Pets

What's going on with dog/puppy prices?

  • Last Updated:
  • Nov 3rd, 2020 5:14 pm
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[OP]
Deal Addict
Jul 6, 2005
3855 posts
1258 upvotes
Toronto

What's going on with dog/puppy prices?

I'm not sure what's going on, but it seems like dog prices have exploded in the past few years? At an exponential rate far beyond inflation.

For instance, back in 1997 we bought a pure-bread Chihuahua puppy for $400, and in 2010 we bought a Miniature Schnauzer/Yorkie Mix "Schnorkie" puppy (was considered a designer breed at the time) for $600.... and she came microchipped, with a crate, bag of food, a toy and shots from the breeder.

Looking around online nowadays and it seems the going rate for most dogs is no less than $2,000.... going upwards to $6,000..... WAT?! I also heard through a friend of that a breeder of Labrador Retrievers that flunked out of "puppy school" for personal assistant dogs, going for $24,000. GTFOH!

Even mangie-looking rescue dogs from Mexico (Dibs Rescue, in particular) are going for $750. Meanwhile, my friend in San Diego bought an Alaskan Malamute (Husky) puppy from the local shelter for $5.... FIVE DOLLARS!

What am I missing here.... are these just asking prices and there is an expectation to negotiate with the seller/breeder to a much lower price? My last two dogs, the asking price was the sale price, as they seemed completely reasonable, I wouldn't have thought to offer a lower price.

I'm currently looking at breeds like: Mini Aussie Shepherd, Vizsla, Weimeriner (sp?), Staff Shepherd and the prices are astronomical. I cam across another Schnorkie breeder in Barrie and they were asking $1,600?!

Are people really paying these prices for dogs? I don't think this has anything to do with the COVID pandemic, because I've been noticing these prices last year as well.
12 replies
Sr. Member
Nov 6, 2014
702 posts
1075 upvotes
Woodbridge, ON
Supply and demand. If more people want a puppy, breaders will raise price. If they can't get rid of them...price goes down. If the market bears the high price, consumers will purchase. No different than inflated house bubble. But yes, during these "stay at home" or lock down Covid times, people want a fun companion. Watch...when this is over and people have to go back to work, it'll be sad at the volume of people that will "need" to give up their dog.
Newbie
Mar 31, 2017
60 posts
30 upvotes
Reputable breeders who care about their dogs will not negotiate in price as they have continuous waiting lists for their dogs even before covid. It's important to look for a reputable breeder to ensure they're not overbreeding their dogs and they take good care of the puppies. A lot of them don't work or have full time jobs because they're busy with taking care of their dogs and pups. These breeders operate on word of mouth and require you to meet with them before you can even put a deposit down.

I've had 3 pure bred yorkies all purchased for $2,000 each. First one was purchased in 2007, second in 2008 and the most recent in summer 2019. I was actually surprised there was no price increase over the 12 year time period (2019 pup was from a different breeder). Personally I would not even consider buying from a breeder who didn't ask me to come by to understand what my commitments from a personal and work perspective are no matter how little they charged for the dog since it's a sign they don't really care where the dog is placed. When looking for breeders I found the cheaper ones would just respond to my requests saying they have a dog available and to sign a contract without asking ANYTHING about me or my family or even allowing us to do a home visit. My breeder doesn't need to but she still texts me asking how the dog is and to see pics and videos. Pre covid she was even suggesting that I bring my pup back if we were both available so she could see the pup again and allow my dog to play with her parents for a couple of hours.

Before deciding on getting my Yorkie last year, I was considering getting a Coton du Tulear. This is not a well known breed so there are limited breeders to choose from. The only breeder within a decent distance where I could visit was in Brampton and it was $3,000 for the dog. I decided on another Yorkie because I have a soft spot for them. Considering getting a second dog next year and it will likely be a Coton.
Deal Addict
Jan 28, 2014
3383 posts
635 upvotes
fordmaple wrote: Supply and demand. If more people want a puppy, breaders will raise price. If they can't get rid of them...price goes down. If the market bears the high price, consumers will purchase. No different than inflated house bubble. But yes, during these "stay at home" or lock down Covid times, people want a fun companion. Watch...when this is over and people have to go back to work, it'll be sad at the volume of people that will "need" to give up their dog.
I too worry about the pets that will suddenly "need" to be given up when the virus is over. All of a sudden someone will be allergic, or it isn't fair to the dog to be left alone etc.
Deal Fanatic
May 14, 2009
6420 posts
1217 upvotes
I’m curious how a fee of $750 for a rescue is considered expensive. We adopted a rescue in August and the adoption fee was a bit shy of $700. The dog was neutered, microchipped, and vetted (exam, DA2PP, rabies, lepto) prior to adoption. The dog was also fostered for just over a month prior to us adopting him. To me, the cost didn’t matter much but we still found it to be a good value, considering what we’d pay out of pocket for a dog + neutering + microchip + vaccines.
Newbie
User avatar
Jan 1, 2013
91 posts
95 upvotes
Ontario
Its insane right now.

Look to adopt from a rescue, humane society or consider adopting from an organization that rescues strays from Dominican Republic or Mexico etc. (https://www.facebook.com/groups/dogsandcatsDR/)

Those are the only options that have kept their adoption prices the same.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jul 9, 2012
1816 posts
297 upvotes
Pluto
I paid $1600 for my Pom 10 years ago, and went through a “show quality breeder”. Tbh my dog has a tonnnn of health problems. Anyways I got curious and checked out their site a lil while ago, and now the same “pet quality” pups are being sold for $3800. Like wtf.
Member
Sep 15, 2017
471 posts
442 upvotes
Saskatoon
You'd lose your mind over a quality Doberman Pinscher apparently, $3-4000 easily.
Sr. Member
Jul 31, 2017
667 posts
278 upvotes
I paid $3000 for my purebred Welsh Terrier 2 1/2 years ago. Granted they are pretty rare so that helps explain it.

And yeah, he was worth every penny.
Deal Addict
Dec 23, 2015
1318 posts
1797 upvotes
I never paid more than $500 adoption fee for a dog , I guess because I wasn't looking for a designer dog.
Jr. Member
Feb 14, 2015
129 posts
39 upvotes
Mississauga, ON
Yes, supply and demand. There are no available dogs at the shelter even. Breeders have a line-up never seen before. pet store, vet clinics, groomers, making $$$.
But once covid is over, there be many dogs available.
Here's an article -Year of the dog: Pandemic puppies in high demand, short supply https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.cbc.ca/amp/1.5778956

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