Entrepreneurship & Small Business

Where to sell things other than on Kijiji and ebay?

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  • Jul 20th, 2020 11:00 am
[OP]
Newbie
Nov 2, 2019
35 posts
16 upvotes

Where to sell things other than on Kijiji and ebay?

Hi all,

I used to be able to sell quite a lot of used and new items on Kijiji for worthwhile prices up until about 2 years ago. But now about 95% of the enquiries I get are a waste of time. Most people offer silly prices, often 1/3 of my asking price or less, or usually just hit those auto generated question buttons and never respond to my replies. The only time I ever get an actual sale is when I reduce the price to a ridiculously low price (under 40% of the retail price for new items and less than that for items that are 2 days old and in new condition). And even then, sometimes that takes months of dealing with idiots to get one thing sold, finally. And these are fairly popular products too, not some obscure antique Elvis statue.

I don't know if this is the same in other cites but in London, things are dire in that regard, but only in recent years. I haven't used eBay since they lost me several thousand dollars by facilitating cyber robbery. Ebay Canada is essentially derelict though anyway and I'm not sure why Canadians still haven't adopted it the way the Americans and British have but it's comparatively devoid of buyers and seller, hence why the default search results are from the USA until you turn off USA results every time, which usually reveals "0 results" in Canada.

So my questions is, aside from Kijiji and Ebay, where else can things be sold? I know one obvious answer is this forum, but I have no history here and so people are highly unlikely to send me money and trust me to ship the goods. I don't know much about pawn shops but my impression is they pay very low prices, mainly to the desperate. Canada doesn't seem to do car boot sales, so that's out. Garage sales seem to be mostly for $0.50-$25 items, not for brand new or barely used $200 tech products. Facebook marketplace; I've heard the experience is much the same as Kijiji - it is the same people on there after all, so I don't really expect anything other than people who can barely write and people who low ball.

Am I overlooking any other obvious outlets?

The things I sell a lot of are: used and new tech gear, camera gear, computer stuff, grooming products, tools, sometimes the odd bit of furniture.
18 replies
Sr. Member
User avatar
Dec 21, 2015
631 posts
287 upvotes
Canada
kijiji, fb marketplace.
people are going to lowball no matter what. if and when they do, ignore. also if you want to sell stuff quick, lower your price and move on, hanging onto things you don't need because of the extra 20 bucks youre trying to make, doesnt make sense imo.

I recently sold custom computer that i build (spent 2k, used for 1.5yrs) at 1.3k. I could have hold on to it and mase extra 100 or 200 but didnt want to deal with communicating with people, and sold it to a dude who really wanted it.

You have to understand, it is a used product even if you used it for 10 hours, buyers dont give a shit how long you used the product, so dont be crying about a product you used for 2 days. why did you buy the thing that you were going to use only for 2 days? why didnt you just return it?
Deal Addict
Nov 24, 2004
4041 posts
664 upvotes
Toronto
Facebook Marketplace has stolen a lot of the "thunder" from Kijiji, around here at least.

There is an immediate "driven off the lot" value reduction that most items are subject to. Even if an item has only barely been used, buyers are taking a risk by purchasing from you vs. buying something new, where they would have the guarantees of a retail operation behind the purchase. This risk is reflected in a reduced price. Computers and electronics in particular depreciate very rapidly.

As already mentioned, there is a law of supply-and-demand behind the price-setting of any good, used electronics included. If you are only getting what you feel are low offers for your items, it could be that your price is too high for the market to bear, and / or there is simply very little demand for them in your local market.

The advantage of eBay at least is that it opens you up to sellers outside your area. (I personally stopped using eBay to sell stuff as their "commissions" started to grow ever larger over time, and their listings began to get clogged by "professionals".) And searching eBay sold listings is a good way to get an idea of what certain items are worth, even though auctions can sometimes be fudged.
[OP]
Newbie
Nov 2, 2019
35 posts
16 upvotes
FJF23J12DAZ wrote: kijiji, fb marketplace.
people are going to lowball no matter what. if and when they do, ignore. also if you want to sell stuff quick, lower your price and move on, hanging onto things you don't need because of the extra 20 bucks youre trying to make, doesnt make sense imo.

I recently sold custom computer that i build (spent 2k, used for 1.5yrs) at 1.3k. I could have hold on to it and mase extra 100 or 200 but didnt want to deal with communicating with people, and sold it to a dude who really wanted it.

You have to understand, it is a used product even if you used it for 10 hours, buyers dont give a shit how long you used the product, so dont be crying about a product you used for 2 days. why did you buy the thing that you were going to use only for 2 days? why didnt you just return it?
I appreciate you taking the time to try, but with a little less aggression and a lot fewer assumptions your post might be more helpful.

