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Whirlpool dryer blew a thermal fuse

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  • May 11th, 2020 6:09 pm
[OP]
Deal Guru
Jun 11, 2005
13126 posts
1958 upvotes
Toronto

Whirlpool dryer blew a thermal fuse

yesterday our Whirlpool dryer of 13 years blew a thermal fuse. The light inside the door still worked, but no cycle would start. I opened up the back cover, checked the exhaust for debris and replaced the thermal fuse. I also cleaned out the dryer ductwork. Everything was pretty clean. The dryer worked again and hasn't had a problem yet. I've done about 4 loads. What can be the reason why the fuse blew in the first place? We rely on the dryer to work since we need to wash our clothes very often. We work in a healthcare setting. I'm wondering whether I should get a new dryer...
7 replies
Deal Addict
Dec 19, 2009
3923 posts
1912 upvotes
trixstar wrote: yesterday our Whirlpool dryer of 13 years blew a thermal fuse. The light inside the door still worked, but no cycle would start. I opened up the back cover, checked the exhaust for debris and replaced the thermal fuse. I also cleaned out the dryer ductwork. Everything was pretty clean. The dryer worked again and hasn't had a problem yet. I've done about 4 loads. What can be the reason why the fuse blew in the first place? We rely on the dryer to work since we need to wash our clothes very often. We work in a healthcare setting. I'm wondering whether I should get a new dryer...
Dryers don't tend to wash clothes but they dry clothes ... so you can still wash them and you can still dry them by a different method like outside on a clothesline or inside on a drying rack.
Your dryer motor could be wearing out and slowing down, might need some lubrication or the belt might even be slipping.
Being in a healthcare setting you may have access to a thermometer and be able to measure the outlet exhaust temperature to see how high it is.
[OP]
Deal Guru
Jun 11, 2005
13126 posts
1958 upvotes
Toronto
pootza wrote:
Dryers don't tend to wash clothes but they dry clothes ... so you can still wash them and you can still dry them by a different method like outside on a clothesline or inside on a drying rack.
Your dryer motor could be wearing out and slowing down, might need some lubrication or the belt might even be slipping.
Being in a healthcare setting you may have access to a thermometer and be able to measure the outlet exhaust temperature to see how high it is.
Great idea. I'll check the exhaust temp with my infrared gun. If its too high, would buying a new dryer be a good idea? This was the one that came with our new house in 2008. Pretty basic dryer. The parts might be expensive if we are replacing the motor, belts, high temp, moisture sensor etc.
Sr. Member
Nov 6, 2014
736 posts
1130 upvotes
Woodbridge, ON
Thermal fuses get "tired/Brittle" they can easily fail with age and nearing it's thermal limit. If you replaced with new and same rating and it happens again, you likely have an issue warranting additional repair if cost effective or replacement. If it doesn't happen again, you're good to go.
Deal Addict
Jan 5, 2003
4272 posts
3699 upvotes
Toronto
If you're handy enough to diagnose and change the thermal fuse, you are handy enough to change the belt, motor, etc. when those need replacing, so you're saying yourself a lot of money vs. buying a new one, if you're otherwise happy with it. Whirlpools are easy to get parts for and easy to repair. Sometimes those new fancy features are "one more thing to break". I suggest you only consider getting a new one if you really need a bigger capacity.

You're in that sweet spot of having DIY skills and a very DIY-able appliance.

My darn 30 year old Amana (ie. Whirlpool) dryer inherited from the previous owner of my house refuses to die. I open it up annually to vacuum up any lint and clean the vent hose and see that the belt, etc. seem to be still in good condition. I'm always tempted to get a new one, but won't be surprised if a new one dies in two years...
Member
User avatar
May 28, 2007
398 posts
131 upvotes
Peterborough
fordmaple wrote: Thermal fuses get "tired/Brittle" they can easily fail with age and nearing it's thermal limit. If you replaced with new and same rating and it happens again, you likely have an issue warranting additional repair if cost effective or replacement. If it doesn't happen again, you're good to go.
This! Parts get old and wear out. This dryer is probably better then 3/4 of the crap they sell today. If you can repair it yourself = keep going. Lots of great videos online to fix these. I've replaced the flame sensor (similar item) in 2 gas dryers and a hot water tank. Also the thermal fuse in my furnace. Easily saved hundreds of $$ and learned alot about how stuff works.
Deal Fanatic
Mar 17, 2004
5213 posts
628 upvotes
Did you check the exhaust vent to see if there is blockage anywhere? It can cause overheating if it's partially blocked. If you don't have access to where it comes out of the building, you can use a blower or blower part of a shop vac and a plastic bag and tape to form a airtight seal then try blowing it clear
[OP]
Deal Guru
Jun 11, 2005
13126 posts
1958 upvotes
Toronto
Oni-kun wrote: Did you check the exhaust vent to see if there is blockage anywhere? It can cause overheating if it's partially blocked. If you don't have access to where it comes out of the building, you can use a blower or blower part of a shop vac and a plastic bag and tape to form a airtight seal then try blowing it clear
Yup I checked the exhaust duct work. Its an unfinished laundry room in the basement. I took all the exhaust line from the dryer to the wall vent apart and cleaned it out. It was pretty clean. I'm guessing its more of an issue with the machine. Its pretty old, but I'm happy it was pretty much problem free for over a decade.

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