Automotive

Where to buy ATP AT-205 reseal?

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  • Jul 23rd, 2021 3:07 am
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18 replies
Member
Dec 19, 2010
279 posts
34 upvotes
You can blame Scotty for its popularity, try buying directly from their website.
Sr. Member
Oct 10, 2020
883 posts
544 upvotes
Fantastical wrote: https://www.amazon.ca/AT-205-ATP-Re-Sea ... B017C5YWNQ

It has very good review.

Planning to use it on my aging rubber + pour into my engine oil spot to help with oil leak.

Everywhere seems to show OOS. Any idea where i can buy it?
"sealer" might make it worse if there are tears.

A concern is teflon. But likely not an issue.

Really old topic but I want to clarify something. Teflon has excellent resistance to Diethylene Glycol Monoethyl Ether (and practically any other chemical you could conceivably find any reason to put in vehicle fluid too).

If in doubt, consult countless chemical compatibility charts, found using search keywords like diethylene glycol monoethyl ether compatibility teflon. Hint: Teflon is more often referred to as PTFE but "teflon" will work fine to find the sites and PDFs showing excellent (highest rating possible) compatibility.


- https://bobistheoilguy.com/forums/threa ... st-2816155 ( post #13)

Rockauto is OOS too.

https://www.rockauto.com/en/parts/atp,A ... lant,18746
[OP]
Deal Addict
May 23, 2006
1145 posts
295 upvotes
Vancouver
I think you are saying it's generally fine to use on rubber unless there's tear?

Even if it is used on Teflon, that post you referenced has clarified that it is typically fine?

FYI, i plan to use it on control arm rubber bushing which is showing some wear.
the2ndme wrote: "sealer" might make it worse if there are tears.

A concern is teflon. But likely not an issue.

Really old topic but I want to clarify something. Teflon has excellent resistance to Diethylene Glycol Monoethyl Ether (and practically any other chemical you could conceivably find any reason to put in vehicle fluid too).

If in doubt, consult countless chemical compatibility charts, found using search keywords like diethylene glycol monoethyl ether compatibility teflon. Hint: Teflon is more often referred to as PTFE but "teflon" will work fine to find the sites and PDFs showing excellent (highest rating possible) compatibility.


- https://bobistheoilguy.com/forums/threa ... st-2816155 ( post #13)

Rockauto is OOS too.

https://www.rockauto.com/en/parts/atp,A ... lant,18746
Sr. Member
Oct 10, 2020
883 posts
544 upvotes
Fantastical wrote: I think you are saying it's generally fine to use on rubber unless there's tear?

Even if it is used on Teflon, that post you referenced has clarified that it is typically fine?

FYI, i plan to use it on control arm rubber bushing which is showing some wear.
Yes and yes.

natural "rubber" ( polyisoprene ) and diethylene glycol are compatible but not "polyurethane" (sure your bushings are rubber?)
https://www.minorrubber.com/compatibility-chart.html

diethylene glycol and teflon ( PTFE) are compatible.
https://www.coleparmer.com/chemical-resistance

I am using it in my engine for a few months now and it did not make anything worse (for the better so far).
[OP]
Deal Addict
May 23, 2006
1145 posts
295 upvotes
Vancouver
It is a bit too technical for me.

Anyway, my vehicle is a 2005 lexus RX330. I plan to spray some ATP AT-205 into the front lower control arm bushing as it is showing some wear.

I think it should help. Worst case is it just won't work?
the2ndme wrote: Yes and yes.

natural "rubber" ( polyisoprene ) and diethylene glycol are compatible but not "polyurethane" (sure your bushings are rubber?)
https://www.minorrubber.com/compatibility-chart.html

diethylene glycol and teflon ( PTFE) are compatible.
https://www.coleparmer.com/chemical-resistance

I am using it in my engine for a few months now and it did not make anything worse (for the better so far).
Sr. Member
Oct 10, 2020
883 posts
544 upvotes
Fantastical wrote: It is a bit too technical for me.

Anyway, my vehicle is a 2005 lexus RX330. I plan to spray some ATP AT-205 into the front lower control arm bushing as it is showing some wear.

I think it should help. Worst case is it just won't work?

I would not use it on "polyurethane" bushings ( usually aftermarket ). I think most OEM bushings are rubber.

Worst case might be worst. What if part of the rubber remains harder for example ( it's going to start tearing) ?
Sr. Member
Apr 5, 2010
906 posts
173 upvotes
AT-205 is a plasticizer. It will not help on bushings as the wear is front force of the control arm bolts and bumps. You're wasting your money if you put it on bushings. Your bushing will deteriorate even at a faster speed because it has gotten more flexible and far softer. You equivalently will melt your bushing as the force from the control arm bolt will push it til it contacts the frame.

It will help plump up oil seals and re-plasticize and increase flexibility in all the seals that have had tens of thousands of heat cycles by now. Polymers over time leave the plastic especially over UV and heat. Gaskets get brittle and what AT-205 does is make them flexible again. Don't expect a miracle.

No way am I putting this stuff in my engine, steering rack, or trans on my 20-30 year old Toyotas. If theres a leak, I'm buying an OEM gasket for $1-20 and putting it in.
[OP]
Deal Addict
May 23, 2006
1145 posts
295 upvotes
Vancouver
But Scotty said AT-205 is supposed to be good for control arm bushings?



iHop wrote: AT-205 is a plasticizer. It will not help on bushings as the wear is front force of the control arm bolts and bumps. You're wasting your money if you put it on bushings. Your bushing will deteriorate even at a faster speed because it has gotten more flexible and far softer. You equivalently will melt your bushing as the force from the control arm bolt will push it til it contacts the frame.

