Food & Drink

Yogurt starter

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[OP]
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Aug 6, 2009
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Yogurt starter

I've been using a Cultures for Health greek starter for a year or so, prior to that I used a yogourmet. I'm looking for variety, any recommendations?
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May 28, 2012
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Saskatoon
I use Liberte Organic Plain 2.5 % mf. I can post my yogurt making method if anyone is interested.
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I haven't bought yogurt in the grocery in years. it would have to have active bacteria and preferable a heirloom style so it lasts over time not just once or twice. I'd rather buy a starter and was looking for suggestions.
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Mars2012 wrote: I use Liberte Organic Plain 2.5 % mf. I can post my yogurt making method if anyone is interested.
Sure, I'd be interested in your method/temps!
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May 28, 2012
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Saskatoon
jackie999 wrote: Sure, I'd be interested in your method/temps!
Like I said earlier, I use Liberte Organic Plain but you can use any plain yogurt, just make sure you like the taste of it because your homemade yogurt will be similar in taste and texture. You only need a couple Tbs to seed each batch. From my experience, replenishing with new store-bought yogurt every 6-7 batches is the way to go because store bought yogurt doesn't contain as many diverse bacteria as an heirloom variety (and it goes kind of funky over time). I think there are heirloom yogurt cultures that can be used indefinitely but I haven't been able to source any locally or even online.

I use an entire 4 L jug of whole milk at a time - this makes 4 -1 quart mason jars. My method: in a large stockpot add the 4 L jug of milk. Heat to 180F (stirring occasionally) and then drop to 110F (you can use an ice bath to make it cool faster). Put 2 Tbs store bought yogurt into a bowl and mix with a bit of the warm milk, stir until smooth. Stir this mixture back into the pot and give it a thorough mix. Ladle into clean quart jars. Put jars into a large canner or stockpot. I also nestle three repurposed passata jars (any tall, narrow will do) filled with boiling water amongst the filled yogurt jars. Put lid onto pot and cover the entire thing with a really thick blanket. I have one that has a sherpa lining and I also put the pot on a folded blanket (you want to fully enclose it to keep in the warmth). Leave this for 7-8 hours or overnight. If you leave it for too long, it can get quite sour. I find around 7 - 7 1/2 hours is perfect. Keep jars in fridge when done. I like this method because it makes a large amount and you don't have to disturb the set yogurt (i.e when making in a crock pot).
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Sep 1, 2005
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Markham
As long as the yogurt has ACTIVE culture, it'll work...no need to buy specific starter. I used to heat the milk and then cool it, heat a thermos (with hot water just so temp doesn't drop much) , put yogurt and heated milk in thermos and close and leave it overnight....next day, I got yogurt. Easy peasy.

I haven't made yogurt in a long time...as I now make Kefir instead. More probiotics and no heating/cooling etc. Just add kefir grains to milk and leave it overnight.
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May 28, 2012
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gr8dlr wrote: As long as the yogurt has ACTIVE culture, it'll work...no need to buy specific starter. I used to heat the milk and then cool it, heat a thermos (with hot water just so temp doesn't drop much) , put yogurt and heated milk in thermos and close and leave it overnight....next day, I got yogurt. Easy peasy.

I haven't made yogurt in a long time...as I now make Kefir instead. More probiotics and no heating/cooling etc. Just add kefir grains to milk and leave it overnight.
I make milk kefir too and it's a totally different product than yogurt, both in taste/texture and uses. My children will eat the yogurt but they won't touch milk kefir unless I use it in cooking and baking (which negates the probiotics but I make more than I can use for drinks). I've strained out kefir but it is more like a cream cheese consistency than yogurt.
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Mars2012 wrote: I make milk kefir too and it's a totally different product than yogurt, both in taste/texture and uses. My children will eat the yogurt but they won't touch milk kefir unless I use it in cooking and baking (which negates the probiotics but I make more than I can use for drinks). I've strained out kefir but it is more like a cream cheese consistency than yogurt.
Wife uses it for smoothies...I will use it to cook/bake.
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Jr. Member
Oct 17, 2013
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Ontario
In the past, I ordered my cultures from Glengarry Cheesemaking and they were very good. Now I just use Liberte Mediterranee as a starter because I love it. Adding a bit of vanilla and your favourite sweetener before leaving it to ferment is extremely yummy.

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