" if you want to sell stuff quick, lower your price and move on, hanging onto things you don't need because of the extra 20 bucks youre trying to make, doesnt make sense imo."

I didn't say anything about hanging on to stuff I don't need, just to try to get an extra 20 bucks, so you saying that this makes no sense is a strawman argument, which is not productive. I am talking about selling, for example, a $250 action camera of which I have 2, but only kept 1 and put the other on Kijiji for $150 labelled as brand new, sealed in the box, but people offer $60-80 and say that even $120 is too expensive. Or a product that I buy for $700, use for a month and then sell as used but in perfect condition but cannot even get $450 back for it and receive offers in the $150-300 range. I cannot even get 50% of the retail value back for items I'm selling as brand new in the box, never even opened, with a full warranty. People have incredibly high expectations now. They want a $500 item for $200 and they want me to deliver it. Most of these low ballers get ignored but the trouble is, that's just about the only type of offers that come. The people willing to pay non-ridiculous prices for good quality things are almost non-existent.

"You have to understand, it is a used product even if you used it for 10 hours, buyers dont give a shit how long you used the product, so dont be crying about a product you used for 2 days. why did you buy the thing that you were going to use only for 2 days? why didnt you just return it?"

I understand a lot more than you seem to think. I'm not crying. I did not buy the thing only to use for 2 days. These are all assumptions. I am a tech youtuber and get sent a lot of things to test or review. Some things I have to buy myself for the purposes of reviewing. I would not be able to return such an item, ethically speaking. This is my job. In some cases a company may send me one item, which I might review, and if I don't want to keep it when I'm finished, I can sell it. In other cases they may send me multiple versions, colours or varieties of a product or products, and I may end up with several unused items that are still boxed and unused. If I buy a product for the purpose of reviewing it, I would not just return it to the store for a refund because that does not sit right with me. In the past it was really easy to sell these things on Kijiji for reasonable prices and recoup more than half of my expenditure, such as a $250 camera in like new condition for $150-170. The brand new items used to sell quite easily for at least 60-70% of their retail price. But now people expect to pay 30-40% for NEW items.


And while this is happening with the crazy buyers, there are many sellers on Kijiji who are pricing their items at or above the new price. For instance, I have seen 2 people this week selling osmo pockets for $450 and $475 when they are $460 new or $399 used, like new on Amazon with a great return policy. So it's like most people on Kijiji have just gone a bit insane. The buyers won't pay more than pocket change for things while the sellers want basically almost the new price for their year old item.

The 'time spent' to 'reward' ratio is very weak on Kijiji now, at least where I am. So I came here to ask what the other options are. I haven't always lived in Ontario, and so perhaps there are other ways to sell things that I'm not aware of. Perhaps there are physical stores that buy used or new items, other than pawn shops.
Last edited by BenRedFlag on Nov 17th, 2019 7:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.
[OP]
Newbie
Nov 2, 2019
35 posts
16 upvotes
JHW wrote: Facebook Marketplace has stolen a lot of the "thunder" from Kijiji, around here at least.

There is an immediate "driven off the lot" value reduction that most items are subject to. Even if an item has only barely been used, buyers are taking a risk by purchasing from you vs. buying something new, where they would have the guarantees of a retail operation behind the purchase. This risk is reflected in a reduced price. Computers and electronics in particular depreciate very rapidly.

As already mentioned, there is a law of supply-and-demand behind the price-setting of any good, used electronics included. If you are only getting what you feel are low offers for your items, it could be that your price is too high for the market to bear, and / or there is simply very little demand for them in your local market.

The advantage of eBay at least is that it opens you up to sellers outside your area. (I personally stopped using eBay to sell stuff as their "commissions" started to grow ever larger over time, and their listings began to get clogged by "professionals".) And searching eBay sold listings is a good way to get an idea of what certain items are worth, even though auctions can sometimes be fudged.
Thanks for your well written comment. Yes I think this part in bold may be the case, as in, my city is just struggling economically now and the kind of people who buy used gear just don't have much disposable income at the moment. It doesn't really matter what I'm selling; I just don't get worthwhile offers now. As I said, I struggle to even get 50% of the retail price when selling things that are brand new in their boxes. Maybe people have all just moved to Facebook, leaving only the low ballers and chancers on Kijiji, I'm not sure. I don't use Facebook at all.