It will help plump up oil seals and re-plasticize and increase flexibility in all the seals that have had tens of thousands of heat cycles by now. Polymers over time leave the plastic especially over UV and heat. Gaskets get brittle and what AT-205 does is make them flexible again. Don't expect a miracle.

No way am I putting this stuff in my engine, steering rack, or trans on my 20-30 year old Toyotas. If theres a leak, I'm buying an OEM gasket for $1-20 and putting it in.
Sr. Member
Apr 5, 2010
906 posts
173 upvotes
Image

Where on the bottle does it say to spray this externally all over rubber parts like bushings and boots?

No where. Stuff is only meant to be mixed with ps fluid, at, and engine oil.

For exterior window trim and door seals, I use silicon spray.
[OP]
Deal Addict
May 23, 2006
1145 posts
295 upvotes
Vancouver
See below, it's on their website that AT-205 can be used on rubber-based suspension bushings. It's also on a few videos on YouTube that you can spray onto rubber-based materials in your vehicle.

Use a plasticizer to make the rubber more flexible may make it less likely to crack?

"AT-205 can also be used to restore any hardened rubber based item, such as sunroof seals or suspension bushings.. N"


https://atpautomotive.com/news/atp-auto ... -at-aapex/
iHop wrote: Image

Where on the bottle does it say to spray this externally all over rubber parts like bushings and boots?

No where. Stuff is only meant to be mixed with ps fluid, at, and engine oil.

For exterior window trim and door seals, I use silicon spray.
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2007
3645 posts
1188 upvotes
Edmonton
Fantastical wrote:
Bla
You seem dead set on using snake oil/miracle in a bottle. Just cause someone on youtube said it.....

Why not so the right thing and replace it? The bushing is like $15

Rare hard to find bushings you can get from febest

Fix it properly and don't worry about it for another 15 years
warming up the earth 1 gas fill-up at a time...
You only live once, get a v8
[OP]
Deal Addict
May 23, 2006
1145 posts
295 upvotes
Vancouver
The setup of my 2005 Lexus RX330 makes it a pain to replace the control arm or bushing.

It costs $1k + and close to $2k

Given the age of the vehicle and worst that might happen is to make the control arm worse, I think it make sense to try the AT-205 first? if it fails, then replace control arm.
tmkf_patryk wrote: You seem dead set on using snake oil/miracle in a bottle. Just cause someone on youtube said it.....

Why not so the right thing and replace it? The bushing is like $15

Rare hard to find bushings you can get from febest

Fix it properly and don't worry about it for another 15 years
Sr. Member
Oct 10, 2020
883 posts
544 upvotes
tmkf_patryk wrote: You seem dead set on using snake oil/miracle in a bottle. Just cause someone on youtube said it.....

Why not so the right thing and replace it? The bushing is like $15

Rare hard to find bushings you can get from febest

Fix it properly and don't worry about it for another 15 years
Cost of replacing is expensive ( and in pair ).

It's a 16 year old vehicle.

OP should just leave the bushings alone.
Sr. Member
Oct 10, 2020
883 posts
544 upvotes
Fantastical wrote: The setup of my 2005 Lexus RX330 makes it a pain to replace the control arm or bushing.

It costs $1k + and close to $2k

Given the age of the vehicle and worst that might happen is to make the control arm worse, I think it make sense to try the AT-205 first? if it fails, then replace control arm.
No. Better not try anything. The bushing might still be good for a few more years with wears.

Is the bushing making noise and having an impact on handling?
[OP]
Deal Addict
May 23, 2006
1145 posts
295 upvotes
Vancouver
No noise. No impact on handling.

But my mechanic said it is showing some wear and shouldn't be an issue for at least another 2 years. This isn't surprising considering it's a 16 years old vehicle.

It's just a preventive maintenance.....i am getting different advices. Some (see below and Scotty on YouTube) said it's a good idea to add some polyurethane (e.g. AT-205) to rubber bushing on control arm......my mechanics also said he's not sure whether it will work. I am torn.

2004-lexus-rx-330-front-left-right-lowe ... g-2475428/
the2ndme wrote: No. Better not try anything. The bushing might still be good for a few more years with wears.

Is the bushing making noise and having an impact on handling?
Deal Expert
User avatar
Jun 12, 2007
16604 posts
5221 upvotes
London
Fantastical wrote: No noise. No impact on handling.

But my mechanic said it is showing some wear and shouldn't be an issue for at least another 2 years. This isn't surprising considering it's a 16 years old vehicle.

It's just a preventive maintenance.....i am getting different advices. Some (see below and Scotty on YouTube) said it's a good idea to add some polyurethane (e.g. AT-205) to rubber bushing on control arm......my mechanics also said he's not sure whether it will work. I am torn.

https://forums.redflagdeals.com/2004-le ... g-2475428/
In the other thread, adding polyurethane to a bushing is *not* spraying ATP205.
It means injecting window weld into the bushing

Sr. Member
Oct 10, 2020
883 posts
544 upvotes
Fantastical wrote: No noise. No impact on handling.

But my mechanic said it is showing some wear and shouldn't be an issue for at least another 2 years. This isn't surprising considering it's a 16 years old vehicle.

It's just a preventive maintenance.....i am getting different advices. Some (see below and Scotty on YouTube) said it's a good idea to add some polyurethane (e.g. AT-205) to rubber bushing on control arm......my mechanics also said he's not sure whether it will work. I am torn.

https://forums.redflagdeals.com/2004-le ... g-2475428/
Don't mess with it is the best option. I think Scotty also meant to imply using the at-205 on unworn bushings to prevent tearing.

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