Parenting & Family

What kind of grades one needs in 10th, 11th and 12th to get admission in good college or Univ program?

  • Last Updated:
  • Nov 13th, 2019 2:27 pm
[OP]
Banned
Nov 1, 2013
304 posts
42 upvotes

What kind of grades one needs in 10th, 11th and 12th to get admission in good college or Univ program?

I would like my children to aim high and major in Science, Math or Technology/Computers/Engineering etc.
However I am not sure what kind of marks they are supposed to achieve in 10th or 11th to be accepted to reputed colleges or Universities in order to have bright future?
Is it something like 80%+? or are there other factors that go into it?
Can someone please shine a light how the system works?
Thank you in advance.
38 replies
Deal Addict
Jan 19, 2008
1294 posts
835 upvotes
Etobicoke
You need good marks in grade 11. When you apply in grade 12, the only complete marks are from grade 11.
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2013
3249 posts
1084 upvotes
Woodbridge
Grade 11 marks are used for early acceptance but the offers can be rescinded if the marks aren’t maintained in Grade 12. Other than that, Grade 11 marks won’t matter. Admissions averages vary greatly by program and school. You can find those averages by visiting the websites of those programs. Waterloo Computer Science requires low 90s, U of T high 80s. Most applied sciences or business degrees would require at a minimum mid-80s in the six Grade 12 courses. Prerequisites vary as well. I’ll also say that many STEM fields are over saturated. People go into these fields assuming they’ll be guaranteed a good job, but unless you’re specialized in certain niche areas, it’s not that easy. Many people are finding it difficult to find employment with just a BSc, even for entry level positions that several years ago would be filled by a BSc. How old are your kids now and what are their interests?
Deal Addict
Jan 2, 2015
1788 posts
1120 upvotes
NOT centre of Univer…
Louking wrote: I would like my children to aim high and major in Science, Math or Technology/Computers/Engineering etc.
However I am not sure what kind of marks they are supposed to achieve in 10th or 11th to be accepted to reputed colleges or Universities in order to have bright future?
Is it something like 80%+? or are there other factors that go into it?
Can someone please shine a light how the system works?
Thank you in advance.
There are minimum grades that are posted on the various University sites, but having those grades do not guarantee the child gets accepted. Some programs are capped, so even if they meet the minimum, if there are a lot of strong students, they may still not get in. My nephews program needed a min 80 to be considered, but that year, there was a single student that got in with less than 89%.

The other thing to consider is that STEM may or may not be the end all and be all. You may want one thing for your child, but your child may want something else. Too often I hear about people that picked their degrees based on what their parents wanted and are miserable. Guide them to certain areas, but if that's not what they want, then help them find a career in something related to what they enjoy.

Here's a good article regarding STEM careers' https://www.nytimes.com/2019/09/20/busi ... aries.html

Sure, if you child is interested in STEM then encourage them. In my case, I have to gifted kids who do brilliantly in math and science but dislike them. One loves drawing and art, so we have been exposing her to architechture. The other one loves debating and politics, so we are exposing her to law. They have the aptitude for STEM but not the desire. So as parent, its to help them look for options that will didn't know were there rather than force them into our desires.
On a 'smart' device that isn't always so smart. So please forgive the autocorrects and typos. If it bothers you, then don't read my posts, but don't waste my time correcting me. If you can get past the typos, then my posts generally have some value.
Sr. Member
Jan 8, 2009
739 posts
387 upvotes
GTA
Our daughter is in her 3rd year at the University of Toronto and she's doing really really well. Her marks are excellent, she volunteers with some programs she's passionate about, does work-study on campus, has made good connections with her professors, etc. She was given early acceptance based on her grade 11 marks to all the schools she applied to minus one which didn't do early acceptance and she got an offer from them as soon as they started handing them out. She's doing a double major - one arts and one science - and has her eye on graduate school.

While STEM degrees are great, they're not the end all and be all. There's a good article here: https://www.bbc.com/worklife/article/20 ... p-for-life which is worth reading

Also, while it's important to make sure your kids have good marks to get into schools, it will serve them even better if they are self-motivated and have good time management skills. Kids need to keep on top of their work and other commitments but they also need some down time and room to breathe and they need to learn how to build that into their schedule(s).

And IN university, marks are not the end all and be all. They need to show prospective employers and professional/graduate schools that they have actual skills via volunteer, work, research, etc. Both schools and employers are looking for well-rounded employees/students.