I live frugally myself, but if I was looking for something like a recently released camera, GoPro, laptop, headphones, I would be more than happy to get a new one in its box for only 50% or 60% or even 70% of the retail cost. I would bite the person's arm off to get that deal.
Deal Addict
Nov 24, 2004
4041 posts
664 upvotes
Toronto
Kiraly wrote: Nobody mentioned Craigslist? It's all anyone uses to sell used stuff around here. Kijiji is a ghost town.
It must be really regional. Here in the GTA, Craigslist was "the thing" until around 2007-2008 or so, when Kijiji started to take off and Craigslist began to fade in relevance. I stopped posting stuff on Craigslist around 2011-2012 as by then, it had become the ghost town.

But I understand that Kijiji is basically a non-entity in most of Canada and the USA. I don't know why it has captured the market so thoroughly in the Toronto area. There's got to be an interesting business-school research project in there somewhere.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Dec 21, 2015
631 posts
287 upvotes
Canada
Dude, if you're not going to listen and just look for validation why are you even here posting about it.
Yes, obviously it's a regional thing, so less demand hence you have limited option, which are people who are only willing to pay X amount which doesn't satisfy your price point.
Either sell it to them, keep it, give it to your friends or family or sell it on online via shipping options (after all the time spent sending the stuff & risking getting scammed online or damage good claims by the buyers, you're lucky to make more money than just selling it to your local ppl with cash)
There isn't any physical stores that will pay your more for your items, try pawn shops, you're lucky if they pay you 10%, let alone know what you're even trying to sell.

Again, you know you have limited options, so stop blaming about the market. The market will do whatever it feels right, either suck up and participate or don't.
Deal Fanatic
Oct 7, 2007
7458 posts
3567 upvotes
Kiraly wrote: Nobody mentioned Craigslist? It's all anyone uses to sell used stuff around here. Kijiji is a ghost town.
Craigslist Vancouver is an example of a PERFECT marketplace if you use the market definition of "perfect". If you post something rare but desirable on Craigslist Vancouver, it will be noticed faster than you can believe it. It has happened to us several times. Other times we have sold high end computers BNIB on Craigslist Vancouver and the same thing, the market was fast acting paying what we thought was absolutely fair to us. Sometimes, the customer knew more and valued the product more than we did. If you really want to know if there is a demand for something at a certain price, try posting it on Vancouver Craigslist and see what kind of response you get. I am not saying that there aren't a ton of people there that will try to give you meaningless and insulting offers, along with no-shows and time-wasters but so many years past its inception, Craigslist seems to be the defacto marketplace in the Lower Mainland. Seems like CL is something that works and while so many have tried to replicate their own version, CL continues to dominate.
Deal Guru
Aug 14, 2007
10611 posts
1812 upvotes
Toronto
BenRedFlag wrote: I appreciate you taking the time to try, but with a little less aggression and a lot fewer assumptions your post might be more helpful.

" if you want to sell stuff quick, lower your price and move on, hanging onto things you don't need because of the extra 20 bucks youre trying to make, doesnt make sense imo."

I didn't say anything about hanging on to stuff I don't need, just to try to get an extra 20 bucks, so you saying that this makes no sense is a strawman argument, which is not productive. I am talking about selling, for example, a $250 action camera of which I have 2, but only kept 1 and put the other on Kijiji for $150 labelled as brand new, sealed in the box, but people offer $60-80 and say that even $120 is too expensive. Or a product that I buy for $700, use for a month and then sell as used but in perfect condition but cannot even get $450 back for it and receive offers in the $150-300 range. I cannot even get 50% of the retail value back for items I'm selling as brand new in the box, never even opened, with a full warranty. People have incredibly high expectations now. They want a $500 item for $200 and they want me to deliver it. Most of these low ballers get ignored but the trouble is, that's just about the only type of offers that come. The people willing to pay non-ridiculous prices for good quality things are almost non-existent.

"You have to understand, it is a used product even if you used it for 10 hours, buyers dont give a shit how long you used the product, so dont be crying about a product you used for 2 days. why did you buy the thing that you were going to use only for 2 days? why didnt you just return it?"

I understand a lot more than you seem to think. I'm not crying. I did not buy the thing only to use for 2 days. These are all assumptions. I am a tech youtuber and get sent a lot of things to test or review. Some things I have to buy myself for the purposes of reviewing. I would not be able to return such an item, ethically speaking. This is my job. In some cases a company may send me one item, which I might review, and if I don't want to keep it when I'm finished, I can sell it. In other cases they may send me multiple versions, colours or varieties of a product or products, and I may end up with several unused items that are still boxed and unused. If I buy a product for the purpose of reviewing it, I would not just return it to the store for a refund because that does not sit right with me. In the past it was really easy to sell these things on Kijiji for reasonable prices and recoup more than half of my expenditure, such as a $250 camera in like new condition for $150-170. The brand new items used to sell quite easily for at least 60-70% of their retail price. But now people expect to pay 30-40% for NEW items.


