Computers & Electronics

Windows 10 Device Manager - nForce board - no driver for "Coprocessor"

  • Last Updated:
  • Jan 13th, 2018 12:07 pm
[OP]
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Windows 10 Device Manager - nForce board - no driver for "Coprocessor"

I have an old Acer X3400 with Athlon II X3 435 2.9 GHz with an integrated nVidia 9200 GPU. (Yes, it's an AMD CPU with an on-board nVidia GPU.) It only has Core 2 Duo class performance, but it's good enough for my home office since I just use it for Netflix, streaming TV, web browsing, Office, mail, and VPN. Everything seems to be working fine in Windows, but I notice that in Device Manager I have a ? beside the item "Coprocessor".

Is there any point in pursuing a fix for this? I see online that the fix is to install the latest version of nVidia Control Panel, or use Windows Update to look for the latest driver, but I already have the latest nVidia Control Panel and Windows Update finds nothing newer. (Windows 10 is the latest version, with all the updates too, with a legit activation.) What does "coprocessor" do anyway? Posts in various spots online say it's part of the nVidia chipset, but don't actually say what it does. The machine seems to work fine otherwise. (I sometimes have had a few glitches with Windows Update, but I think that's just Windows Update being Windows Update, and right now everything with Windows Update seems to be working.)
8 replies
[OP]
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tkyoshi wrote:
Jan 12th, 2018 11:29 am
It's basically the SM Bus controller. You can follow this (if you don't trust the source you can find an old copy of drivers). I've used this on old nForce systems:

https://matthill.eu/tutorials/nvidia-io ... dows-8-10/
Thanks, but this is not an ION system. I assume the ION driver would be inappropriate for this. Or would it be OK for a non-ION system too? (I do have a different Atom 330 ION system though. I have to check the "Coprocessor" entry in Device Manager for that one too. )

Is it critical to have the proper driver for this SM Bus Controller?
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Mar 6, 2005
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EugW wrote:
Jan 12th, 2018 11:35 am
Thanks, but this is not an ION system. I assume the ION driver would be inappropriate for this. Or would it be OK for a non-ION system too? (I do have a different Atom 330 ION system though. I have to check the "Coprocessor" entry in Device Manager for that one too. )

Is it critical to have the proper driver for this SM Bus Controller?
Sorry I forgot to add they are based off the same family, you can just extract the same file off your older chipset family driver package (most likely it's the same) the process should be the same. nForce/ION used mostly unified drivers just like GPUs.

Windows will still match the device ID so if the ION driver isn't the same for example it won't pick it up when you go through the driver update dialog.

To answer your question though, no it's not essential. It shouldn't really harm system performance - just you may loose the ability to use programs to read things like temperature sensors or voltage and it's more annoying seeing the ? in Device Manager.
[OP]
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If it's not critical, maybe I'll just forget it.

I don't understand why the unified nVidia Control Panel drivers don't cover this though.
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EugW wrote:
Jan 12th, 2018 11:44 am
If it's not critical, maybe I'll just forget it.

I don't understand why the unified nVidia Control Panel drivers don't cover this though.
Basically nVidia deprecated it after Windows 7 :/, and chose not to support the chipset anymore. And well I guess it's not "essential" for system functionality, I am somewhat surprised that Microsoft doesn't have a driver for it on Windows Update though considering they have some of the drivers for Intel Chipsets from a similar era.
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Jul 26, 2007
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Uninstall it from device manager and restart. It might find the driver.
[OP]
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peteryorkuca wrote:
Jan 12th, 2018 3:18 pm
Uninstall it from device manager and restart. It might find the driver.
Tried that. I uninstalled it and rebooted. Upon reboot Device Manager had it again with a ?. Still couldn't find the driver.
tkyoshi wrote:
Jan 12th, 2018 11:38 am
Sorry I forgot to add they are based off the same family, you can just extract the same file off your older chipset family driver package (most likely it's the same) the process should be the same. nForce/ION used mostly unified drivers just like GPUs.

Windows will still match the device ID so if the ION driver isn't the same for example it won't pick it up when you go through the driver update dialog.

To answer your question though, no it's not essential. It shouldn't really harm system performance - just you may loose the ability to use programs to read things like temperature sensors or voltage and it's more annoying seeing the ? in Device Manager.
According to the comments in that thread, that driver wouldn't work. The driver doesn't even work for ION 2. However, I found the Acer X3400 driver page.

http://www.driverscape.com/manufacturer ... x3400/2306

To my surprise, they actually have the drivers listed as Windows 10 compatible now. They didn't say that back in 2016.

The System Management Controller driver is in the SMU subdirectory of the Ethernet/System Management Controller 140.91 driver file. I installed that, and all seems fine now. Still works great after a restart.

Thanks guys! I don't notice anything different though.
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Mar 6, 2005
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Excellent!

Regarding #1 uninstall and rebooting wouldn't work cause it's not in the Windows Update catalog :(
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Ah! I didn't know exactly which generation you had, glad you found it. The difference is you don't have an unknown device anymore :D But yeah performance should be the same with/without it. Enjoy!

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