Investing

What's in your BORING portfolio?

  • Last Updated:
  • Jun 24th, 2021 9:54 pm
Tags:
Sr. Member
Jun 2, 2020
698 posts
656 upvotes
V5y1v1
Janus2faced wrote: in 2 pages you'll see many that are 'not so boring', but really, do you want boring, exciting or just want to follow the crowd?

what people have posted may not be long term holds, they may rotate many of their positions several times a year or over the course of years.

I have a total of 3 positions across all accounts.

my long term holds for the past 11 years are just two, SBC & TQQQ, there isn't anything else in my portfolio other than one single position

my 2021 current single position is MARA with a long bolted on cc option expiry date Dec 2021
This is simple but I would not call it boring - heck of a ride.
Sr. Member
Dec 8, 2020
762 posts
808 upvotes
Toronto
PaddyM77101 wrote: This is simple but I would not call it boring - heck of a ride.
indeed when you look back, yet TQQQ has split a total combined 96x since my first entry back in summer 2010

https://www.splithistory.com/tqqq/

SBC is a simple income generator (we all love Canadian banks)

my long term holds are boring because I still hold them

the not so boring is my single (2 max) yearly swing trades that I rotate one at a time
forgive the grammar, typos & verbose ramblings. If this bothers you, then don't read my posts, but If you can get past this, then my nonsensical posts could have some value.
[OP]
Deal Guru
Dec 5, 2006
10851 posts
5837 upvotes
Markham
Janus2faced wrote: indeed when you look back, yet TQQQ has split a total combined 96x since my first entry back in summer 2010

https://www.splithistory.com/tqqq/

SBC is a simple income generator (we all love Canadian banks)

my long term holds are boring because I still hold them

the not so boring is my single (2 max) yearly swing trades that I rotate one at a time
SBC seems similar with RBC's RBNK
Sr. Member
Jun 2, 2020
698 posts
656 upvotes
V5y1v1
smartie wrote: SBC seems similar with RBC's RBNK
Nope - SBC is a split share (with the preferred SBC.PR.A) and uses covered calls to increase yield. It is also not an ETF. The only thing that is similar about them is that they both hold the major Canadian banks. SBC is slot closer to DFN, LBS or BK than anything else.
Newbie
May 16, 2021
7 posts
4 upvotes
ENB and RSI are hands down the most boring securities in my portfolio, it's like watching paint dry. RY and SU are also boring.
Sr. Member
Dec 8, 2020
762 posts
808 upvotes
Toronto
smartie wrote: SBC seems similar with RBC's RBNK
^^^ it does & is similar to BK

I prefer SBC it's been around since 2005 has seen many volatile period years

for a stable 5% the split share preferred's are OK
forgive the grammar, typos & verbose ramblings. If this bothers you, then don't read my posts, but If you can get past this, then my nonsensical posts could have some value.
Sr. Member
Nov 28, 2016
521 posts
588 upvotes
Janus2faced wrote: ^^^ it does & is similar to BK

I prefer SBC it's been around since 2005 has seen many volatile period years

for a stable 5% the split share preferred's are OK
Are these eligible dividends?
Deal Addict
Dec 6, 2017
1246 posts
733 upvotes
Manitoba
VGRO through and through... Grinning Face With Smiling Eyes

...also have TD E-series on deduction autopilot.
Last edited by TehRFDAnomaly on Jun 1st, 2021 2:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.
[OP]
Deal Guru
Dec 5, 2006
10851 posts
5837 upvotes
Markham
UrbanPoet wrote: A huge chunk of my portfolio is in BMO. But thats mainly due to me maxing out my esop which is 6% of my salary matched 50%

