Shopping Discussion

This is why I buy stuff from Amazon (and not other online retailers)

  • Last Updated:
  • Dec 6th, 2020 11:45 am
[OP]
Jr. Member
Feb 27, 2011
156 posts
130 upvotes

This is why I buy stuff from Amazon (and not other online retailers)

Ordered a board game and advent calendar for the kids on Nov 21 from Indigo's website.  Est. delivery date at time of purchase was Nov. 30.  When the invoice was issued, this ETA had moved to Dec 1.  Then, a week later, to Dec. 2.  Dec. 2 came and went, and now it is "out for delivery" on Dec. 3.

I know this is a first-world problem, and I don't want this to come across as a pile on Indigo, but to me this is a classic example of why I have defaulted to buying things on Amazon for so many years now.  Even if I can save a few bucks by browsing multiple retailers, it isn't really worth it most of the time.  Whether it's Indigo, Fossil, or Shoppers Drug Mart, it seems like our orders with non-Amazon online retailers are delivered late about 50% of the time.  And that's not even including the significant lag time already usually built into their shipping times (9 days, in the case of our Indigo order!)  With Amazon, we experience problems with maybe 2-3% of our orders.  And the fact they manage (many of) their own deliveries means they just can't/don't default to blaming Purolator, etc. for any delays.

I'm a reluctant Amazon fanboy, and I recognize for every anecdote I provide in their favour, there are probably ten horror stories that could emerge.  But their competition isn't making it any easier to consider them as alternatives.  
24 replies
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Dec 28, 2007
7957 posts
4578 upvotes
Alberta
I ordered a APC surge protector that I can’t find anywhere else on Tuesday. Amazon said expected shipping is Dec 12. I figured no problem because of all the BF/CM orders. I received an email this morning that it has shipped and expected delivery is tomorrow. :)
Administrator
User avatar
Jun 17, 2013
14740 posts
27770 upvotes
Scarborough
Very rarely has Amazon ever not hit a delivery estimate for me. When they don't, it's typically only a day late. Backordered stuff usually arrives faster than they estimate too.
RFD Staff [Forum Rules] [Facebook] [Twitter].
[OP]
Jr. Member
Feb 27, 2011
156 posts
130 upvotes
TomRFD wrote: Very rarely has Amazon ever not hit a delivery estimate for me. When they don't, it's typically only a day late. Backordered stuff usually arrives faster than they estimate too.
Yeah, Amazon is the only company I've encountered which has ever delivered an order before it's delivery window (aside from the Ikea delivery guy who one time showed up at our house three hours early, but that is another story!)

Over the years, I have had a couple items (ordered from Amazon) disappear in transit. When that happened, Amazon's CS was not actually all that great (they only offered a refund and a weak apology!) But, as mentioned, those experiences were the exception and not the rule.
Sr. Member
Aug 25, 2011
575 posts
230 upvotes
SCARBOROUGH
This holiday season is going to be tough for other retailers not named Amazon.

The shift to ecommerce is clear, but not all retailers are equipped for ecommerce. Not only do they have a bad shopping experience (like Canadian Tire), but the logistics and shipping is obviously not as robust as Amazon.

There will be even more shipping delays this December that will impact everyone including Amazon, but at least Amazon has the logistics network to hire other ad-hoc carriers more effectively.
Member
User avatar
Nov 21, 2009
396 posts
186 upvotes
Moncton
I dunno, I placed an Amazon.ca order on November 25 and it hasn't even been shipped yet. I don't think I've ever had an order take over a week just to get out the door. Also, placed an order on Amazon.com on the 30th and it also hasn't left the warehouse and their delivery estimate is Dec. 15-31st Face With Tears Of Joy Anyway, I'm in no hurry but even the mighty Amazon is not immune to demand spikes.
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2007
3487 posts
1044 upvotes
Edmonton
costaguana wrote: Ordered a board game and advent calendar for the kids on Nov 21 from Indigo's website.  Est. delivery date at time of purchase was Nov. 30.  When the invoice was issued, this ETA had moved to Dec 1.  Then, a week later, to Dec. 2.  Dec. 2 came and went, and now it is "out for delivery" on Dec. 3.

I know this is a first-world problem, and I don't want this to come across as a pile on Indigo, but to me this is a classic example of why I have defaulted to buying things on Amazon for so many years now.  Even if I can save a few bucks by browsing multiple retailers, it isn't really worth it most of the time.  Whether it's Indigo, Fossil, or Shoppers Drug Mart, it seems like our orders with non-Amazon online retailers are delivered late about 50% of the time.  And that's not even including the significant lag time already usually built into their shipping times (9 days, in the case of our Indigo order!)  With Amazon, we experience problems with maybe 2-3% of our orders.  And the fact they manage (many of) their own deliveries means they just can't/don't default to blaming Purolator, etc. for any delays.

