Students

York to Ryerson

  • Last Updated:
  • Dec 25th, 2015 9:58 am
[OP]
Newbie
Dec 10, 2015
10 posts
3 upvotes
Toronto, ON

York to Ryerson

I'm going to be attending York for Administrative studies this upcoming winter and summer semester and i'm looking to transfer to Ryerson for the fall semester. However from what I have seen Ryerson makes you do 6 courses in your first year per semester and York makes you do 5 per semester. Would it be possible for me to transfer all of my credits to Ryerson and not have to take any extra courses when I get there? I know Ryerson's credit system is a lot different where one course is like .5 credits while York's courses give 3 credits. Has anyone transferred from York to Ryerson and if so did most of your credits go through? Also, I did contact Ryerson about this and they told me to apply first and get accepted, then talk to them. Just trying to get some more experienced people's opinion.
18 replies
Sr. Member
Jan 1, 2015
594 posts
470 upvotes
Toronto, ON
Justabanana wrote: I'm going to be attending York for Administrative studies this upcoming winter and summer semester and i'm looking to transfer to Ryerson for the fall semester. However from what I have seen Ryerson makes you do 6 courses in your first year per semester and York makes you do 5 per semester. Would it be possible for me to transfer all of my credits to Ryerson and not have to take any extra courses when I get there? I know Ryerson's credit system is a lot different where one course is like .5 credits while York's courses give 3 credits. Has anyone transferred from York to Ryerson and if so did most of your credits go through? Also, I did contact Ryerson about this and they told me to apply first and get accepted, then talk to them. Just trying to get some more experienced people's opinion.
I hear a lot of Ryerson kids taking accounting at York and transferring the credits over. I don't see why you can't as long as the courses are very similar
Sr. Member
May 12, 2003
801 posts
238 upvotes
Is there a reason why you are looking to transfer from York to Ryerson?

They are different schools and different brandings when employers come to play.
[OP]
Newbie
Dec 10, 2015
10 posts
3 upvotes
Toronto, ON
I want to take Ryerson's Economics and Management Science major. I don't think York offers that major and also, a lot of my high school friends go to Ryerson. Do school names even matter? I thought grades were more important. The only issue I have is whether or not I have to take additional courses once I get to Ryerson since they make you take 6 courses per semester instead of 5. Most of the courses I am taking in York should transfer as I confirmed them with ONTransfer.
Sr. Member
Jan 1, 2015
594 posts
470 upvotes
Toronto, ON
Justabanana wrote: I want to take Ryerson's Economics and Management Science major. I don't think York offers that major and also, a lot of my high school friends go to Ryerson. Do school names even matter? I thought grades were more important. The only issue I have is whether or not I have to take additional courses once I get to Ryerson since they make you take 6 courses per semester instead of 5. Most of the courses I am taking in York should transfer as I confirmed them with ONTransfer.
School name matters to a degree, but work experience trumps all. If you can leverage your skills right and get good experience throughout university, then you can get a good job regardless of what school you go to.
Sr. Member
May 12, 2003
801 posts
238 upvotes
School's name does matter significantly. It's not the name per se, but the reputation of the school to produce good workforce.

For example, within the GTA, if you're an accounting student out of waterloo vs. york. The waterloo student would be offered a job first. Hands down.
For engineering, Waterloo and UofT are the best
For business, york is the best
For sciences, UofT and McMaster

etc etc.


Justabanana wrote: I want to take Ryerson's Economics and Management Science major. I don't think York offers that major and also, a lot of my high school friends go to Ryerson. Do school names even matter? I thought grades were more important. The only issue I have is whether or not I have to take additional courses once I get to Ryerson since they make you take 6 courses per semester instead of 5. Most of the courses I am taking in York should transfer as I confirmed them with ONTransfer.
[OP]
Newbie
Dec 10, 2015
10 posts
3 upvotes
Toronto, ON
ssj4_ootaku wrote: School's name does matter significantly. It's not the name per se, but the reputation of the school to produce good workforce.