But it is a good ‘boring stock’.
Pays a good dividend that increases every year. Steady gains.
Matching 50% bank stocks is quite generous. Especially if you stay there long enough. Also since it's regular contribution, it average out the cost
Deal Expert
User avatar
Jan 27, 2004
46923 posts
10086 upvotes
T.O. Lotto Captain
smartie wrote: Matching 50% bank stocks is quite generous. Especially if you stay there long enough. Also since it's regular contribution, it average out the cost
Yep... Its one of my tricks to saving. It gets deducted off my pay check so I don't even notice its gone. I also have a wealth simple automatic deduction that comes out whenever my payroll deposit is. It goes into a growth portfolio. so far its a 10% return since March 2020.
I just spend my entire pay check on life, and pretend like these deductions don't exist.
Dumb way to trick myself into savings. I always recommend automatic deductions every pay check to anyone who ask for savings/investment tips.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 4, 2014
3624 posts
4060 upvotes
Toronto, ON
smartie wrote: Matching 50% bank stocks is quite generous. Especially if you stay there long enough. Also since it's regular contribution, it average out the cost
Yeah that’s what I thought when I left Scotiabank last January and decided to transfer accumulated over 2+ years shares in kind to my DIY accounts. My average cost was ~$74. I regretted not selling for most of last year (when it plunged so low that I was “losing” more than company matched portion!) - but now back to waiting to sell @$85.. Face With Tears Of Joy
Sr. Member
Dec 8, 2020
762 posts
808 upvotes
Toronto
devmaster8 wrote: Are these eligible dividends?
good question.

in the following link 3/4 way down the page click on distributions tab to also see the tax information

https://www.bromptongroup.com/product/b ... banc-corp/

.
Last edited by Janus2faced on Jun 1st, 2021 2:32 pm, edited 2 times in total.
forgive the grammar, typos & verbose ramblings. If this bothers you, then don't read my posts, but If you can get past this, then my nonsensical posts could have some value.
[OP]
Deal Guru
Dec 5, 2006
10851 posts
5837 upvotes
Markham
UrbanPoet wrote: Yep... Its one of my tricks to saving. It gets deducted off my pay check so I don't even notice its gone. I also have a wealth simple automatic deduction that comes out whenever my payroll deposit is. It goes into a growth portfolio. so far its a 10% return since March 2020.
I just spend my entire pay check on life, and pretend like these deductions don't exist.
Dumb way to trick myself into savings. I always recommend automatic deductions every pay check to anyone who ask for savings/investment tips.
I hope when you discussed your finance with your wife, you didn't pretend those deductions didn't exist lol
Deal Addict
Jul 8, 2013
1995 posts
2744 upvotes
Red Deer, AB
freilona wrote: Current target asset allocation is 70% equities/30% fixed income. Thanks to wealthica, it’s easy to see that we’re pretty much on target and well diversified. But “All Time P&L” could me misleading as some holdings have been there for years while others were recent additions. But oh well, at least some comparison between mostly boring and a bit of fun stuff :)

Allocations across accounts:

RRSPs:
ARKK, BHK, VTI, XEF, ZPR, ZRE, GICs, individual stocks & bonds
TFSAs: VFV, ZCN, ZGQ, ZPR
Taxable: HISA, HXS, VCE, ZWU, Individual stocks
Wow, very comprehensive and quite a bit more complicated than I had originally thought!

My unsolicited advice: you only need VEQT, VAB, and a HISA (possibly a GIC ladder as well). Allocation amongst these 3 or 4 is dependent upon your risk profile, your time horizon, and risk tolerance.

That is it.

With that said, I'd be curious to see if you were able to get an additional Alpha with your current stock portfolio than if you were to go with the simple VEQT and VAB which is what I recommended to you, oh, in 2015? I think at that time, I had mentioned going with VXC, VAB, and VCN but VXC and VCN can now be switched to VEQT.

Simple is a hard sell, after all. My own spouse doesn't think that a combination of VEQT and VAB is sufficient enough to outperform the vast majority of professional investors. LOL.

Funnily enough, my own portfolio now has a bit more than several dozen small individual companies (SM portfolio). Though I'm not going to fiddle much with it and just let that portfolio ride.

My core portoflio is made up of a combination of VEQT, VAB, and VXC. You can substitute with this if you like: XEQT, ZAG, and XAW.
TFSA: XAW | RRSP: VEQT + VAB | Non-Reg: Dividend-paying individual stocks (tax purposes)
Deal Addict
Jul 8, 2013
1995 posts
2744 upvotes
Red Deer, AB
Janus2faced wrote: in 2 pages you'll see many that are 'not so boring', but really, do you want boring, exciting or just want to follow the crowd?

what people have posted may not be long term holds, they may rotate many of their positions several times a year or over the course of years.

I have a total of 3 positions across all accounts.

my long term holds for the past 11 years are just two, SBC & TQQQ, there isn't anything else in my portfolio other than one single position

my 2021 current single position is MARA with a long bolted on cc option expiry date Dec 2021
Well said.

If you want boring, you go with VEQT/XEQT, or some combination of ETFs and call it a day.