I'm a reluctant Amazon fanboy, and I recognize for every anecdote I provide in their favour, there are probably ten horror stories that could emerge.  But their competition isn't making it any easier to consider them as alternatives.  
First world problems, man your on an even higher level.
Man.... Your complainjng about a couple days late for something that is not even remotely close to having any importance.

While there's poor kids in africa wanting to have some food and sometimes they have to wait longer than you did.
And while your scrolling looking for amazon people in the philippines and vietnam are looking for their lost loved ones when they got hot by the typhoon.

I guess only in Canada you can complain about something being a couple days late and that something being utterly useless


My break just finished, time to get back to work.......zug zug
warming up the earth 1 gas fill-up at a time...
You only live once, get a v8
Deal Addict
Dec 14, 2008
1396 posts
435 upvotes
Toronto
tmkf_patryk wrote: First world problems, man your on an even higher level.
Man.... Your complainjng about a couple days late for something that is not even remotely close to having any importance.

While there's poor kids in africa wanting to have some food and sometimes they have to wait longer than you did.
And while your scrolling looking for amazon people in the philippines and vietnam are looking for their lost loved ones when they got hot by the typhoon.

I guess only in Canada you can complain about something being a couple days late and that something being utterly useless


My break just finished, time to get back to work.......zug zug
Comments like this are so damn silly. I'm sure we all, and OP, understand what he's saying is a huge FWP. Ever complained about being cold while snuggled at home in a blanket? FWP. Every complained at the lineup at Timmies? FWP. Ever complained your internet is slow today? FWP. We both literally have thousands of posts on an internet discussion board for FWP, to get deals on crap we don't actually need. Thank God we don't have to stand in a bread line or carry a bucket to a well.

But to OP's point, Amazon is definitely the eCommerce king and you can feel that when trying to buy elsewhere online. Their logistics is incredible and I would love to read about it to understand what goes into the incredible machine.
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2007
3487 posts
1044 upvotes
Edmonton
Gunnerheadboy wrote: Comments like this are so damn silly.
I'm trying to be a bit while being honest at the same time.
I'm sure we all, and OP, understand what he's saying is a huge FWP.
OP is comparing a brick and mortar store(s) to something that is only online. Both use very different platforms. One is built so you can go inside, touch, smell, see and listen to whatever you want to buy and on the other (Amazon) the platform is there to get it to you ASAP without you ever physically seeing that object you are buying. Amazon is actually slower than the brick and mortar stores in that you can actually go and buy the item if your willing to drive and get in store (if it's in stock).
Why not compare apples to apples instead of apples to oranges. Sure they are both fruit but that's where the similarities end

Ever complained about being cold while snuggled at home in a blanket? FWP.

No, I am used to working outside. Coldest so far was -67 two years ago.
Ever complained at the lineup at Timmies? FWP.
No I don't drink coffee and their food is terrible
Ever complained your internet is slow today? FWP.
No, half the places I work.i don't even get signal, so I am grateful if I get any kind of connection
We both literally have thousands of posts on an internet discussion board for FWP, to get deals on crap we don't actually need. Thank God we don't have to stand in a bread line or carry a bucket to a well.
Lots of posts yes, but the last time I bought anything which I found from RFD must be around 10 years ago. And with these black friday and boxing day deals which get posted each year, I think it's all going downhill from an already low spot. I browse RFD on my breaks when I have some time and to read posts and kill time basically. I still have a CRT at home :)
But to OP's point, Amazon is definitely the eCommerce king and you can feel that when trying to buy elsewhere online. Their logistics is incredible and I would love to read about it to understand what goes into the incredible machine.
No denying that, Amazon is doing real well, and there are others trying to copy but need a miracle to get on an even playing field. And best place to understand would be to physically go and do it. Ask for a tour of their warehouse or apply for a job and stay for a week or part time. Hands on is the best kind of understanding you can get
warming up the earth 1 gas fill-up at a time...
You only live once, get a v8
Deal Addict
Dec 8, 2006
1460 posts
508 upvotes
I ordered a tv on black friday from amazon. They used purolator and the tracking hasn't updated in 5 days, thankfully amazon is sending me a replacement.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Mar 23, 2011
1751 posts
751 upvotes
It's hit and miss with Amazon too. My wife ordered something Nov 24th, and they estimate the delivery date to be between Dec 16 and jan 8.
I find all the bigger retailers are hit and miss. Ordered on BF a pair of Sweatpants from Roots...Still no delivery date, spoke on chat and they said it could be 12-16 days to be processed.
-----------------------------------------------------

"It's better to be dead and cool...than alive and uncool!"
Deal Addict
Dec 14, 2008
1396 posts
435 upvotes
Toronto
tmkf_patryk wrote: I'm trying to be a bit while being honest at the same time.


