Food & Drink

What are some of your favourite dry rubs?

  • Last Updated:
  • Oct 3rd, 2016 9:54 am
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Aug 22, 2006
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Astin wrote:
death_hawk wrote:
Sep 9th, 2016 12:10 pm
Assuming chickens cost $8 (which they do) if I could get a whole chicken for $.80 I would for sure butcher it.
Chicks are pretty cheap, just have to find the inflection point where the cost of feed and care for a few months per bird works out to $0.80 each. Of course, you may end up with a large number of chickens, but if you turn around and sell a bunch, you'd really be bringing your net price down for your own chicken. Winking Face
I've always wondered what a chicken actually costs to produce.
I know in the US they sell for like a buck a pound which works out to $3-4 per bird.
After retailer markup etc, I could see it going for $2-3. $0.80 might be a stretch though.
Or maybe not, I have no idea.
But buying a whole chicken and taking it apart is always more cost effective than buying the individual pieces. It's a question of what the value of your time is (and cutting up a whole chicken, again, takes only a few minutes or less).
I'd agree with this point as well, but as a consumer I still buy chicken parts for the sole reason that I don't use breasts or drums very often and use a TON of wings and thighs.
As an example, I've eaten about 50 chickens worth of wings last month. While I could easily deal with the 100 thighs, the 100 breasts is a whole different story.

This is exactly the same reason I don't like buying whole cows.
I have basically zero use for the entirety of the round and I hate the tenderloin.
I do however want extra briskets, tongues, tails, and various other cuts the animal has a limited number of.
Anyway, combine a ton of salt, black pepper, garlic powder, and a chili powder to get basic rub. Add smoked paprika, onion powder, maybe some ground mustard and ground coriander seed and you're really on to something.
Basically this, except omit the salt.
As a rule, you want to season and spice your things separately.
This way you can add more flavor without adding more seasoning.
Seriously, take a look at your favourite spice rub and read the ingredients. They're in descending order of volume, so trial-and-error to make a better rub is easy.
This doesn't really help that much either because a lot of things can be simply listed as "spices"
There's rarely a breakdown of every single herb/spice they use.
But, you should still read the ingredients. That $6 bottle of rub probably contains 50% salt because salt is heavy.
cRaZyRaVr wrote:
Sep 9th, 2016 2:02 pm
In my case I pay for convenience and knowing that they are not absolutely laced with SALT.
Wait. Are you making or buying?
Buying usually results in a product that contains more salt than anything.
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Mar 11, 2004
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death_hawk wrote:
Sep 10th, 2016 11:43 am
Wait. Are you making or buying?
Buying usually results in a product that contains more salt than anything.
Buying. I met this guy who makes them, Dave, there is a story behind why he does what he does. Look it up and show me the first ingredient = salt. They are all very VERY good. David's Condiments
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Jul 11, 2011
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...for an economical rub, The Keg Steak Spice at Costco (especially when on sale) is a great value. Try it on BBQ'd pork tenderloin. It gives the pork a really nice, almost smokey flavor.
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hebsie wrote:
Sep 12th, 2016 10:20 am
...for an economical rub, The Keg Steak Spice at Costco (especially when on sale) is a great value. Try it on BBQ'd pork tenderloin. It gives the pork a really nice, almost smokey flavor.
Yup, second the recommendation for Keg Steak Spice, I get the low salt version at WalMart. Good all purpose seasoning.
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Aug 22, 2006
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cRaZyRaVr wrote:
Sep 12th, 2016 10:04 am
death_hawk wrote:
Sep 10th, 2016 11:43 am
Wait. Are you making or buying?
Buying usually results in a product that contains more salt than anything.
Buying. I met this guy who makes them, Dave, there is a story behind why he does what he does. Look it up and show me the first ingredient = salt. They are all very VERY good. David's Condiments
Hence why I said *usually*
There's obviously a few examples of rubs that don't contain salt but the majority of them do, most times as the first ingredient.

In this case, your particular rub doesn't contain salt but I bet that little bottle is $4 or $5 which still reinforces my first point.
I'd be spending $5 worth of seasonings to season $5 worth of ribs. Well maybe $10 worth of ribs but still.
Seasonings shouldn't make up 33% of the food cost.
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Jan 8, 2007
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For pork (I use it on ribs and any pork going into the smoker). All of the guests at my table rave about it.
3 parts garlic powder
2 parts salt
2 parts sugar
3 parts smoked paprika
1 part each of: fine-ground espresso, cumin, cinnamon, onion powder, fresh ground black pepper, mild or hot curry, and chipotle or ancho chili powder

