Food & Drink

Where can I buy yeast in large quantity?

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[OP]
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Dec 4, 2010
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Where can I buy yeast in large quantity?

I’ve only ever seen them in the jar or packets. Looking at YouTube a lot of people have small tub sizes and they freeze them. Are they “fresh” yeast as oppose to the kind you need to activate with warm water and sugar? I’ve been baking a lot as I’m sure others are as well given the circumstances.

Is there differences? I can’t imagine bakery shops use the same kind we do at home.

Would a bakery shop sell me some? What would be the fair price?


Thanks
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Nov 9, 2003
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Grimsby
Punjab International on the opposite corner to Eastgate Mall in Stoney Creek has it in bulk - or did do a while back.

I bought some bulk yeast but the shelf life is aoout a year I discovered when my bread failed to live up to expectations. Now I buy the jars quite happily.
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Sep 16, 2004
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Costco carries red star brand. 2 lbs will last a while.
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May 21, 2015
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Bulk Barn usually carries the 1 lb packs but were sold out last I checked at our store..
You can freeze yeast for years.. Just put enough in a jar for a month, make sure it seals well and keep that refrigerated and put the rest in the freezer, refilling your jar as needed.

Instant, Rapid Rise, Pizza and Bread Machine yeast are all the same. They are smaller granules than Active Dry so they dissolve faster meaning they can be mixed into the flour rather than having to put them in warm water first to start proofing. You can interchange any of them with any other .
[OP]
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Beneful1 wrote: Bulk Barn usually carries the 1 lb packs but were sold out last I checked at our store..
You can freeze yeast for years.. Just put enough in a jar for a month, make sure it seals well and keep that refrigerated and put the rest in the freezer, refilling your jar as needed.

Instant, Rapid Rise, Pizza and Bread Machine yeast are all the same. They are smaller granules than Active Dry so they dissolve faster meaning they can be mixed into the flour rather than having to put them in warm water first to start proofing. You can interchange any of them with any other .
I just learned rising flour is just Ap with baking powder and salt.

Lots of recipes out there to try without the use of yeast.

I want to bake more breads and pastries. Made some puff pastries with luke warm results but hey, trial and error. Butter is expensive though so it can be an expensive endeavour.
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Grimsby
Supercooled wrote: I just learned rising flour is just Ap with baking powder and salt.

Lots of recipes out there to try without the use of yeast.

I want to bake more breads and pastries. Made some puff pastries with luke warm results but hey, trial and error. Butter is expensive though so it can be an expensive endeavour.
I always had trouble with puff pastry but this week I tried a recipe using yoghurt and it was amazingly good. Plenty of choices online. Uses half the normal amount of butter.

Edit:- Sorry I used sour cream - but there are recipes for yughurt too
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May 28, 2012
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Saskatoon
I buy the big brick from Costco and vac seal in half cup amounts. I find it stays fresh longer than in the original bag. Some people freeze their yeast. A bakery would probably sell you fresh yeast in a pound block. I have always used dried yeast so don't know if it keeps for a long time or if it can be frozen.

If you want to try something different, make a sourdough starter. It's dead easy and you can use it for a lot more than just bread.
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May 21, 2015
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Try making some cream puff/ eclair pastry dough (choux). It is surprisngly simple to do compared to puff pastry. . Slice them in half and make breakfast croisant sandwiches with egg etc..

Owbist wrote: I always had trouble with puff pastry but this week I tried a recipe using yoghurt and it was amazingly good. Plenty of choices online. Uses half the normal amount of butter.

Edit:- Sorry I used sour cream - but there are recipes for yughurt too
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Aug 22, 2014
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Mars2012 wrote: If you want to try something different, make a sourdough starter. It's dead easy and you can use it for a lot more than just bread.
Another vote for sourdough starter. Personally it took me a few attempts to get it going, but once it was active it's been a breeze to maintain.
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Jun 13, 2009
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Supercooled wrote: I’ve only ever seen them in the jar or packets. Looking at YouTube a lot of people have small tub sizes and they freeze them. Are they “fresh” yeast as oppose to the kind you need to activate with warm water and sugar? I’ve been baking a lot as I’m sure others are as well given the circumstances.

Is there differences? I can’t imagine bakery shops use the same kind we do at home.

Would a bakery shop sell me some? What would be the fair price?


Thanks
Yes, ask your local bakery if they sell fresh yeast. It has to be refrigerated, so it isn't usually out on the floor. I got mine from the San Remo bakery. They have it out on the deli side ($1 for 100g) in the fridge; however they are closed until further notice. FYI: I find it is difficult to store, and usually not any good after a month in the freezer. Though I have never vac sealed it as some have suggested. Might be better to stick with instant yeast.
[OP]
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Dec 4, 2010
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Ive watched a few videos on sour dough. Seems like a very eco friendly way as it’s just water and flour allowed to capture microbes in the air. As one you tuber said, we have yeast all around us.

Am I the only one who didn’t know this? The whole homesteading movement is very enlightening. I hope these tough times will force people to be more self reliant and as well as our government to be more focused on home grown businesses.
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This is the one I've been using. There's yeast in flour too.

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/233/wi ... gh-starter
Supercooled wrote: we have yeast all around us.
Trouble is yeast all have different characteristics and can impart different tastes. My initial bread made from above had a nice sourdough taste at first but it would appear the yeast strained gradually changed so it lost the sour flavour.