And while this is happening with the crazy buyers, there are many sellers on Kijiji who are pricing their items at or above the new price. For instance, I have seen 2 people this week selling osmo pockets for $450 and $475 when they are $460 new or $399 used, like new on Amazon with a great return policy. So it's like most people on Kijiji have just gone a bit insane. The buyers won't pay more than pocket change for things while the sellers want basically almost the new price for their year old item.

The 'time spent' to 'reward' ratio is very weak on Kijiji now, at least where I am. So I came here to ask what the other options are. I haven't always lived in Ontario, and so perhaps there are other ways to sell things that I'm not aware of. Perhaps there are physical stores that buy used or new items, other than pawn shops.
Lowballers will always be around. But then you get the one off person who will literally offer exactly what you want, meet where you want and come quick. This just happened to me 3 times in a row on Kijiji. That said my price was very reasonable but I made money. Here's what happened.

Bought 2 nintendo switches and a switch lite using my pc points. I kept one, listed the others.

Nintendo switch listed for 390 (knowing it'll be 360), sold for 360 the next morning.

Switch Lite I was getting ridiculous lowball offers. Listed for 250, was getting offers for $50, $100, $180, etc. Relisted said 250 firm, any other offer will get no response. Within 2 hours someone came to me with 250.

The best one:

Bought 2 broken Ps4s. One for $40 and one for $50, one I used the hard drive from the $40 one which fixed it. That one that now had no hard drive I stripped for all of its parts. Listed them on Kijiji.

Motherboard and bluray board I sold and shipped to a guy in Brampton for $100 shipped, he then realized the power supply he had wasn't compatible this board so he then bought the power supply off me for $50 shipped.

He never haggled on the price and is actually now going to be a potential customer for soldering / smd rework if he can't do it.

The other ps4 that was fixed I am going to hold on to it for now.

Picked up another ps4 that needs a new hdmi port so once I get that in the mail and installed, as long as it all works I already have a buyer at $230, which would be about $150 profit.


In the end my point is is that if you have a set price, stick to it and wait. As long as it's reasonable a buyer will come around. Not being desperate for money helps a great deal. (not saying you or anyone else here is)
Deal Addict
Jul 21, 2009
1046 posts
480 upvotes
Toronto
Use Facebook marketplace. I usually post my ads on both Kijiji and FB marketplace and would say 8-9 times out of 10 someone from Facebook picks it up.
Deal Fanatic
Oct 7, 2007
7458 posts
3567 upvotes
Where you list something might also depend on the age of the person you think might buy it. I actually sold a high end espresso maker by listing a free ad in the local classifieds not too long ago. An older gentleman came and purchased it from me. I was surprised that anyone still reads the classifieds.
[OP]
Newbie
Nov 2, 2019
35 posts
16 upvotes
FJF23J12DAZ wrote: Dude, if you're not going to listen and just look for validation why are you even here posting about it.
Yes, obviously it's a regional thing, so less demand hence you have limited option, which are people who are only willing to pay X amount which doesn't satisfy your price point.
Either sell it to them, keep it, give it to your friends or family or sell it on online via shipping options (after all the time spent sending the stuff & risking getting scammed online or damage good claims by the buyers, you're lucky to make more money than just selling it to your local ppl with cash)
There isn't any physical stores that will pay your more for your items, try pawn shops, you're lucky if they pay you 10%, let alone know what you're even trying to sell.

Again, you know you have limited options, so stop blaming about the market. The market will do whatever it feels right, either suck up and participate or don't.
Thanks for the advice, dude. Mine to you would be: Read, then make sure you understand what you're reading, then dial the aggression wheel down a little bit and only then think about replying. Then proof read what you've written before posting. Your legibility will go way up and you will come across as less unnecessarily combative. Thanks anyway.
[OP]
Newbie
Nov 2, 2019
35 posts
16 upvotes
Thanks to everyone for their suggestions. I will look into Facebook marketplace a bit more. That seems to be the only option. All the best.
Deal Addict
Nov 23, 2008
4319 posts
1256 upvotes
Kiraly wrote: Nobody mentioned Craigslist? It's all anyone uses to sell used stuff around here. Kijiji is a ghost town.
Really? Wow, it's exactly opposite in Toronto and Ontario

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