Sounds odd, tastes awesome. try it. Mop with a mix of apple juice and apple cider vinegar. Come back and thank me later.Winking Face
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Jul 29, 2007
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Look up Jan's Rub. It's from the Bradley smoker forums and is widely used on that site. It was originally formulated for chicken but it works well on everything. Here it is

1 cup + 4 tbsp sugar
1/4 cup Lawry’s seasoned salt
1/4 cup garlic salt
1/4 cup + 1 1/2 tsp celery salt
1/4 cup onion salt
1/2 cup paprika
3 Tbsp chili powder
2 Tbsp black pepper
1 Tbsp lemon pepper
2 tsp celery seed
2 tsp dry ground sage
1 tsp dry mustard
1/2 tsp dry ground thyme
1/2 tsp cayenne
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See I made the Jans rub and threw it out. WAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY too salty and just didnt add any "special" flavour to chicken or ribs at all.
So as you can see from what everyone uses, each of us has different taste and you will have to find something that you like, trial and error.
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Sep 1, 2005
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Kenji's all purpose rub. Most people will have almost all of these spices in their pantry so there's no excuse not to mix your own IMO. You can use this as a base and add other stuff as your tastes dictate. Add more sugar for pork ribs, add more black pepper for brisket etc.

For the Rub:
1/3 cup paprika (2 ounces; 60g)
1/3 cup dark brown sugar (2.5 ounces; 70g)
1/4 cup kosher salt (1.5 ounces; 45g)
4 teaspoons (12g) ground mustard
2 teaspoons (6g) freshly ground black pepper
2 teaspoons (6g) ground coriander seed
1 tablespoon (5g) dried oregano
1 tablespoon (10g) granulated garlic powder
1 tablespoon (10g) granulated onion powder


For the Rub: Whisk all rub ingredients together to combine. Use your fingertips to break up any large clumps of brown sugar. For better flavor, before combining, toast ground mustard, black pepper, and coriander in a dry skillet over medium heat until fragrant. Store rub in a sealed container at room temperature for several months. (It will lose flavor over time, but it will not go bad.)
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cRaZyRaVr wrote:
Sep 30th, 2016 9:42 am
See I made the Jans rub and threw it out. WAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY too salty and just didnt add any "special" flavour to chicken or ribs at all.
So as you can see from what everyone uses, each of us has different taste and you will have to find something that you like, trial and error.
See it's mostly used as a dry rub for smoking as that's what it was made for, so perhaps it mellows out with that technique. I've smoked with it a lot and used it directly on other things and it's been good for me, and the whole forum practically uses it! I love it particularly for the celery seed, it just smells so nice
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cRaZyRaVr wrote:
Sep 30th, 2016 9:42 am
WAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY too salty and just didnt add any "special" flavour to chicken or ribs at all.
Jesus crap.
That's like 40% salt.
Why the hell are they using garlic salt/celery salt/onion salt when they should be using garlic powder/celery seed/onion powder.

EDIT: There's a reason all my rubs are salt free.
Seasoning and flavoring should be done in 2 separate steps so it's controllable.
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Sep 18, 2009
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XtremeModder wrote:
Sep 8th, 2016 1:28 am
Jucius Maximus wrote:
Sep 8th, 2016 1:23 am
I want to give a big recommendation of the "Fire in the Kitchen" brand for really nice tasting dry rubs, many of them with NO sugar. I have like 6 packs of this stuff at home right now and stock up when they're on sale.

For chicken and fish, I find their "One Rub" is really delicious. It's a good "general" spice rub with a little bit of everything. I can't really put my finger on what it tastes like, but I can say it is GOOD! And the flavour does not fatigue. I have been using it for over a year and I'm not getting tired of it in the slightest.

I marinate pork ribs for a day in Piri Piri - spicy enough but there's actually a lot of flavour to it as well.

The Smokin Curry is an awesome choice for Shrimp.

If you are buying AAA steaks, I recommend nothing more than pink Himalayan salt and fresh cracked pepper.
Will look into these.

Thanks
What does pink salt add to flavor that can't be had with kosher salt? I mean, the salt draws fluid out of the steaks, and a crust is formed. What could be left of Himalayan clay?
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death_hawk wrote:
Sep 30th, 2016 5:50 pm
cRaZyRaVr wrote:
Sep 30th, 2016 9:42 am
WAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY too salty and just didnt add any "special" flavour to chicken or ribs at all.
Jesus crap.
That's like 40% salt.
Why the hell are they using garlic salt/celery salt/onion salt when they should be using garlic powder/celery seed/onion powder.

EDIT: There's a reason all my rubs are salt free.
Seasoning and flavoring should be done in 2 separate steps so it's controllable.
Exactly!!!

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