OP is comparing a brick and mortar store(s) to something that is only online. Both use very different platforms. One is built so you can go inside, touch, smell, see and listen to whatever you want to buy and on the other (Amazon) the platform is there to get it to you ASAP without you ever physically seeing that object you are buying. Amazon is actually slower than the brick and mortar stores in that you can actually go and buy the item if your willing to drive and get in store (if it's in stock).
Why not compare apples to apples instead of apples to oranges. Sure they are both fruit but that's where the similarities end



No, I am used to working outside. Coldest so far was -67 two years ago.


No I don't drink coffee and their food is terrible


No, half the places I work.i don't even get signal, so I am grateful if I get any kind of connection


Lots of posts yes, but the last time I bought anything which I found from RFD must be around 10 years ago. And with these black friday and boxing day deals which get posted each year, I think it's all going downhill from an already low spot. I browse RFD on my breaks when I have some time and to read posts and kill time basically. I still have a CRT at home :)


No denying that, Amazon is doing real well, and there are others trying to copy but need a miracle to get on an even playing field. And best place to understand would be to physically go and do it. Ask for a tour of their warehouse or apply for a job and stay for a week or part time. Hands on is the best kind of understanding you can get
> Coldest so far was -67 two years ago.

That's honestly insane 🥶, I really can't imagine that! Then I definitely shouldn't be complaining about being cold in my blanket haha.

I think we're both on the same page. I didn't mean to come off too defensive on OP's behalf. Happy holidays!
[OP]
Jr. Member
Feb 27, 2011
156 posts
130 upvotes
Well then....

Not sure I understand the hate Grinning Face With Smiling Eyes This is the RFD Shopping Discussion Forum. I think my OP meets that criteria. Was I trying to equate my frustrations with Indigo with the devastation caused by a typhoon in the Philippines? Um, no....

And I honestly agree with much of what has been written above. Do I say that Amazon is perfect? Um, no.... Do I say that Amazon is the best of what is available (at least, in Canada)? Um, kinda...

The fact remains that the shipping practices of a plethora of "brick and mortar" establishments in this country (selling online) are uncompetitive. They're slower, later, and more expensive, and you don't even have to use Amazon Prime as the benchmark. This fact means that more and more people (myself included) will default to Amazon for even mundane purchases going forward. And honestly, I don't know if this will be good for the Canadian consumer in the long term, but here we are.

That's the entirety of the point I was trying to make. Cheers.
Banned
User avatar
Nov 3, 2020
112 posts
95 upvotes
@costaguana,

yes I totally agree with you, Amazon has better logistics/tracking/fulfillment and often, prices.

Other retailers are playing catch-up, competing against a company that was built from the ground up with the "online" concept.

Try to see the bigger picture. What does it mean that Amazon has become so powerful that they threaten Walmart and all other retailers?

Can you imagine, say in 5 years, when you'll need something else for your kids, that your only reasonnable choice will be Amazon?

As in, these are the options to buy the item you really really need:
A. Order from Amazon for $219 and it in a week
or
B. Go to Walmart 2 hours drive and pay $99 (because your local Walmart closed... because Amazon...)

I believe this is where we are headed.

And all Amazon corporate profits are sent back to the USA, where we'll no longer see that money being redistributed in our community/country.

oh and your kids want a job? They can slave away in the Amazon warehouse at minimum wage.

Amazon is not a good neighbor.
Veteran RFD
Member
May 27, 2012
217 posts
81 upvotes
Whitehorse, YT
In Whitehorse, Yukon coldest was -42 last winter
Deal Expert
User avatar
Aug 18, 2005
20087 posts
4626 upvotes
Burlington-Hamilton
Amazon was never a brick & mortar company to begin with, so these other B&M companies pretending to be e-commerce companies still haven't caught up.

Amazon has its own incredibly powerful datacentres, advanced internet backbone, e-commerce automated warehouses, and their own specific subcontractors like Intelcom, Dynamex, etc., and even their own private delivery fleet. Their vertical integration and entrenchment is unmatched.

