Real Estate

Why price discrepancy between Vaughan and Richmond Hill?

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  • Aug 30th, 2015 8:05 am
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Penalty Box
Oct 17, 2012
2689 posts
120 upvotes
fdl wrote: Some of Rouge Woods is in the Bayview Secondary district (consistently top 5 in the province) and well as top ranked elementary school.

Same goes for other areas in Richmond Hill. Richmond Hill high district has been on fire lately.

I also think RH is more central (Yonge St runs right up the middle) and proximity to 404 (direct highway to downtown) vs 400 to nowhere which is a plus.

That said Vaughan is by no means cheap. All of York region is expensive.
show me the website that state bayview SS is top 5 in the province
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Oct 8, 2014
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Unionville, ON
Didi_beee wrote: lol I'm not too worried about the quality of schools up there, both my siblings and husband's siblings went to crappy ranked schools in Guelph and Scarborough and everyone turned out fine. As long as your children are disciplined enough to study and get good grades, that's all they need to get into university or college. Once you get into those and do well, there's really nothing you have to worry about.
I agree 100%. I went to a crappy ranked school and still had no problems getting into university, same as all of my smart friends. Parents who stress over the rankings of schools are foolish.
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Oct 8, 2014
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Unionville, ON
Buccio wrote: You can buy in Barrie, Oro, or Orillia the same house for $300k you also will be close to lake so you don't need to buy a cottage. That is if you work in Vaughan or Richmond hill, it will only take 45 minute commute. Not bad for 600k savings!

example:

http://www.realtor.ca/Residential/Singl ... rio-L3V0A2
Barrie and Innisfil, yes. But Orillia? You're not gonna make it from Orillia to Richmond Hill in 45 minutes unless you drive 200km/h. I think Barrie is gonna appreciate very good, it's growing quite fast.
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Oct 9, 2008
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Buccio wrote: You can buy in Barrie, Oro, or Orillia the same house for $300k you also will be close to lake so you don't need to buy a cottage. That is if you work in Vaughan or Richmond hill, it will only take 45 minute commute. Not bad for 600k savings!

example:

http://www.realtor.ca/Residential/Singl ... rio-L3V0A2
lol if you think commute from Barrie, Oro or Orillia would only take 45 mins to get to Vaughan/Richmond Hill...
Banned
Jan 16, 2015
869 posts
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Toronto, ON
Coming down to wonderland there is never any traffic. Coming back on the weekends in the summer might be a jam.

102.1 km, 58 min driving
1 hr 16 min with traffic @100km/hr - LOL

https://www.bing.com/maps/#Y3A9NDQuNjEy ... A9MH4wfjB+

You live in in Innisville or Georgina and it would be a bit faster, but there is nothing around there, you will have to drive 20 min to a Mac's.
Sr. Member
Jul 19, 2007
841 posts
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Didi_beee wrote: lol I'm not too worried about the quality of schools up there, both my siblings and husband's siblings went to crappy ranked schools in Guelph and Scarborough and everyone turned out fine. As long as your children are disciplined enough to study and get good grades, that's all they need to get into university or college. Once you get into those and do well, there's really nothing you have to worry about.
Exactly. HS is irrelevant in Canada unlike the US where location and ratings of schools matter...
[OP]
Sr. Member
Sep 24, 2006
861 posts
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I wouldn't say that looking at Ontario school rankings are totally irrelevant. I don't think you can say that a 9.3 school is "better" than a 8.8 school. But compared to a 6.3 school, you have to wonder what the differences are. A one year score should be taken with a grain of salt but rankings are also shown for the last 5 years which are a better gauge of how a school is performing.

I dont want to get into the whole argument of the validity of such reports but the fact is that parents want their kids attending a "good" school. The school rankings are one way of quantifying "good". Now in addition to this, one should also visit the school and chat with the principal and teachers if possible to get the vibe of the place. In this digital age, several schools have online newsletters that are publicly viewable that showcase various events and happenings within the school and community. This also gives a window into the school's outlook and whether it may be a good fit for your kids.

Things are not the same as they were 20 years when I was in high school. Back in the mid 90s, hardly anyone had the internet at home and no one had cell phones. Now everyone is online all the time and you can chat with your circle of friends 24/7 if you so desire. Kids nowadays are constantly influenced by their peers at a much greater extent than ever before. As a result, It is even more important that your kids' circle of friends are decent folk and whose families share the same values as you do. If your kids are strong hearted and determined then maybe they will not be influenced as much. However, many kids are emotionally vulnerable and easily succumb to the power of peer pressure. You want to try and give them an environment with positive peer pressure, not negative.


I have work colleagues who lament about the schools their kids attend and how they are attempting to transfer them to a "better" school. Fights regularly break out, teachers dont seem to care, etc. Guess what, the rankings of these schools are usually below average.....

The bottom line is that you want your kids to be successful in school - both academically and socially. School rankings are one piece of the puzzle in determining a school's fit for your child.

KingKuba wrote: Exactly. HS is irrelevant in Canada unlike the US where location and ratings of schools matter...
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Dec 5, 2009
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I don't think you can ignore these rankings and scores, but it's flawed. The reason the system is flawed is because there is no way to know why a school scores the way it does on standardized testing.