For example, within the GTA, if you're an accounting student out of waterloo vs. york. The waterloo student would be offered a job first. Hands down.
For engineering, Waterloo and UofT are the best
For business, york is the best
For sciences, UofT and McMaster

etc etc.
I know York is really good for Business because they have Schulich program but when I think about it I ask myself, do I want to be in the bottom 50% of Schulich or in the top 20% of Ted Rogers. I do want to go to a good school but I also don't want to kill myself studying at Schulich. I figure Ryerson wouldn't be crazy competitive and would still be reputable enough for me to get a job. I am however, going to try to look for work experience related to my major during the summer of my 2nd and 3rd year, even if it is volunteering.
Deal Addict
Aug 14, 2015
1828 posts
573 upvotes
Justabanana wrote: I know York is really good for Business because they have Schulich program but when I think about it I ask myself, do I want to be in the bottom 50% of Schulich or in the top 20% of Ted Rogers. I do want to go to a good school but I also don't want to kill myself studying at Schulich. I figure Ryerson wouldn't be crazy competitive and would still be reputable enough for me to get a job. I am however, going to try to look for work experience related to my major during the summer of my 2nd and 3rd year, even if it is volunteering.
You can get into schulich?

If so, go.

Regular york biz /=/ schulich. not even close.
Member
Sep 29, 2014
216 posts
173 upvotes
Toronto, ON
Justabanana wrote: I know York is really good for Business because they have Schulich program but when I think about it I ask myself, do I want to be in the bottom 50% of Schulich or in the top 20% of Ted Rogers. I do want to go to a good school but I also don't want to kill myself studying at Schulich. I figure Ryerson wouldn't be crazy competitive and would still be reputable enough for me to get a job. I am however, going to try to look for work experience related to my major during the summer of my 2nd and 3rd year, even if it is volunteering.
Your logic is highly flawed. Schulich is far from being difficult. Classes are curved to a B/B+ average and there is very little math in the program. The bottom level students at Schulich will likely have around a B average anyways while the bottom average Ryerson students will have C's. Grades are tougher to get in larger class settings and Ryerson accepts over 1000 first year business students. You think you'll be top 20% there just because you got a 90+ high school average? Getting high grades now in highschool is a joke. Heard of grade inflation? There is little correlation with highschool grades and university success.

Lastly, for business the school name matters. Schulich has a better reputation, better internships, better alumni and recruiting, better professors, better peers to work and study with, better recognition from business employers, and so on. Start looking at the employment rates for business schools at the Big 4, Bay street, fortune 500 companies and see how many people you find there from lower level business schools. Not many at all. Some companies only strictly recruit from the top business schools.

You want to go to Ryerson because more of your highschool friends go there? Make new friends and expand your network and social circle. How do you expect to make it big in business if you're choosing a university based on where you highschool friends are going. Chances are you guys wont see each other often anyways, as people mature and grow up and go their separate ways. Highschool friendships rarely last.

I have many friends in high level business positions, and the truth is coming out of Ryerson or York Admin studies you will never be viewed on the same level as someone who went to Schulich, Ivey, Queen's Commerce, Laurier business coop, Rotman, Waterloo AFM, McGill DeSautels, etc.
Member
May 27, 2007
423 posts
35 upvotes
Eragon wrote: Your logic is highly flawed. Schulich is far from being difficult. Classes are curved to a B/B+ average and there is very little math in the program. The bottom level students at Schulich will likely have around a B average anyways while the bottom average Ryerson students will have C's. Grades are tougher to get in larger class settings and Ryerson accepts over 1000 first year business students. You think you'll be top 20% there just because you got a 90+ high school average? Getting high grades now in highschool is a joke. Heard of grade inflation? There is little correlation with highschool grades and university success.

Lastly, for business the school name matters. Schulich has a better reputation, better internships, better alumni and recruiting, better professors, better peers to work and study with, better recognition from business employers, and so on. Start looking at the employment rates for business schools at the Big 4, Bay street, fortune 500 companies and see how many people you find there from lower level business schools. Not many at all. Some companies only strictly recruit from the top business schools.

You want to go to Ryerson because more of your highschool friends go there? Make new friends and expand your network and social circle. How do you expect to make it big in business if you're choosing a university based on where you highschool friends are going. Chances are you guys wont see each other often anyways, as people mature and grow up and go their separate ways. Highschool friendships rarely last.

I have many friends in high level business positions, and the truth is coming out of Ryerson or York Admin studies you will never be viewed on the same level as someone who went to Schulich, Ivey, Queen's Commerce, Laurier business coop, Rotman, Waterloo AFM, McGill DeSautels, etc.
QFT.