Compare this to other retailers whose warehouses are tuned for bulk distribution to B&M stores, and depend on union companies like Canada Post, Fedex, UPS, etc... I don't like it but Canadian retailers are 15+ years behind Amazon.

With more and more people finally being forced to learn to shop online due to the virus, I hope this will be the kick in the pants needed to improve in eCommerce experience for other retailers. For some reason, Amazon is actually making itself worse these days, with so many miscellaneous cheap China products, counterfeit products, sketchy 3rd party sellers, fake review services, fake shipping delays for non-Prime customers, fake "processing time" delays for Prime customers, etc., local retailers need to pounce on this opportunity.

Hopefully they will get their act together and make some kind of alternative delivery fleet, so they aren't limited by unionized delivery companies.
- casual gastronomist -
Member
User avatar
Dec 7, 2005
342 posts
74 upvotes
Halifax
I have a love hate relationship with Amazon. I think they are progressively becoming an evil company, mainly due to Bezos and how he treats his staff and it's getting harder to support them. That said, with his mantra of "customers are #1" all my issues with Amazon are usually resolved to my satisfaction and sometimes beyond. My packages are generally on time or before and rarely late.

It's not as if ecommerce hasn't been a thing for the last 15 years or something (beyond that actually). Other long time retailers have had sufficient time to invest in setting up websites as well as shipping and delivery logistics. Yes those shipping and delivery charges would be higher than Amazon since they have distribution centers across Canada and smaller retailers don't, but I don't have an issue with higher costs and supporting Canadian if the experience is a positive one.

My recent experience was with a water treatment store chain out of Ontario that have a fairly good online presence and decent website. I paid about 10% more than Amazon.ca had but wanted to do the "good thing". Well, one item was the wrong item and it took 3 phone calls and about 5 emails and a month and half later before I got the right item. On the replacement they actually sent me 2 of the right item so I had to call them to let them know so I could ship back the extra item. Won't be dealing with them again as a result which is too bad.

I was thinking to myself how I would have filled out the "wrong item" and Amazon would have sent the correct one to me in a matter of days and I would have returned the incorrect one and resolved in 30 seconds. how hard is that for retailers to implement?

Sears is the sad story in all this. They had Amazon's system way before and should have been the dominant player today but old school thinking in a new world killed them. Amazon too one day will fall to an upstart retailer or a shift in how we shop. I think VR and AR will change how we do online shopping eventually (especially for clothing) in the next 10 years once those technologies go mainstream. If some startup get's it right, you could see Amazon fall. Nothing lasts forever, not even Amazon will.
Deal Addict
Dec 27, 2007
3487 posts
1044 upvotes
Edmonton
adnanakhtar wrote: In Whitehorse, Yukon coldest was -42 last winter
I absolutely love whitehorse as a town/city. I was there for a bit travelling all of yukon and it was great.

My work experience is several hundred kilometers north of whitehorse (and to the east some)
Last edited by tmkf_patryk on Dec 6th, 2020 5:49 am, edited 1 time in total.
warming up the earth 1 gas fill-up at a time...
You only live once, get a v8
Sr. Member
Apr 5, 2017
884 posts
643 upvotes
Edmonton, AB
I don't think I want to buy anything from anywhere anymore around this time of year. The amount of online orders Walmart cancelled on me, and the amount of deceiving things on Amazon...it's hard to trust.

I'm trying to get creative with physical retail locations by going during the least busiest times. I had fun on Black Friday mornng going through nearly empty stores: Canadian Tire, Home Depot, Walmart, Visions etc. securing deals you could never secure online, because I could negotiate with store managers and cashiers. I probably saved $100 due to those interactions. Plus encountering further discounted items and being able to visually inspect etc. the items before purchase. Even found deals that nobody else did - $25 landscaper square point shovels on for $7 each because I found a clearance tag that had fallen behind the shelf with numbers matching the product, so the store honoured it. A regular $260 10" sliding w/ laser miter saw for $75 simply because they wanted to make room for the boxes upon boxes of black friday special tools.
Newbie
User avatar
Jan 8, 2018
15 posts
9 upvotes
Montreal
Except that just recently, I couldn't get the promised 2-Day delivery anymore with Prime. Most orders are scheduled for more than 4 days, and even 7 or 10 days on some products.
Makes me wonder whether it's a new trend of them, or just because they've been hit by too may orders during Black Friday/Cyber Monday.

Top