For example, a school that scores a 9 could be doing so because most of the students are doing kumon and other after school programs. The teachers may actually suck and regular students will suffer in such an environment. Or it could be that teachers are teaching to the test, which again will have negative impacts on the students.

I agree with the idea that visiting the school , talking to the teachers and principal, and other parents is the best gauge a parent can make.
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Sep 23, 2014
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KingKuba wrote: Exactly. HS is irrelevant in Canada unlike the US where location and ratings of schools matter...
Not according to many well documented research:

http://www.thestar.com/yourtoronto/educ ... ehind.html
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/nat ... /?page=all

A few decades ago it might not matter but there is definitely a big difference in quality of education, student and school based on location.
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Sep 5, 2009
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Scores really just tell you how many ESL and special ed students are in the school. I have worked with these tests and scores for many years and we can largely predict a school's score even before the test is written just by looking at demographics. It is kind of crazy.
Banned
Jan 16, 2015
869 posts
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Toronto, ON
Obviously the schools are much better in Toronto. Students need to be exposed to different people and cultures etc. Vaughn and Richmond hill are robot villages, not a place for young people to grow and develop.
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Feb 29, 2008
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Montreal
traderjay wrote: Not according to many well documented research:

http://www.thestar.com/yourtoronto/educ ... ehind.html
http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/nat ... /?page=all

A few decades ago it might not matter but there is definitely a big difference in quality of education, student and school based on location.
Great. Toronto is on it's way to becoming the next LA.

The article doesn't exaclt exactly say good schools breed success. The biggest factor seems to be income. Rich people live in better neighbourhoods, and have more options. Being a poor person going to a public school in a rich neighbourhood won't necessarily provide the same benefits as having high come parents.

In other words, try to be rich. It's the best thing you can do for your kids.
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Apr 11, 2008
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mr_raider wrote: Great. Toronto is on it's way to becoming the next LA.

The article doesn't exaclt exactly say good schools breed success. The biggest factor seems to be income. Rich people live in better neighbourhoods, and have more options. Being a poor person going to a public school in a rich neighbourhood won't necessarily provide the same benefits as having high come parents.

In other words, try to be rich. It's the best thing you can do for your kids.
There are plenty of people who got higher educations through scholarships and hardworking. I am not sure the point of buying in good school district other than for resell values (since you can easily rent/cheat your way into a better school), but Asian culture's near obsessive emphasis on education certainly pays off.

That's why I never buy somebody's excuse that their parents are poor. Guess what, if children of penniless immigrants can be successful, you can too.
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Jan 16, 2009
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Archanfel wrote: There are plenty of people who got higher educations through scholarships and hardworking. I am not sure the point of buying in good school district other than for resell values (since you can easily rent/cheat your way into a better school), but Asian culture's near obsessive emphasis on education certainly pays off.

That's why I never buy somebody's excuse that their parents are poor. Guess what, if children of penniless immigrants can be successful, you can too.
It's correlation. Higher-income parents tend to be more educated, and have more free time with their kids. In result, the kids can focus on school without worrying about external factors such as getting a job or dealing with frustrated parents.

When you are in the neighborhood where most kids have parents that's doing well, they tend to compete better.
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Dec 5, 2009
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I can buy the argument that good schools, good teachers, good peers are a positive factor in a child's outcome.

But - That doesn't mean the Fraser ranking is a true representation of which schools or teachers are good. It's a flawed ranking.
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Jan 16, 2009
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fdl wrote: I can buy the argument that good schools, good teachers, good peers are a positive factor in a child's outcome.

But - That doesn't mean the Fraser ranking is a true representation of which schools or teachers are good. It's a flawed ranking.
That ranking is inaccurate. I went to a school that ranked 700 in Ontario and more than 10 of us that year (and it was small school) are going to top school(UT, Waterloo, Queens) program (Engineering).

At least half of us got master degree after that.

In Ontario, teachers are identical and it is always the peers that makes the difference (even in university).
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Apr 11, 2008
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Ceryx wrote: It's correlation. Higher-income parents tend to be more educated, and have more free time with their kids. In result, the kids can focus on school without worrying about external factors such as getting a job or dealing with frustrated parents.

When you are in the neighborhood where most kids have parents that's doing well, they tend to compete better.
I always thought higher income parents live in massive mansions and never see their kids. :)
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Jan 16, 2009
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Archanfel wrote: I always thought higher income parents live in massive mansions and never see their kids. :)
That's not higher income. That's extremely to the max income. :cheesygri
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Feb 29, 2008
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Ceryx wrote: It's correlation. Higher-income parents tend to be more educated, and have more free time with their kids. In result, the kids can focus on school without worrying about external factors such as getting a job or dealing with frustrated parents.

When you are in the neighborhood where most kids have parents that's doing well, they tend to compete better.
I agree. And the determinant factor is probably the parent's income, with the school being a byproduct. That being said, no one I know making more than 300k a year is sending their kids to public school, so who the eff cares about districts.

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