Buying and holding individual stocks is not something I would consider boring. I'm with @Blubbs on this one.
TFSA: XAW | RRSP: VEQT + VAB | Non-Reg: Dividend-paying individual stocks (tax purposes)
Deal Expert
User avatar
Dec 12, 2009
21598 posts
10136 upvotes
Toronto
freilona wrote: Yeah that’s what I thought when I left Scotiabank last January and decided to transfer accumulated over 2+ years shares in kind to my DIY accounts. My average cost was ~$74. I regretted not selling for most of last year (when it plunged so low that I was “losing” more than company matched portion!) - but now back to waiting to sell @$85.. Face With Tears Of Joy
What fundamentally changes if/when BNS shares reach $85 other than dividend yield shrinks unless OSFI allow banks to resume dividend increases? My yield on cost is just under 6%. Unless that changes, I am hanging on for dear life.
Koodo $40/6GB
Public Mobile 2016 fall promo, $23/1GB, $38/5GB
Fido $0.00/4GB+tablet
Tangerine Bank, EQ Bank, Simplii
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 4, 2014
3624 posts
4060 upvotes
Toronto, ON
TuxedoBlack wrote: Wow, very comprehensive and quite a bit more complicated than I had originally thought!

My unsolicited advice: you only need VEQT, VAB, and a HISA (possibly a GIC ladder as well). Allocation amongst these 3 or 4 is dependent upon your risk profile, your time horizon, and risk tolerance.

That is it.
Well when we switched from mutual funds to ETFs 7 years ago, there was no “all-in-ones”. And after many Norbert gambits over the years to convert CAD to USD to buy VTI and what not, it didn’t seem wise to convert back to CAD to buy products with higher MERs :) But, as I always agreed with you, husband’s passive accounts, that were mostly left alone, outperformed mine every year. His RRSP was (and still is) the largest account with least additions, and its total return (book value Vs market value) is 93%! VTI is his main holding at almost 60%, never sold, just kept adding..

And even though I regret selling VTI and IEMG in my RRSP last summer, closed-end bond fund BHK that I replaced them with did definitely better than VAB, ZAG, BND and TLT, while yielding 5.5%+. Much more suitable for retirees who need to do yearly withdrawals. And never discussed as an option anywhere ;)

So while I agree with you that my never-ending experiments didn’t add much alpha (although 9.9% 5 years annual compound returns as of yesterday are better than most plain passive options), they didn’t hurt, either - and the knowledge gained will stay with me for years! Smiling Face With Open Mouth And Smiling Eyes
Deal Addict
Feb 26, 2017
2197 posts
2712 upvotes
Here is my Canadian portfolio with the position size. I consider it pretty boring and I've owned most of these stocks for over 4 years. The portfolio is focused on dividend growth and is 59% of my overall portfolio. The weighting is not even even as my largest position, BIP is 9% and my smallest CNR is .6%. A full position is about 2% and its based on a dollar amount that hasn't really changed in 5 years (I owned less stocks/etfs back then).

tse:enb 5.1%
tse:ctc.a 0.8%
tse:td 7.7%
tse:bns 4.6%
tse:cm 1.2%
tse:ry 3.4%
bam.a 6.3%
tse:cnr 0.6%
tse:cp 3.0%
tse:t 3.6%
tse:crt.un 2.2%
BIP.un 9.1%
tse:aqn 6.1%
tse:cpx 2.5%
tse:fts 1.7%
tse:cu 1.0%

The rest of my portfolio is in a BlackRock S&P Index fund (my work matching RRSP), the TD eseries (my kids RESPs), and some individual US Tech stocks, ARKK and FDX.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Aug 4, 2014
3624 posts
4060 upvotes
Toronto, ON
will888 wrote: What fundamentally changes if/when BNS shares reach $85 other than dividend yield shrinks unless OSFI allow banks to resume dividend increases? My yield on cost is just under 6%. Unless that changes, I am hanging on for dear life.
$85 was just the sell price I had in mind when I transferred BNS shares last year :) It’s already too rich for me to DRIP (as in, don’t want to be adding more at $78+), so I transferred 2/3rds from RRSP to RIF (from where I’ll move as cash to Joint Margin) My plan is to get rid of all remaining individual stocks in favour of ETFs. And if I’m left with only one - it’ll be BIP.UN in my LRSP (yep, I have gazillion registered accounts Face With Tears Of Joy), but not BNS (I shared my opinion about Canadian banks in general quite a few times to repeat it here.. :))

Top