expecting a package before all of this covid 19 shit started getting serious (in toronto). the package is addressed to my work, which is a business on the 4th floor of a building that houses a bunch of other companies. now that everything is shut down, no one can go inside the building without a key fob. usually, mail people come up and deliver it to our door.

what happens to the package now? does it just sit at canada post for the next 2-3-4-whatever months??
yes
Deal Addict
May 22, 2015
1503 posts
1722 upvotes
Vancouver
They may redirect it if you call in. It depends what the tracking says, the CSR you talk to can tell you what it was held or carded as. If it was in fact carded to an outlet you can go pick it up with a business card and driver's license (no pickup slip required). If they're holding it then they won't hold it forever, things are already piling up. SOP is to hold for 2 weeks but in reality they could send it back immediately if they know you're closed. Businesses are supposed to be paying for mail holds during this otherwise someone should be going to collect the mail from the depot.
Member
Apr 2, 2011
497 posts
180 upvotes
courier delivery services that are aware of certain businesses being closed would have their parcels returned to shipper.

There is no knowing how long businesses would be closed for, so the best and only option at this point would be to return.
Sr. Member
Dec 18, 2017
816 posts
455 upvotes
London, On
NKode wrote: courier delivery services that are aware of certain businesses being closed would have their parcels returned to shipper.

There is no knowing how long businesses would be closed for, so the best and only option at this point would be to return.
That's not something that would automatically happen. Shipments that are returned are sent back by shipper's authorization since they are paying for the return shipping charges. Courier companies don't just return things for no charge because a business was closed today. If anything right now, courier companies are being more lenient on their timeline for holding items, not being more strict.
Member
Apr 2, 2011
497 posts
180 upvotes
During this crisis, it's implied a business closed, with no communicated return to normal operation, will have their parcels returned to shipper. If there's notification for when normal business is to resume, then I can see packages being held for at least 14 days.

Most major couriers are not in a position to hold the quantity of business packages for an unforeseen period of time. You'll be lucky to garner an interception to an alternative address.
Sr. Member
Dec 18, 2017
816 posts
455 upvotes
London, On
NKode wrote: During this crisis, it's implied a business closed, with no communicated return to normal operation, will have their parcels returned to shipper. If there's notification for when normal business is to resume, then I can see packages being held for at least 14 days.

Most major couriers are not in a position to hold the quantity of business packages for an unforeseen period of time. You'll be lucky to garner an interception to an alternative address.
Certainly not what I'm seeing, and I work in that industry. At present, it's basically being treated like the seasonal Christmas closures. Many businesses are making arrangements to have items shipped a couple times a week, where they will send someone in specifically to wait for deliveries. Also, many places were getting stuff already in the chain when the closures started happening, but now a lot fewer shippers are actually sending out, especially to businesses they know are closed. We haven't at this stage started returning anything immediately upon realization a business was closed or for any other unilateral reason.
Member
Apr 2, 2011
497 posts
180 upvotes
Sweeping decisions are made sometimes to avoid sending couriers to known closures during what would be normal business hours. The individual courier is unfortunately the one who makes that decision, and hopefully in good faith.

Seasonal Christmas closures are easy enough to manage. But these levels of business unavailability is uncharted territory for major couriers. They simply cannot hold onto the level of packages that customers would have been ordering.

As more businesses become unavailable, the greater the capacity impact in the warehouse.
Deal Addict
May 22, 2015
1503 posts
1722 upvotes
Vancouver
We already have a full trailer of parcels that has been sealed for 2 weeks. At this point there's no way to go back in to find certain items so it's all going to be returned to sender. Carriers at my station are holding stuff as long as they can but there's only so much room, if a business rep doesn't come in within a week it's gotta go back. We can't hold everything forever and we can't send business parcels to pickup outlets (not that they have room either). We're having enough problems storing items that customers have paid for hold services on.

It's just an unfortunate situation for the person who ordered. Tons of small registered items ordered from China 3-4 months ago are the worst culprits, most people stopped their domestic orders before businesses closed.
Member
Apr 2, 2011
497 posts
180 upvotes
A lot of businesses acted recklessly when instructing its employees to work from home. In transit packages were left stranded with no one to accept them.

We made the decision as of March 10 to begin returning business parcels when there was no one available to accept them. The only exceptions were made to businesses that indicated specific period of closures, which are being held for 14 days, and critical shipments to the medical field.

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