Are you in Ontario, or elsewhere?
Member
Feb 13, 2017
284 posts
122 upvotes
Mississauga
My coworker’s son just started at the co-op computer Engineering program at Waterloo and the cut off was 96%. I was in shock. Co-op will always be higher. When I went to UofT the coverage needed for business was low-mid 80s. I imagine it to be mid 80s now (I have absolutely no back up for this).
[OP]
Banned
Nov 1, 2013
304 posts
42 upvotes
hey
First of Thanks everyone for nice replies. There is lot of information in this thread that I would not have come across on my own. Much appreciated.
I am bit puzzled though - on one hand competition to get into STEM has already become quite fierce and is likely to become insane due to influx of huge number of international student, yet on the other hand our education system in Ontario is damn laid back. How does one reconcile these two opposite facts?
There is no pressure at all on the students to excel. teachers don;t give a damn, can't discipline the students, parents have no time to educate the children every day after work and students....well...they can't bothered to take their eyes off the digital screens lest they miss a second of drama on social media, games and instant messengers.
So How exactly are some students managing to get 90%? What am I missing to get my children see what lies ahead?
Deal Addict
Jan 2, 2015
1788 posts
1120 upvotes
NOT centre of Univer…
Louking wrote:
n one hand competition to get into STEM has already become quite fierce and is likely to become insane due to influx of huge number of international student, yet on the other hand our education system in Ontario is damn laid back. How does one reconcile these two opposite facts?
I don't think they are opposite facts at all. There is a different values system on education in other countries. I don't know much about the Ont system, but assume it's similar to other provinces as being more 'laid' back. You as a parent decide what is important to the growth of your child.

There is no pressure at all on the students to excel. teachers don;t give a damn, can't discipline the students, parents have no time to educate the children every day after work and students....well...they can't bothered to take their eyes off the digital screens lest they miss a second of drama on social media, games and instant messengers. So How exactly are some students managing to get 90%? What am I missing to get my children see what lies ahead?
From the research I have read, and what I am observing, kids have a ton of pressures, they are just not all academic. I am pretty fortunate that academics comes easily to my kids, but they don't automatically get 90%. I think what is more important than the grades PARENTS need to teach their kids to deal with stress, develop strong learning ethics which develop into a strong work ethic. I have said in another thread, I don't take as much time to educate my kids in terms of content they are doing in school, but rather to teach them the skills to get the homework done and to learn themselves.

Also, keep in mind not every kid can reasonable get 90s in STEM. They have to want it to work as hard as they need to. That's a hard truth for parents, forcing kids into an area they don't enjoy is not going to motivate them to work hard enough to get the marks. Even as a parent you help them with homework and teach them every day, when they go off to University theirs a high chance they will hate it or drop out. I think parents are much better to help them instill internal motivation.
On a 'smart' device that isn't always so smart. So please forgive the autocorrects and typos. If it bothers you, then don't read my posts, but don't waste my time correcting me. If you can get past the typos, then my posts generally have some value.
Deal Addict
Feb 4, 2010
3865 posts
2661 upvotes
Parents - instead of focusing on what YOU want, why not focus on what your kids want? Your kids aren't living their lives to fulfill YOUR dreams or what you wish you did.
Before responding to someone (online or offline) ask yourself: is it true? is it helpful? is it kind? is it necessary? This comes from an old Sufi adage that is so relevant today.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2011
34501 posts
20539 upvotes
Center of Universe
hierophant wrote: Parents - instead of focusing on what YOU want, why not focus on what your kids want? Your kids aren't living their lives to fulfill YOUR dreams or what you wish you did.
Oh, if my kid wants school and board to be fully paid for, it's my way or the highway...
Deal Addict
Feb 4, 2010
3865 posts
2661 upvotes
vkizzle wrote: Oh, if my kid wants school and board to be fully paid for, it's my way or the highway...
Well let's hope for humanity's sake you don't reproduce. You have a lot of learning and growing up to do if that's your take on life. That's what you call CONDITIONAL love and support.
Before responding to someone (online or offline) ask yourself: is it true? is it helpful? is it kind? is it necessary? This comes from an old Sufi adage that is so relevant today.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2011
34501 posts
20539 upvotes
Center of Universe
hierophant wrote: Well let's hope for humanity's sake you don't reproduce. You have a lot of learning and growing up to do if that's your take on life. That's what you call CONDITIONAL love and support.
That's hypocritical of you to tell me how to raise my kids.
Deal Addict
Feb 4, 2010
3865 posts
2661 upvotes
vkizzle wrote: That's hypocritical of you to tell me how to raise my kids.
LOL but I didn't. That's what you chose to read into it.
Before responding to someone (online or offline) ask yourself: is it true? is it helpful? is it kind? is it necessary? This comes from an old Sufi adage that is so relevant today.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2011
34501 posts
20539 upvotes
Center of Universe
hierophant wrote: LOL but I didn't. That's what you chose to read into it.
Umm, you said..."for humanity's sake you don't reproduce"
Which clearly shows you disagreeing on how I'm raising my kids.
Deal Addict
Feb 4, 2010
3865 posts
2661 upvotes
vkizzle wrote: Umm, you said..."for humanity's sake you don't reproduce"
Which clearly shows you disagreeing on how I'm raising my kids.
🤣Smiling Face With Open Mouth And Cold Sweat
Before responding to someone (online or offline) ask yourself: is it true? is it helpful? is it kind? is it necessary? This comes from an old Sufi adage that is so relevant today.

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