If you can get into Schulich undergrad, then do it. I would advise this to anyone interested in getting into the business world. As someone who went to York BAS, I can tell you, as well, that Schulich students are not supermen and women and their courses are not sooooo much harder then the regular business program. I had Schulich kids sitting with me in a lot of accounting courses and they did no better than me. On the other hand, I have a buddy who graduated from Schulich undergrad, who from a single dinner meetup with other Schulich grads, managed to snag a job in one of the Big 5 Banks capital markets divisions as an I-Banker.
Deal Addict
Jun 12, 2015
2231 posts
786 upvotes
Ontario
ghost416 wrote: QFT.

If you can get into Schulich undergrad, then do it. I would advise this to anyone interested in getting into the business world. As someone who went to York BAS, I can tell you, as well, that Schulich students are not supermen and women and their courses are not sooooo much harder then the regular business program. I had Schulich kids sitting with me in a lot of accounting courses and they did no better than me. On the other hand, I have a buddy who graduated from Schulich undergrad, who from a single dinner meetup with other Schulich grads, managed to snag a job in one of the Big 5 Banks capital markets divisions as an I-Banker.
Since when did Schulich accounting allow York BAS to sit in and vice versa. The only time the two programs would meet is 1st year econ and non business electives.
Sr. Member
Aug 7, 2011
712 posts
273 upvotes
ghost416 wrote: QFT.

If you can get into Schulich undergrad, then do it. I would advise this to anyone interested in getting into the business world. As someone who went to York BAS, I can tell you, as well, that Schulich students are not supermen and women and their courses are not sooooo much harder then the regular business program. I had Schulich kids sitting with me in a lot of accounting courses and they did no better than me. On the other hand, I have a buddy who graduated from Schulich undergrad, who from a single dinner meetup with other Schulich grads, managed to snag a job in one of the Big 5 Banks capital markets divisions as an I-Banker.
LOL If only it was that easy... I assure you that your buddy must have had some sort of combination of the following: really high grades, finance-related extracurriculars and/or internships, attended multiple networking events, had many coffees with the right bankers, and on.

Saying that he became an I-Banker just by going to one dinner would imply that becoming an I-Banker from Schulich is relatively easy. I assure you, it is not (not in these times anyway). 99% of people recruiting for this have worked their *** off.

Also, Schulich students are not allowed to take any York ADMS courses (and I'm pretty sure ADMS includes all of the accounting courses), unless things were different during your day.

Finally, I absolutely agree that they are not superman/women. They're just harder working and take advantage of the facilities provided by the school such as networking sessions and career center programs. Most of all, being in an environment full of students with a lot of drive and ambition helps you carry yourself. The competitive environment is one where everyone drives each other to accomplish great things, even if you weren't competitive by nature during high school.
Member
May 27, 2007
423 posts
35 upvotes
Dynasty12345 wrote: Since when did Schulich accounting allow York BAS to sit in and vice versa. The only time the two programs would meet is 1st year econ and non business electives.
I took accounting at York from 2005 to 2009. At that time, it was a one way street, with Schulich students being able to take BAS courses for credit, and not the other way around. And it makes sense in a way since BAS courses are designed to be flexible (i.e. evenings, weekends). This might be why I had a Schulich student or two sitting in with me for advance taxation and advance auditing.

I can't speak to the program now, especially since the formation of LAPS. At that time, it was the end of, but still BAS at Atkinson.
Member
May 27, 2007
423 posts
35 upvotes
1theguy1 wrote: LOL If only it was that easy... I assure you that your buddy must have had some sort of combination of the following: really high grades, finance-related extracurriculars and/or internships, attended multiple networking events, had many coffees with the right bankers, and on.

Saying that he became an I-Banker just by going to one dinner would imply that becoming an I-Banker from Schulich is relatively easy. I assure you, it is not (not in these times anyway). 99% of people recruiting for this have worked their *** off.

Also, Schulich students are not allowed to take any York ADMS courses (and I'm pretty sure ADMS includes all of the accounting courses), unless things were different during your day.

Finally, I absolutely agree that they are not superman/women. They're just harder working and take advantage of the facilities provided by the school such as networking sessions and career center programs. Most of all, being in an environment full of students with a lot of drive and ambition helps you carry yourself. The competitive environment is one where everyone drives each other to accomplish great things, even if you weren't competitive by nature during high school.
Well, to be clear, I never said it was that easy. The facts that I stated were 1) my buddy is an undergrad from Schulich and 2) he snagged an I-Banking gig at one of the Big 5 banks via a single dinner meetup with other Schulich grads. No other facts were given. There is quite a bit more to the story, the big one perhaps being that he was already working as an I-Banker. However, the fact remains that, I, as a BAS guy, will never get those kind of opportunities, which is the point of this little tale.

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