Food & Drink

What are you having for dinner? *PICS*

  • Last Updated:
  • Oct 24th, 2020 8:36 pm
Deal Addict
Jan 19, 2004
1858 posts
338 upvotes
Toronto
Pho in progress- been simmering for 4 hours.
Combination of beef marrow, beef and pork bones, and other spices.

Here’s the end result. Forgot to buy basil and bean sprouts from the market.
Images
  • BB45238C-2940-45DA-91E0-473AFFB9AD6A.jpeg
  • 3E8CA1B0-0829-4D68-AA29-D8DE4E536A7E.jpeg
  • E409B767-FA82-42F5-AC36-2865153B035B.jpeg
Last edited by Dragon120 on Sep 6th, 2020 6:40 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Deal Fanatic
Jun 24, 2006
8464 posts
2931 upvotes
Dragon120 wrote: Pho is progress- been simmering for 4 hours.
Combination of beef marrow, beef and pork bones, and other spices.
I don't know what this is....... But I want some when it is done!
Deal Addict
Jan 19, 2004
1858 posts
338 upvotes
Toronto
Gutty96 wrote: I don't know what this is....... But I want some when it is done!
It’s beef broth with noodles - a Vietnamese cuisine.
Deal Fanatic
Jun 24, 2006
8464 posts
2931 upvotes
Dragon120 wrote: It’s beef broth with noodles - a Vietnamese cuisine.
Looks absolutely delicious!
Deal Addict
Jul 7, 2017
4635 posts
2013 upvotes
SW corner of the cou…
Part of my dinner tonight is spaghetti ala carbonara, with home-made pancetta.
Cream rises to the top. So does scum.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Jan 27, 2004
43390 posts
6634 upvotes
T.O. Lotto Captain
Dragon120 wrote: Pho in progress- been simmering for 4 hours.
Combination of beef marrow, beef and pork bones, and other spices.

Here’s the end result. Forgot to buy basil and bean sprouts from the market.
Growing up in a Vietnamese/Chinese house hold... we never put basil or sliced onions in our pho.
It was always green onions, cilantro, mint from the garden.
Slight regional difference perhaps. My parents were from the far north. So North, there was a foot bridge to China.

My parents knew the board guard by name.
It cost a pack of cigarettes to cross the bridge. Not sure if they were joking when they told me that story about the cigarettes...
But he made sure no one stole your shit. He was a local cop or something.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Aug 16, 2010
6348 posts
3255 upvotes
Aurora
-=phelan=- wrote: Made some x.o. sauced beef ho fun the other day. Tasted good for home made but missing that "wok hei" you'd get from a actual restaurant.
Looks good to me! Did you use dried or fresh rice noodles? I usually use fresh, along with velveting the beef (or pork, or chicken) with baking soda to get the restaurant tenderness. Yes, I can do ho fun close to restaurant but not exact. Sometimes I wish I had those jet engine restaurant wok burners with a billion BTU.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 21, 2008
4020 posts
789 upvotes
West Side GTA
DiceMan wrote: Looks good to me! Did you use dried or fresh rice noodles? I usually use fresh, along with velveting the beef (or pork, or chicken) with baking soda to get the restaurant tenderness. Yes, I can do ho fun close to restaurant but not exact. Sometimes I wish I had those jet engine restaurant wok burners with a billion BTU.
Always use fresh noodles for this case, will only use dry noodles if under dire circumstances lol.

Baking soda is a must for tenderizing the beef a little...my question is what pot do you guys use for cooking rice noodles this way? I have to use a good non-stick pan to get it right because otherwise it "sticks" too much and I end up breaking the noodles into tiny pieces which is no go :/
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Aug 16, 2010
6348 posts
3255 upvotes
Aurora
-=phelan=- wrote: Always use fresh noodles for this case, will only use dry noodles if under dire circumstances lol.
Dire circumstances, yeah. Like when my damn Asian supermarket runs of of fresh when I drop by at 5pm. Then I have to either grab the dried crap or figure out an alternate dinner menu.
Baking soda is a must for tenderizing the beef a little...my question is what pot do you guys use for cooking rice noodles this way? I have to use a good non-stick pan to get it right because otherwise it "sticks" too much and I end up breaking the noodles into tiny pieces which is no go :/
I, too, use a non-stick pan (flat bottom) with an induction burner. Though years ago I had a beloved non-coated round bottom steel wok that I used with an old fashion electric coil burner which was curved for round woks. This work very well too. The round wok was so fabulously great at keeping things moving. Flat bottom woks, not so much. Also, I found generously lubricating with OIL when cooking is necessary with something that's not non-stick and I think that's unavoidable. Hell, I see guys like Jamie Oliver say "oh and put in a splash of oil", then proceed to seemingly empty have the bottle in the pan!
Deal Addict
Feb 4, 2010
3674 posts
2469 upvotes
Dragon120 wrote: It’s beef broth with noodles - a Vietnamese cuisine.
UrbanPoet wrote: Growing up in a Vietnamese/Chinese house hold... we never put basil or sliced onions in our pho.
It was always green onions, cilantro, mint from the garden.
Slight regional difference perhaps. My parents were from the far north. So North, there was a foot bridge to China.

My parents knew the board guard by name.
It cost a pack of cigarettes to cross the bridge. Not sure if they were joking when they told me that story about the cigarettes...
But he made sure no one stole your shit. He was a local cop or something.
I bought some beef bones from a local farmer. Would appreciate some recipes, pho or otherwise. I got some mint in the garden but I wasn't planning to make this until the weather is cooler. I usually freeze some mint though for tea.
Before responding to someone (online or offline) ask yourself: is it true? is it helpful? is it kind? is it necessary? This comes from an old Sufi adage that is so relevant today.
Jr. Member
May 29, 2017
124 posts
20 upvotes
-=phelan=- wrote: Made some x.o. sauced beef ho fun the other day. Tasted good for home made but missing that "wok hei" you'd get from a actual restaurant.
What brand of x.o. sauce do you use?
Jr. Member
May 29, 2017
124 posts
20 upvotes
anatman wrote: Super simple, but super delicious. The pan gravy from this was out of this world, so I felt compelled to make some poutine as an extra side.

Image


The chicken looks really nice, garlic chicken?
Member
User avatar
Jul 15, 2009
457 posts
910 upvotes
Toronto
sharkhead wrote: The chicken looks really nice, garlic chicken?
Thanks. Think I just did a salt and pepper rub and massaged with olive oil and herbs. I did have a lot of garlic that I needed to use up, so I might have used some on the chicken too. I do remember that I stuffed the bird with a ton of peeled garlic cloves. Afterwards I mashed those garlic cloves, which were melting soft with bird juices, into the gravy--which is probably what made the gravy so damn good.

Anyway, a farewell sourdough pizza for the end of fresh backyard basil season (finally remembered to take a shot of the crust):

Image

I also made a lot of pesto sauce with the basil (and parsley) harvest. I'm already planning to make pesto pasta with garlic butter shrimp, but could use some more ideas on what to do with the pesto sauce.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Aug 16, 2010
6348 posts
3255 upvotes
Aurora
Turnip Cake aka Radish Cake aka Lo Bak Go aka 蘿蔔糕
Wife said she needed a dim sum fix so I made this yesterday to chill in the fridge, then pan fried today for lunch.

Steamed white radish, Chinese sausages, shiitake mushrooms, green onion.
Image
.
20200912_161122.jpg
20200913_122014.jpg
Last edited by DiceMan on Sep 13th, 2020 4:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Top