Some modern wineries used to practice wild yeast fermentation (just crush the grapes and leave the juice & skins to ferment in open vats). I imagine it was a surprise each time what the wine tasted like.

Had a Spanish doctoral student stay in my basement suite a decade ago. He was studying and sampling the yeast at UBC's wine research institute.
Cream rises to the top. So does scum.
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Markham
thriftshopper wrote: This is the one I've been using. There's yeast in flour too.

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/node/233/wi ... gh-starter



Trouble is yeast all have different characteristics and can impart different tastes. My initial bread made from above had a nice sourdough taste at first but it would appear the yeast strained gradually changed so it lost the sour flavour.

Some modern wineries used to practice wild yeast fermentation (just crush the grapes and leave the juice & skins to ferment in open vats). I imagine it was a surprise each time what the wine tasted like.

Had a Spanish doctoral student stay in my basement suite a decade ago. He was studying and sampling the yeast at UBC's wine research institute.
Just flour and water and patience.

Pics of a sourdough loaf baked today. Can u smell the SOURDOUGH from the pic?
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We're all bozos on the bus until we find a way to express ourselves...

Failure is always an option...just not the preferred one!
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May 28, 2012
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Saskatoon
Supercooled wrote: Ive watched a few videos on sour dough. Seems like a very eco friendly way as it’s just water and flour allowed to capture microbes in the air. As one you tuber said, we have yeast all around us.

Am I the only one who didn’t know this? The whole homesteading movement is very enlightening. I hope these tough times will force people to be more self reliant and as well as our government to be more focused on home grown businesses.
The yeast is present in the flour, it's a myth that it comes from the air. If you have a go at it, make sure to use unbleached flour. I have two starters, one with unbleached flour and the other with 50-50 rye and unbleached. There are a lot of online sources to get started. It takes at least a week and gets better and stronger with time.
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gr8dlr wrote: Just flour and water and patience.

Pics of a sourdough loaf baked today. Can u smell the SOURDOUGH from the pic?
Don't mean to hijack this thread but I'm going to need some details here because that is a beautiful crumb shot.
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gr8dlr wrote: Just flour and water and patience.

Pics of a sourdough loaf baked today. Can u smell the SOURDOUGH from the pic?
Have 3 starters on the go.

New one started 3 days ago, another one inoculated with my first starter, and the original which I thought was mostly dead but seems to be coming back to life.

What's more I bought a barely-used flour mill from a local farm (too low volume for their intended use) delivered today. Came with 20 g of wheat berries.
20200403_232011628_iOS.jpg
Sourdough with fresh-ground flour tomorrow!
Cream rises to the top. So does scum.
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Supercooled wrote: Ive watched a few videos on sour dough. Seems like a very eco friendly way as it’s just water and flour allowed to capture microbes in the air. As one you tuber said, we have yeast all around us.

Am I the only one who didn’t know this? The whole homesteading movement is very enlightening. I hope these tough times will force people to be more self reliant and as well as our government to be more focused on home grown businesses.
Agree, and it is much better than dry yeast.
[OP]
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Dec 4, 2010
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I haven’t seen any YouTube video demonstrate this but how much do you use of the starter to bake say a 12” pizza? How much starter is considered 1 teaspoon of dry yeast?

This guys channel is very entertaining.

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Supercooled wrote: I haven’t seen any YouTube video demonstrate this but how much do you use of the starter to bake say a 12” pizza? How much starter is considered 1 teaspoon of dry yeast?

This guys channel is very entertaining.

Thread has slowly moved to a sourdough lesson.

I've just recently started using some rules of thumb for my bread making

1 part starter, 2 parts water, 3 parts flour, 1/2 tsp of salt per 100g of flour

For me...I roughly eyeball a boule ie round loaf of bread

150g starter (looks like one cup if it's risen like in that picture)
300g water ( or roughly 1/4 cup x 5)
450g flour (this is 3 cups)

Bread making is forgiving, little more or less hydration (ie water/flour percentage ratio) is OK. The higher the hydration (watery dough) the harder it is to work with until you gain some "feels".

Above "recipe" is 71.4% hydration ( 150g starter is 75g flour, 75g water => 375 g water / 525 g flour => 71.4%

70% is a good number to start with...as you get more comfortable, you can increase hydration.

My technique is more of a combination of techniques. Joshua is really good but I found that method a bit laborious.

I found this video recently and really like her coil folding in a food container technique. I don't do "laminations" where she spreads out dough and folds it all up.



My technique right now

starter, water, flour, combine well using hand or spatula. Sit 1 hour or more to autolyze
add salt along with a Tbl or two of water, work it in (pincher method or folds)
coil folds every 30 mins (maybe 4 or five)
fast preshape, rest 10 min
final shape, flour and put into my banneton (or towelled bowl)
Into the fridge to be baked next day.
Next day, out of fridge, check to see if adequately proofed. if not, leave it out and wait
Bake, wait till cool, slice, eat.
We're all bozos on the bus until we find a way to express ourselves...

Failure is always an option...just not the preferred one!
[OP]
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Dec 4, 2010
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Is this ok? It’s 2 day old, today will be it’s 3rd day. I fed it once yesterday. Is that where the line break is?

It smells like malt vinegar but and from what I read that’s normal.

Can I start to use it?
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